333 posts tagged with Water.
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Liquid Assets: How the Business of Bottled Water Went Mad by Sophie Elmhirst [The Guardian] “Water is no longer simply water – it has become a commercial blank slate, a word on to which any possible ingredient or fantastical, life-enhancing promise can be attached. And it’s working. Over the past two decades, bottled water has become the fastest-growing drinks market in the world. The global market was valued at $157bn in 2013, and is expected to reach $280bn by 2020. Last year, in the UK alone, consumption of water drinks grew by 8.2%, equating to a retail value of more than £2.5bn. Sales of water are 100 times higher than in 1980. Of water: a substance that, in developed countries, can be drunk for free from a tap without fear of contracting cholera. What is going on?”
posted by Fizz on Oct 8, 2016 - 55 comments

Hey, you got water in my fuel mixture. Hey, you got fuel in my water.

New York Times: "For decades, automakers have relied on turbocharging, which uses energy captured from exhaust gases to force additional air into the cylinders, to increase the power and efficiency of some gasoline engines." "[Now] a prominent automotive supplier has developed a counterintuitive technology that could enhance turbocharged engines for passenger cars by improving fuel economy with no reduction in power. How? By spraying water into the cylinders as the engine is operating." Warning: Some marketing speak in quotes.
posted by mr_bovis on Sep 30, 2016 - 37 comments

King Tides and Exodus in the Marshall Islands

With a global mean temperature rise of 1.5℃ (video, direct .mp4 link) the Marshall Islands, site of the US's Bikini Atoll nuclear weapons tests, may disappear completely. With most islands just six feet above sea level and less than a mile wide the ring of atolls is already severely affected by climate change. ⅓ of all Marshall Islanders are believed to live in the US, although they may face deportation. In recent months the residents of the Pacific island nation have been advised to cease eating fish after elevated levels of PCBs were found in the waters around the US missile base on Kwajalein Atoll. Recently, very previously, previously, previously, personal anecdotes.
posted by XMLicious on Sep 16, 2016 - 13 comments

They say it's the biggest gathering of Native Americans in 100 years.

Last week, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota emerged as climate change heroes when, with little political clout or media spotlight, they halted construction of the $3.7 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline. The defiance, based on a desire to protect both Sioux burial grounds and the waters of the Missouri River, evoked America’s ugly racial past—and present. “It feels like 1875 because Natives are still fighting for our land,” tweeted Native American writer Sherman Alexie, about a week before the pipeline security loosed attack dogs on the protesters, causing the internet to compare images of the ensuing chaos to images of Selma in 1965. A delegation from Black Lives Matter has visited the resistance camp, as have Amnesty International and MSNBC. But it's not the non-Native visitors who are the most interesting: what may be most important about the Standing Rock camps is that they have brought about the greatest gathering of Native Americans in more than a century. "Not since Little Big Horn have we stood together in this way," wrote one camp organizer. "The heart of the aboriginal world has been reawakened." [more inside]
posted by hungrytiger on Sep 4, 2016 - 115 comments

A Slaptstick Masterpeice.

A detailed play by play breakdown of a very short gif. Featuring a cute doggy. [more inside]
posted by idiopath on Aug 11, 2016 - 30 comments

The Human Utility

How to Save a City Through a Website There was a make-a-payment button, and I thought, What if we collected the PDF full of account numbers? What if we built a website to find people who were having problems paying their bills and we get their account numbers and we say we'll log into their account and just pay some bills for them? That's pretty much how we've paid the bulk of the first early bills.
posted by Michele in California on Aug 5, 2016 - 18 comments

Put on your high-heel sneakers…

WaterWigs is a personal project of photographer Tim Tadder. A "Making of" video explains how and why. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jul 16, 2016 - 6 comments

Climate change is already here

Should the United States Save Tangier Island From Oblivion? (New York Times) "...she built the house in a place where the bay was steadily advancing on her backyard every year, usually by about a dozen feet."
posted by freakazoid on Jul 6, 2016 - 68 comments

Ten Degrees Above Average

Alaska is Having Its Hottest Year Since Records Began - "After a spring that was a full ten degrees hotter than normal, the northern state is on track for the most sweltering year on record." (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jun 11, 2016 - 82 comments

People with their pets and phones in the bathroom

Cats vs. Bathtubs
posted by The Whelk on Jun 3, 2016 - 55 comments

Chlorine probably saved your life today

We don't know for certain if the Gas! GAS! in Wilfred Owen's devastating poem was chlorine, but we do know that it can kill and maim in the way he described. But when his poem was written, chlorine had already begun to play a completely different, quietly heroic role, going on to save hundreds of millions of lives over the course of the 20th century. The battle to get chlorine accepted for water treatment was understandably dramatic given its known killing power. In 1908, John Leal, in almost complete secrecy, without any permission from government authorities (and no notice to the general public)... decided to add chlorine to the Jersey City reservoirs. [more inside]
posted by clawsoon on May 28, 2016 - 40 comments

all kinds of water in voxels

Water in voxels: a pleasant little collection of watery scenes hand-drawn in chunky 3D. (Voxels are the 3d equivalent of pixels, like the blocks that make up a minecraft world.) [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on May 5, 2016 - 3 comments

Paper for Water

Katherine and Isabelle Adams are 9 and 11 years old. When they learned that girls in many places have to walk for miles to get to the nearest well (and clean drinking water), they decided they wanted to help. They started selling their origami ornaments to fund a single well in Ethiopia. When they overshot their goal, they just kept going. [more inside]
posted by colfax on May 3, 2016 - 4 comments

Scots are mad for citrus!

Scurvy Dogs - A brief overview of the history of the scurvy, brought to you by naval cartoonist Lucy Bellwood
posted by a lungful of dragon on Apr 27, 2016 - 19 comments


Water will flow once more in Maui streams long diverted to feed the island's thirsty sugar cane industry. The water will now be available for the cultivation of kalo, or taro, a plant with historic and cultural significance whose cultivation has had a complicated history. This marks a win for local taro farmers, who had been fighting for some time for the return of water. The water returns as the sugar industry departs the island for good, taking a number of jobs with it. [more inside]
posted by cubby on Apr 21, 2016 - 12 comments

Mapping lead exposure risk by census tract

Vox, with the help of the Washington State Department of Health, has used "housing and poverty data in our calculations to [map] areas of risk" for lead poisoning. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Apr 6, 2016 - 32 comments

Flint Water Crisis Runs Deeper and Wider

Last month, Flint, Michigan, declared a state of emergency as a result of serious contamination of the municipal water supply. Since then, the issue has expanded from a municipal problem to a scandal reaching the Governor's office and the White House. The situation in Flint took up much of the annual State of the State address this week. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Jan 20, 2016 - 120 comments

factory farming: the plants are fed by fish poo alone

GrowUp: the future of food - "The new concept of commercial aquaponics, argue Hofman and Webster, has a much-reduced environmental impact. Companion farming fish and crops dates back to the Aztecs, but it took until the 2010s, in Chicago, to move it indoors at any scale. In the UK, only eco-smallholdings have so far attempted it, and the only European aquaponics farms of note use purpose-built greenhouses. GrowUp's model, by contrast, is to fit out empty urban buildings, use no chemicals, employ LED lights, source 100 per cent renewable energy and, crucially, be based within five miles of its customer base in a dense urban area."
posted by kliuless on Dec 28, 2015 - 21 comments

A rain of data

The Seattle Natural Hazard Explorer lets you explore where different parts of the city of Seattle, Washington are most vulnerable to potentially catastrophic geological events like earthquakes (previously) and volcanoes. It is one of many visualizations or choropleths that connect ever-changing data with explorable geographic locations, such as an Atlas for a Changing Planet and Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis
posted by a lungful of dragon on Dec 28, 2015 - 12 comments

"The City of Flint has experienced a Manmade disaster"

The city of Flint, Michigan, disconnected its municipal water supply from the Detroit system in April 2014 while a new pipeline to Lake Huron was being installed. The interim supply came from the local Flint River, and almost immediately, people complained that the new water was cloudy and smelled bad. Over the next eighteen months, though, the news got worse, and the state came up with $12 million to switch the water supply back. This week, the newly elected Mayor of Flint declared an emergency due to skyrocketing lead levels in the blood of Flint's children, asking the Genesee County Board of Commissioners to address the situation.
posted by Etrigan on Dec 15, 2015 - 76 comments

Just a bunch of blondes in a swimming pool

Intrepid band of puppies take a swim for the first time.
posted by phunniemee on Nov 15, 2015 - 34 comments

Boing, boing, boing

See drops of water 'trampoline' higher and higher At first, the drop rested motionless on the surface, but at around a twentieth of normal atmospheric pressure it suddenly jumped up. After a short leap the droplet eventually landed on the surface again, only to jump up again—even higher than the first time.
posted by Michele in California on Nov 6, 2015 - 5 comments

Water Ballet

Dutch artist/musician Kamiel Rongen creates liquid landscapes, WaterBallet if you will. Here are all of them. Here is his website.
posted by growabrain on Nov 4, 2015 - 4 comments

Britain's water crisis

The risk here is not that millions of people in Britain are suddenly going to die of thirst. It is that after all those years in which humans settled by rivers and thrived, we are now locked in conflict with our natural surroundings. Either the humans or the rivers have to suffer. At the moment, it is the rivers, although in the longer term a sick river will produce less water, so the humans will end up in trouble as well. (longformGrauniad)
posted by Kitteh on Oct 8, 2015 - 12 comments

Permeable concrete is interesting

(Product video) Topmix Permeable has a claimed average permeability rate of 600 litres, per minute, per square meter. Watch the concrete in a small area of car park soak up 4,000 litres in a minute. An explanation version and a few caveats. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Sep 29, 2015 - 66 comments

A lesson in value

Why You Should Buy An Acrylic Water Pipe
posted by josher71 on Sep 29, 2015 - 59 comments

There is Water on Mars

The New York Times is reporting that NASA is about to announce the discovery of "definitive signs of liquid water on the surface of present-day Mars."
posted by schmod on Sep 28, 2015 - 109 comments

A vast ocean underlies the ice on Enceladus

Cassini Finds Global Ocean in Saturn's Moon Enceladus. "A global ocean lies beneath the icy crust of Saturn's geologically active moon Enceladus, according to new research using data from NASA's Cassini mission." The discovery of a global ocean beneath its icy rind makes Enceladus an even better potential extraterrestrial incubator than previously thought. [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Sep 21, 2015 - 30 comments

How do 21 puppies beat the heat?

By playing in a sprinkler, of course, while listening to Tchaikovsky. [SLYT]
posted by lharmon on Sep 16, 2015 - 12 comments

What would MetaFilter Water taste like?

Artisanal water is a thing. Products include Fat Water, which contains 2 grams (20 calories) of Bulletproof XCT oil (related: buttered coffee chain). More conventionally, Whole Foods recently sold three stalks of asparagus in 16 oz of water for $6 for a short while. There is artesian Norwegian water, which some allege is “identical to the municipal water supply”. In Texas, Scottish artisanal water is free (though must purchase $2,900 meal to accompany). There is Canadian glacier water, poured by water butlers in Ireland but costing 53 Canadian dollars per bottle. In a Los Angeles bistro, you can drink Berg, a “glacial water from western Greenland” harvested from 15,000-year-old glaciers and displaying “sweet” and “smooth” tones ($20 per 0.75 liter bottle). And finally the Timmy Brothers explain their artisanal water journey (“It’s like opening up a Mark Twain story, except without the racist parts”).
posted by Wordshore on Aug 23, 2015 - 76 comments

It's like Uber for shower gel

"In lieu of showering I sprayed myself with AOBiome’s custom skin bacteria blend. Body odor is caused by the emissions of proliferating skin bacteria, as unique as a fingerprint. The Nitrosomonas eutropha taking over my skin now metabolizes ammonia into odorless nitrite and nitric oxide. Success! I wish I had a strain that excreted lipases, as my hair was still greasy." Why is the software engineer behind Soylent not using water in the shower and spraying himself with dirt instead? [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Aug 7, 2015 - 131 comments

"It's a liter of adventure!"

The Timmy Brothers: Water Makers (SLVimeo)
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jul 31, 2015 - 3 comments

Common Waters: Politics and the public water fountain

It's been over 100 years since the common cup for public water fountains was banned, reducing their health risks. But we don't trust drinking fountains anymore—and "it’s making us poorer, less healthy and less green." [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Jul 25, 2015 - 68 comments

Not due to legalization

While California's water shortage continues, Cascadia has been suffering its own drought conditions, to the extent that expanding wildfires have lent the skies of Vancouver, B.C. a Mars-like orange hue.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jul 5, 2015 - 59 comments

"I call it the war on suburbia."

As California's drought worsens, those who live in Rancho Santa Fe — one of the wealthiest communities in the US — seem to agree: "We’re not all equal when it comes to water."
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 14, 2015 - 153 comments

Jon Drinks Water

Does what it says on the tin, 2945 times. [more inside]
posted by sparklemotion on May 22, 2015 - 28 comments

"If one of you gets eaten, we will name the boat after you," I said.

In the summer of 1987, my father tried to murder me with an alligator.
posted by zarq on May 13, 2015 - 18 comments

Water Table

California's crippling drought has prompted conservation efforts, such as replacing grass lawns and minding how long you leave the tap water running. But what about the food on your plate? Agriculture uses 80% of California's water supply, and producing what you eat can require a surprising amount of water. The LA Times' Interactive Water Footprint tells you How much water is used to produce your food? [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Apr 22, 2015 - 42 comments

Salt in soil from bygone era may be keeping briney water on Mars liquid

Mars might have liquid water, according to new findings We know Mars has water, and we also know that Mars once had liquid water (a whole ocean, in fact) but now it seems we may have evidence of liquid water today. [more inside]
posted by Michele in California on Apr 14, 2015 - 22 comments

droplet ballet

"The Mystery of the Dancing Droplets" [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Apr 9, 2015 - 7 comments

Seventy percent of the world is coated with goo

At the very top of oceans and inland waters lies a distinct micrometer-thick microbial habitat. It influences climate change, fosters unusual and deadly bacteria, and is made of jelly. It is the surface microlayer.
posted by bismol on Apr 8, 2015 - 24 comments

Water, Water, Everywhere

NASA posits a larger amount of water in the solar system and beyond. With the recent hypothesis (trigger: bad science) that extra terrestrials might be quite large, how long do we have until the Space Whales come for us? Discuss.
posted by Abehammerb Lincoln on Apr 8, 2015 - 38 comments

“I’m not going to stop watering,”

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth [New York Times]
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.
California Water Use [New York Times] Are you affected? [New York Times] The Drought, explained. [New York Times Video] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Apr 5, 2015 - 168 comments


Toshio Shibata’s Mesmerizing Photographs of Water [New York Times]
The Japanese photographer Toshio Shibata is fascinated by water — in particular, the way it interacts with man-made structures. For the later half of his almost-40-year career in photography, he has explored this relationship in novel ways, hiding horizon lines and taking the perspective of the water itself with his camera, visually evoking its rushing sound.
posted by Fizz on Mar 27, 2015 - 8 comments

Welcome to the future; enjoy your waterblob!

"When we drink bottled water we throw away plastic, [and] 80% of the bottles are not recycled..... Ooho! uses the culinary technique of sphereification, the water is encapsulated in a double gelatinous membrane. The technique consist into apply sodium alginate (E-401) from the brown algae and calcium chloride (E-509) in a concrete proportions in order to generate a gelification on the exterior of the liquid. The final package is simple, cheap (2ct/unit), resistant, hygienic, biodegradable and even eatable."
posted by Blue Jello Elf on Mar 23, 2015 - 72 comments

I'm only happy when it...

Rainworks are positive messages and art that only appear when it rains. Peregrine Church watched a video showing off the properties of superhydrophobic coatings and got an idea uniquely suited to his environment: famously rainy Seattle.* Using a spray-on coating, he did a stencil at a bus stop. It's invisible in dry weather, but as rain hits it and the wet concrete darkens, the writing and art becomes clear. Since then, more have been added: tentacles, hopscotch grids, environmental messages, lily pads, and more. [more inside]
posted by wintersweet on Mar 21, 2015 - 35 comments

I resented the existence of Meyer lemons & anyone who championed them.🍋

"Honestly? I've never had more fun cooking. Or eating. I didn't want to write this piece; it's almost humiliating to hear myself talk this way. But there it is. I'm in Berkeley. I'm lucky to be here. I may stay." Mark Bittman talks about California produce. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 18, 2015 - 90 comments

Rethinking the solar system

With the discovery of life beneath the Ross Ice Shelf, the abundance of water in our solar system and a huge salty ocean under Ganymede's ice, scientists are rethinking the possibilities of life on other worlds.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Mar 17, 2015 - 40 comments

Mother Nature is most ruggedly, thornily savage.

Los Angeles should be buried. [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Mar 14, 2015 - 54 comments

"If Kubla Khan built his pleasure dome in St. Francois County...

...it might look something like this." Located in Missouri, Bonne Terre was an active mine until the early 1960s. In 1980, Doug and Cathy Goergens purchased it, flooded the 88 miles of passages on its three lowest levels, and turned into a scuba diving destination. Guests can take guided diving tours along dozens of underwater trails, past mining carts and other abandoned equipment.
posted by Blue Jello Elf on Mar 11, 2015 - 18 comments

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