699 posts tagged with Web.
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please enter your phone number in the most excruciating way

How NOT to ask people to key in their phone numbers on web forms.
posted by divabat on May 1, 2016 - 84 comments

Internet -> internet

The Internet (old/current format) is blowing up at the Associated Press Stylebook announcement that as of June 1st it'll be the internet. Furthermore, Web will begin with a lower case w in all instances from the same date. One author made the case for this (Facebook picture) in 2009. However, others are disagreeing, while others are finding more to disagree on. This, of course, is all good publicity for the forthcoming product.
posted by Wordshore on Apr 2, 2016 - 107 comments

Algorithmic Education vs Indie EdTech

An algorithmic education, despite all the promises made by ed-tech entrepreneurs for “revolution” and “disruption,” is likely to re-inscribe the power relations that are already in place in school and in society. Whether it's annotating the scholarly web, creating connected copies through wikity or domain of one's own, alternatives to algorithmic education are offered by the indie edtech movement.
posted by typecloud on Feb 12, 2016 - 11 comments

The Polygon Shredder

WARNING: may induce vertigo, nausea, flashbacks, and/or mild amusement.
posted by Chrischris on Feb 10, 2016 - 9 comments

The end of online comments?

Say goodbye to online comments as you know them We have finally realized that the kind of person who devotes his day to arguing with strangers anonymously on the Internet is not necessarily representative of a large swath of public opinion or necessarily good at articulating anything. [more inside]
posted by modernnomad on Dec 22, 2015 - 103 comments

Keep on grinding

It's friday, so let's all relax with some fractal machinery.
posted by boo_radley on Dec 11, 2015 - 14 comments

oldweb.today

Surf The Old Web! [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 4, 2015 - 19 comments

Nerd nostalgia

Developments like wikis and Facebook walls and comments sections were supposed to open the Internet to everyone, “using the Web the way it’s meant to be used.” Ten years in, and it sometimes seems those technologies only opened us up: to quantification, to monetization, to tracking, to abuse. Given these rather disappointing developments, it’s little surprise that some look back at Web 1.0 with longing.

The counterintuitive, GIF-tastic plan to redeem the modern Internet (SLWaPo)
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Nov 15, 2015 - 46 comments

You can't count on the web, okay?

The web, as it appears at any one moment, is a phantasmagoria. It’s not a place in any reliable sense of the word. It is not a repository. [more inside]
posted by pjern on Oct 15, 2015 - 32 comments

Network Effect

networkeffect.io appears to be an internet art installation, with themes of connectedness and impermanence.
Caveat: Chrome only, and requires sound. Even so, worth it.
posted by ChrisR on Oct 6, 2015 - 18 comments

Connecting the dots

Discograph generates an interactive visualization of relationships between nearly 5 million artists, bands and labels, based on data from the Discogs.com database.
Examples: The Beatles | The Fall | Neil Young
posted by porn in the woods on Sep 29, 2015 - 18 comments

Replace X with Y

Here is the Chrome extension Word Replacer II, and here is the Firefox extension FoxReplace. You can use them to replace words on web pages you visit with other words of your choosing. They could be used to duplicate the action of previous extension cloud-to-butt, or you might think of other things you could do with it. There's another extension for Chrome that automatically changes all uses of "millennials" to "snake people".
posted by JHarris on Sep 15, 2015 - 40 comments

A Corpus of Corpora

corpora is a Github repository containing machine-readable lists of interesting words and phrases that "are potentially useful in the creation of weird internet stuff." The corpora range from the mundane (common English words, animals, corporations, pizza toppings) to the obscure (types of knot, wrestling moves, Lovecraftian deities) to the absurd (states of drunkenness, deceased Spinal Tap drummers, unrhymable words).
posted by schmod on Sep 12, 2015 - 40 comments

SOLO: DANG SON WHERE'D U FIND THIS? :SOLO

Do you want to go on a karaoke adventure? One that you know you have never been on? Then, go to KARAOKE_EBOOKS! [more inside]
posted by ignignokt on Sep 10, 2015 - 6 comments

This One Simple Court Case May Surprise You

The Daily Mail is suing Gawker. The Daily Mail's web wing, Mail Online, is suing Gawker for defamation over the story headlined: “My Year Ripping Off the Web with the Daily Mail Online". [more inside]
posted by Devonian on Sep 8, 2015 - 58 comments

Because the Internet needs more

Rice University Fondren Library maintain a guide to cat videos on the web. But what do they think? Meanwhile, in the UK Labour Party leadership contest, socialists cannot vote, but cats can. And people like watching cat videos on TV. And as for Tinder for cats? There's an app for that. But, why so popular? And why does Larry Ellison like them? So do you want more? Why not go on a cat holiday, or run away and join the cat circus?
posted by Wordshore on Aug 28, 2015 - 9 comments

someone in a casual setting doing a thing on their device

These are all very different services. Several of them are cool and useful, but it’s hard to tell them apart. - Send In The Clones
posted by Potomac Avenue on Aug 26, 2015 - 62 comments

Crazy like a (Fire)Fox

While it used to be the leading alternative to Internet Explorer (and others), Firefox has seen its market share erode steadily since the 2008 debut of Google Chrome. The Mozilla Foundation has made several oft-controversial bids at relevancy, including native video chat, Pocket integration, a mobile browser (and OS), a UI overhaul, and a rapid release schedule that's reached version 40 (and counting). But the latest proposal -- part of a reboot of the stalled Electrolysis multiprocessing project -- will prove the most daunting. Although it will modernize the browser's architecture, it also deprecates the longtime XUL framework in favor of more limited and Chrome-like "web extensions" -- requiring Firefox's vast catalog of powerful add-ons to be rewritten from scratch or cease functioning. While developers will have until 2017 to fully adapt, opinion is divided -- NoScript's Giorgio Maone reassures doubters, while the DownThemAll! team says "it feels like I just learned my dear old friend Firefox is going to die." [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Aug 22, 2015 - 216 comments

A QA Engineer walks into a B͏̴͡͡Ą̛Ŗ̴

The Big List of Naughty Strings is a Github repository containing a long list of hypothetical user inputs that can potentially wreck havoc on a computer program, including SQL Injection, malformed and evil HTML, stupid Unicode gimmicks, or innocuous phrases that look like profanity.
posted by schmod on Aug 21, 2015 - 27 comments

The websites you were browsing, twenty years ago

InternetDir95 is a twitter account, tweeting "Every website from the Internet International Directory, published 1995". This was the year Yahoo! was founded (March), Windows 95 was launched (August), the DVD announced (September), and ebay was founded (September). Perhaps redundantly, the twitter account profile also says "many dead links". Twitter account by Jeff Thompson.
posted by Wordshore on Aug 19, 2015 - 39 comments

A love letter to the Internet of old

Cameron's World is a web-collage of text and images excavated from the buried neighbourhoods of archived GeoCities pages (1994–2009). (music autoplays)
posted by curious nu on Aug 18, 2015 - 24 comments

Targeted Advertising Considered Harmful

"The best thing that you, as a user, can do to get better ad-supported content is to install a tracking protection tool." - Don Marti [more inside]
posted by jeffburdges on Aug 4, 2015 - 25 comments

Seriously.

The Verge's web sucks.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 29, 2015 - 80 comments

All of the commenting, none of the comments.

"When a user submits a comment, echochamber.js will save the comment to the user's LocalStorage, so when they return to the page, they can be confident that their voice is being heard, and feel engaged with your very engaging content. It does not make any HTTP requests. Since LocalStorage is only local, you and your database need not be burdened with other people's opinions."
posted by NoraReed on Jul 14, 2015 - 95 comments

The Web We Have to Save.

The Web We Have to Save. SLhoder: "The rich, diverse, free web that I loved — and spent years in an Iranian jail for — is dying. Why is nobody stopping it?" (h/t mkb, via ...uh... facebook.)
posted by advil on Jul 14, 2015 - 69 comments

*During the course of reporting this story, The Verge's parent company..

Website, profiled While the rest of the content industry on the web coalesces around platforms, The Awl chases a small, "indielectual" readership. Why are the most important people in media reading The Awl? [more inside]
posted by General Malaise on Jul 9, 2015 - 30 comments

The Cookie Conundrum

Writing at FiveThirtyEight.com, Sam Dean argues that until very recently, there has been no way to meaningfully measure web traffic. For advertisers and site owners, "just having a number that everyone can point to as an acceptable proxy of reality is more important than how accurate that number may be." [more inside]
posted by kewb on Jul 9, 2015 - 10 comments

Chill The Lion

PRESS AND DRAG TO MAKE WIND. THE LION WILL SURELY APPRECIATE.
posted by Going To Maine on Jul 3, 2015 - 24 comments

Secrets of catching attention revealed! 1,072 ‘context words’ disclosed!

The 1,072 Words That Will Forever Change How You Write Headlines. As some publishers struggle to grow their web traffic, one company believes increasing the ratio of some words in headlines could draw in readers. Researchers at native-advertising company Sharethrough say they have narrowed down a thousand words in the English language (pdf) that are proven to elicit higher emotional engagement. The research released today builds on a previous study published in March from Sharethrough and Nielsen.
posted by TheLittlePrince on Jul 2, 2015 - 46 comments

A Global Neuromancer

"I merely want to remind us that cyberspace is a literary invention and does not really exist, however much time we spend on the computer every day. There is no such space radically different from the empirical, material room we are sitting in, nor do we leave our bodies behind when we enter it, something one rather tends to associate with drugs or the rapture. But it is a literary construction we tend to believe in; and, like the concept of immaterial labor, there are certainly historical reasons for its appearance at the dawn of postmodernity which greatly transcend the technological fact of computer development or the invention of the Internet." - Fredric Jameson looks back on Neuromancer by William Gibson
posted by jammy on Jul 1, 2015 - 218 comments

“NEVER HOLD THE UMBRELLA AGAIN WHEN WEARING THE PROTECTIVE RAIN HAT.”

PROTECTIVE RAIN HAT. PATENTED. MADE IN AMERICA.
posted by overeducated_alligator on Jun 7, 2015 - 73 comments

Internet journalism and invasive surveillance

Quinn Norton is selling you out
posted by The Devil Tesla on May 29, 2015 - 37 comments

English 111 / Comp Lit 115

Experimental Writing Seminar: Constraints & Collaborations. In addition to setting out a few dozen writing exercises, the online syllabus for an introductory course taught by Charles Bernstein (poet and co-editor of L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E) links to a variety of poems, poetry generators, and prose experiments on the web. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on May 20, 2015 - 4 comments

If you are not paying for it et cetera

"Do Not Track is a personalized web series about privacy and the web economy. If you share your data with us, we'll show you what the web knows about you."
posted by no mind on Apr 21, 2015 - 36 comments

If you learn by doing, this is for you.

Code4startup is an online resource that lets you clone and hack copies of real services you already use on the web to make something new and cool You have an idea and want to quickly build your own web app for startup? Code4startup throws you into the deep end of the pool of established services, TaskRabbit, Udemy, AirBnb, Fiverr... explains how they are constructed with various technologies and then lets you bang on the code of these to make something new and cool for yourself. Angular JS, Bootstrap, Wufoo, ChromeDeveloperTools, Rails... and more to come.
posted by bobdow on Mar 26, 2015 - 36 comments

Plugging a 1986 Mac Plus into the modern Web

Kernelmag's Jeff Keacher documents connecting his old Macintosh Plus to the World Wibe Web, courtesy of a Raspberry Pi and a bunch of software to remove all those pesky <div>s and such. [more inside]
posted by thegears on Mar 23, 2015 - 23 comments

The Wheels of (the Department of) Justice Turn Slowly

The Department of Justice has postponed its NPRM on the accessibility requirements of websites for places of public accommodations under Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, from March 2015 to June 2015. The NPRM for accessibility requirements of government websites was due in December 2014. [more inside]
posted by johnofjack on Mar 9, 2015 - 11 comments

BuzzFeed's self-congratulatory Dutch oven

"Or don’t. But please. Detox. Throw your phone in the fucking East River. DELETE YOUR TWITTER." The Concessionist, an advice column for the Awl written by Choire Sicha, fields "the letter that encapsulates the millennial age": I Hate Myself Because I Don't Work For BuzzFeed. [more inside]
posted by naju on Mar 7, 2015 - 35 comments

People Who Could Really Break the Internet

People Who Could Really Break the Internet
posted by MattMangels on Mar 6, 2015 - 31 comments

"The accuracy of the sea came at the cost of the land."

That’s how I feel about the web these days. We have a map, but it’s not for me. So I am distanced. It feels like things are distorted. I am consistently confused. — Frank Chimero, on What Screens Want
posted by iamkimiam on Mar 5, 2015 - 31 comments

From Grad School to The Atlantic: Public Discourse & Comment Sections

Anyone who writes articles on the web knows the maxim: "Don’t read the comments." Fortunately for Yoni Appelbaum, a recent Ph.D. in history from Brandeis University, the well-known writer Ta-Nehisi Coates routinely ignores that rule.
How a history Ph.D. who was on the tenure-track market ended up in with a pretty good gig in journalism, primarily because of the quality of his comments.
posted by Toekneesan on Feb 27, 2015 - 8 comments

FCC votes for Net Neutrality

When President Obama appointed Tom Wheeler (a former top telecom lobbyist) as chairman of the FCC, he got a lot of grief for selling out his '07 pledge to protect Net Neutrality -- the founding principle long prized by open web activists that ISPs cannot privilege certain data over others, without which dire visions of a tiered and pay-for-play internet loomed. Earlier, weaker attempts at net neutrality had failed in court, and the new chairman looked set to fold. But after an unprecedented outcry following last year's trial balloon for ISP "fast lanes" -- including a viral appeal by John Oliver, a public urging by the president, and perhaps Wheeler's own history with the pre-web NABU Network -- the FCC yesterday voted along party lines to enact the toughest net neutrality rules in history, classifying ISPs as common carriers and clearing the way for municipal broadband. ISPs reacted with (Morse) venom, while congressional Republicans are divided over what they called "Obamacare for the internet."
posted by Rhaomi on Feb 27, 2015 - 127 comments

LMGTFY

What happens when you type google.com into your browser and press enter? [I]nstead of the usual story, we're going to try to answer this question in as much detail as possible. No skipping out on anything.
posted by Cash4Lead on Jan 20, 2015 - 66 comments

NEON GLITCHY PIXART MADNESS

It's gloriously incomprehensible and very Japanese, but still: BUGGG, a game, or rather several games. (Requires Unity) [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Jan 17, 2015 - 12 comments

an impossibly large, semi-persistent realm of items

If you’ve ever said, “markets are conversations” you’re quoting the words of The Cluetrain Manifesto, the ’90s-era opus on the promise of the Web [previously]. David Weinberger and Doc Searls (two of the original authors of Cluetrain) are publishing another provocative work today called New Clues. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Jan 8, 2015 - 61 comments

2014: a lot of people on the internet said a lot of things about comics

The Best Comics Commentary of 2014
posted by Artw on Dec 10, 2014 - 36 comments

How big is space? Interactive views of the universe in varying scales

We know space is big, but trying to understand how big is tricky. Say you stare up at the sky and identify stars and constellations in a virtual planetarium, you can't quite fathom how far away all those stars are (previously, twice). Even if you could change your point of view and zoom around in space to really see 100,000 nearby stars (autoplaying ambient music, and there are actually 119,617 stars mapped in 3D space), it's still difficult to get a sense of scale. There's this static image of various items mapped on a log scale from XKCD (previously), and an interactive horizontal journey down from the sun to the heliosphere with OMG Space (previously). You can get a bit more dynamic with this interactive Scale of the Universe webpage (also available in with some variants, if you want the sequel [ previously, twice], the swirly, gravity-optional version that takes some time to load, and the wrong version [previously]), but that's just for the scale of objects, not of space itself. If you want to get spaced out, imagine if If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel, and travel from there (previously). This past March, BBC Future put out a really big infographic, which also takes a moment to load, but then you can see all sorts of things, from the surface of Earth out to the edge of our solar system.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 4, 2014 - 31 comments

Let's build a browser engine!

Matt Brubeck is building a toy HTML rendering engine, and he thinks you should too.
posted by boo_radley on Nov 5, 2014 - 9 comments

Let me tell you about being publicly separated from your truth.

"But having survived myself, what I want to do now is help other victims of the shame game survive too. I want to put my suffering to good use and give purpose to my past."
Monica Lewinsky gives her first major public speech to speak out against online abuse. Full transcript here.
posted by iamkimiam on Oct 22, 2014 - 51 comments

The Internet has been bitten by POODLE

POODLE (Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption) is the latest exploit found in SSL, a protocol used widely across the Internet for secure connections. Engineers at Google discovered the exploit, and they have written a white paper discussing it. In response, Google is disabling SSL in all Google products. Some are calling this the death of SSL. For web users, disabling SSL in your browser is recommended. Here is a tool to identify if your browser is potentially affected by the POODLE exploit.
posted by deathpanels on Oct 16, 2014 - 97 comments

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