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"Be excellent to each other" is not a code of conduct

Why Silicon Valley Needs The Coder Grrrls Of Double Union, The Feminist Hacker Space
The lack of women in the tech world isn't just a pipeline problem--it's one of rampant sexism. Enter the haven of Double Union.
[more inside]
posted by Lexica on Jul 23, 2014 - 77 comments

Yummy tail sez the ourobouros

Musings on, in the age of digitization and photocopies and the dying off of old collectors, what it means to be a book collector by Johan Kugelberg of Boo-Hooray (the guy who cataloged Afrika Bambaataa's collection for Cornell University, and I can't believe there isn't a Previously for that!) [more inside]
posted by larrybob on Jun 11, 2014 - 4 comments

They Wrote About Marcel Proust Wrote About

Between 1994 and 1998, P. Segal edited a zine about Marcel Proust called Proust Said That. [more inside]
posted by GenjiandProust on Jun 22, 2013 - 9 comments

Stop, collate and listen

Ever wondered what the physical production of a minicomic or zine is like? Jim Rugg provides a guided tour.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 27, 2012 - 4 comments

Get out there and bother each other! That’s what it’s all about.

Legendary curmudgeonly rockist Athens GA music zine Chunklet is still around, and teaming up with Vice magazine to bring you such new Classics of argument-fomentation as The Wheel Of Punk™ (and the Wheel of Punk™ in action). [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 11, 2012 - 9 comments

RIP Bill Brent

Bill Brent was the publisher of the zine Black Sheets and the alternative sexuality directory The Black Book and the author of the book How To Make a Zine (recently republished in a revised edition) as well as a lot of erotica writing. He was very active in the San Francisco Bay Area sexuality, kink, and zine scenes from the early 90s onward. Unfortunately, he committed suicide in August 2012; Liz Highleyman penned an in-depth obituary of Bill.
posted by larrybob on Aug 30, 2012 - 13 comments

High Weirdness By Mail

"I guess it started for me when, as a young sci-fi movie fan, I did a fanzine at age 12 to 15... that’s when I learned how relatively cheap and easy it was to self-publish, at least for a small circle of weirdos. Later, after comics went up to 50¢, I started collecting stuff equally weird but much cheaper than comic books: kook literature." - Rev. Ivan Stang

You may know of the Church of the SubGenius, that parody religion that worships the almighty "Bob" and was a fixture of MTV and Night Flights back in the day. But do you know of its SECRET ORIGINS? Co-founder Ivan Stang corresponded with hundreds of "mad prophets, crackpots, kooks & true visionaries," from sincere cults to winking charlatans to utter nutjobs to hate groups to independent artists and musicians, with some respected names thrown in, and synthesized them into a half-joking, half-serious celebration of the kook spirit. These days of course the forward-thinking crackpot looking for sheep goes directly to the internet. But while it lasted Stang and co-authors Mike Gunderloy, Waver Forest and Mark Johnston collaborated to document this vanished scene in the legendary book HIGH WEIRDNESS BY MAIL. (All links within may quickly lead someplace NSFW by the nature of the beast.) [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Aug 27, 2012 - 133 comments

Little Magazines

Beginning in the 1910s, a combination of new ideas and technologies generated a proliferation of little magazines. These magazines made possible the revolutionary movement known as modernism. Little magazines promoted artistic and political movements ranging from Imagism, Futurism, Cubism, Surrealism, and Dada, to Anarchism, Socialism, Communism, and Feminism. Little magazines provided a stage for modernist innovations ranging from New Art and the New Music, to the New Negro and the New Woman. Little magazines championed individual liberties ranging from free verse, to free speech, and free love. Today, we are using the World Wide Web to produce a database dedicated to these important periodicals.
posted by latkes on Apr 23, 2012 - 11 comments

Animals Talking in All Caps

Sometimes animals talk in ALL CAPS. [more inside]
posted by pts on Nov 28, 2011 - 49 comments

It gets better.

In the waning hours of National Coming Out Day, this 1976 pamphlet, "Growing Up Gay" [pdf] was a publication of Youth Liberation of Ann Arbor, MI (1970-1979). This collection of coming-out stories also advises young readers, in the years before the ascendancy of GSAs, on how to start "gay groups" at their schools and in their communities. [more inside]
posted by liketitanic on Oct 11, 2011 - 6 comments

Didier Lestrade: Gays are forgetting their history

Butt (previously) interviews Didier Lestrade, former publisher of classic French gay zines and periodicals like Magazine (scanned archives) and Têtu. “Unlike many young fags today, we knew our gay history. We were learning all the time about all kinds of stuff and we were always eager to lean more…. It freaks me out to think how quickly we went from creating our own history to not caring about gay history anymore! It happened so fast. No one has even begun to collect and preserve all the material from the Paradise Garage, the Saint, etc., and now gay people don’t seem to even care.” [more inside]
posted by joeclark on Jan 7, 2011 - 31 comments

Z for Zine Editor

The early days of british comics fanzines, by Dez Skinn, one time head of Marvel UK and founder of Warrior.
posted by Artw on Aug 26, 2010 - 3 comments

APAs: Pre-Internet Communication

Before the internet, nerds communicated through Amateur Press Associations (APAs). Members wrote and photocopied their individual 'zines on a subject, then mailed them to a central mailer, who collated and mailed the completed sets to all the members. The earliest APAs were founded by printers and amateur journalists. The National Amateur Press Association is the oldest, founded in 1876. Later APAs were often the province of science fiction and comic book fans. They are still around [pdf]. A lot more inside... [more inside]
posted by marxchivist on Aug 2, 2010 - 12 comments

"Three pounds forty and some tobacco"

The complete archive of International Times, which launched a revolution in underground publishing in the UK and paved the way for Oz (of the School Kids special fame) (previously) and a whole string of british underground zines, a heritage that Alan Moores new zine Dodgem Logic very much calls upon.
posted by Artw on Dec 27, 2009 - 8 comments

Zines!

The Zine Library has hundreds of zines in pdf format for your perusal. They are organized into categories ranging from the common political (anarchism, political prisoners & animal liberation) and identity based zines (indigenous, race & gender) to the more esoteric (anarchist history, primitivism & theory) as well as the useful (cooking, DIY & organizing manuals) and arty (art, comics & music). Now, zines are by their very nature hit and miss but there are some real treasures to be found. I recommend these three: [all links pdf] The Rebel's Dark Laughter - The Writings of Bruno Filippi, Barefoot in the Kitchen and Delivery from Below, Resistance from Above - Electricity and the Politics of Struggle in Tembisa, South Africa. Note: Many if not most zines are set up to be printed out and bound together in chapbooks. That requires a bit of going back and forth when reading in pdf-format, but they wouldn't be real zines if they were straightforward to read ;) Don't know what a zine is? A pretty good overview is provided by zine librarian Jenna Freedman in Zines Are Not Blogs: A Not Unbiased Analysis. [This site has been posted previously but was buried deep in the weeds of more inside]
posted by Kattullus on Mar 10, 2009 - 16 comments

the small science collective

The Small Science Collective creates mini-zines about SCIENCE. Each zine downloads as a PDF. Learn about DNA computing, rediscover cephalopods, or host a bot fly. More information is available on the collective's accompanying blog. (via)
posted by Korou on Feb 5, 2009 - 6 comments

Don't You Wish You Could Draw

Chicago jam-comics group Trubble Club boasts an all-star line-up of amazing illustrators, collectively creating surreal, hilarious and somewhat disturbing comics. [more inside]
posted by 235w103 on Nov 14, 2008 - 7 comments

Exploration Baltimore

The yearly Best of Baltimore awards released by Baltimore City Paper have been providing a guide to Charm City for over a decade. You can find the best independent bookstores, theater, nachos, and plumbers. Or perhaps your tastes run more exotic--do you need the best constant reminder that Peter Angelos is the anti-Christ? The best place to get run over by bicyclists while hiking? Or the best place to make fun of stressed-out PreMeds? And there are always surprising picks; for example, check out the 2006 winner for best cheap entertainment. So when you're planning your next Baltimore visit browse the archives and find somewhere to enjoy yourself.
posted by schroedinger on Feb 7, 2008 - 23 comments

Read classic punk 'zines, without the inky fingers!

Read classic punk 'zines, without the inky fingers! Too young to have read the first issue of Flipside? Need confirmation that Maximum Rock 'N' Roll was just as boring (does/did anyone actually read those MRR Scene Reports?) and elitist back then as it is now? Do you find it hard to believe that Soul Asylum used to be credible enough to be interviewed by Suburban Voice? Or maybe you just want to marvel/feel-sad-for the obviously painstaking effort someone went through to scan every single page of these 'zines (including HeartattaCk) into PDFs? Well here 'ya go.
posted by melorama on May 23, 2007 - 25 comments

How Tos now on Fecal Face

I've linked their site before, but now Fecal Face has instructional How Tos: Stuff a Mouse, Make an Oil Painting, Screen Print a Poster, Make a Mini-Comic/Zine. The site has many other features as well but remember that where there's art, the occasional nsfw image may wait, brooding.
posted by dobbs on Jul 27, 2006 - 9 comments

Breaking Up The Band

Breaking Up The Band [via mefi projects]
posted by Captaintripps on Nov 29, 2005 - 11 comments

subsystence.net

Subsystence.net A virtual cornucopia of thought-provoking writing, art, and music - subsystence is one of my favorite e-zines. Now in its fifth issue, with outstanding features such as a series of paintings by Chicago artist Nick Butcher and music by Detalles.
posted by chrisege on May 5, 2005 - 2 comments

Xerox stains on yr fingers

Flipside No. 1. Before MTV and Vans got ahold of it, this is what punk rock looked like: Tiny, grimy, Xeroxed and rad. Tip o' the hat to the Boingstaz and our own Mr. Bali Hai
posted by arto on Jan 29, 2005 - 6 comments

The Golden Age of Zines

Beer Frame and Dishwasher and Murder Can Be Fun. My top 3 Zines of all time (here's a list of more). There was a used record/comics store near where I worked. They had lots of Zines and I would frequent them just to see if new issues were in. Weeks of waiting were sometimes rewarded with a new issue. Almost always worth the wait. Anyone have a favorite? Any good Zines around anymore? [more inside]
posted by e40 on Nov 30, 2004 - 37 comments

Goodbye, Yellow Brick Road

Hippie Atrocities and Beautiful Freaks -- Oz Magazine was, for a ten year run during the Sixties and Seventies, Australia's, and later England's, premier underground satire 'zine. Featuring contributions from (among others) Lenny Bruce and Germain Greere, and subject to two obscenity trials--one in Australia and another, more famous one following the editors' exile to England--it evolved, in its English incarnation, a wicked, witty and of course, thouroughly psychedelic design aesthetic. There are galleries of cover art here and here, and a Shockwave adaptation of the infamous School Kids issue here. [warning: some images NSFW.]
posted by arto on Aug 26, 2003 - 6 comments

Found Magazine

Found Magazine is worth a look. It documents the detrital scraps of our modern lives, found in gutters, break-room bulletin boards and under car windshields. All pieces are reader submitted, and some are of suspect authenticity. Sublime, simply sublime... PS. Page me later
posted by cadastral on Jan 27, 2003 - 11 comments

Zines

Before there were blogs, before there was the Web, there were zines. Most MeFi folk know this - right? - but it seems to be astonishing news to the Washington Post. Maybe not everybody here was part of the zine scene back in the 80s and early 90s, but I bet a lot of you were. My question: Am I just an out-of-touch curmudgeon or is it insulting to do an article like this on a "Zine Guide" (which I haven't seen - I haven't touched a zine in about five years, probably) without even mentioning the Alpha and Omega of the genre, Mike Gunderloy's Factsheet Five?
posted by soyjoy on Nov 19, 2002 - 48 comments

Duplex Planet

Duplex Planet, David Greenberger's legendary zine which has spawned books, CDs, comic books, and videos, finally went online sometime this year. "In the universal experience of aging we are desperately short of meaningful guidance. The Duplex Planet offers some lessons and examples," says Greenberger. Does he succeed, or is DP just an artful "seniors say the darndest things"?
posted by kmel on Sep 18, 2002 - 8 comments

projet MOBILIVRE-BOOKMOBILE projet

projet MOBILIVRE-BOOKMOBILE projet is a collection of independently-produced books and zines traveling and exhibiting across North America in a vintage Airstream trailer. The project is accepting submissions for the 2002 tour.
posted by sudama on Jan 16, 2002 - 4 comments

Creem Magazine

Creem Magazine is back. After an 8-year hiatus, the classic rock rag that launched the career of editor/author/Springsteen-worshipper Dave Marsh, elevated Lester Bangs to rockcrit boddhisatva status, and introduced me to the Velvet Underground and the Stooges is online and ready to roll the presses once more. Will they give a much-needed kick in the ass to a moribund field of journalism, or are they a bunch of old hippies cynically cashing in on Cameron Crowe's Almost Famous vibe? Don't forget to dig the scanned covers. Boy Howdy!
posted by MrBaliHai on Nov 29, 2001 - 10 comments

Is "me-zine" the new 'blog?

Is "me-zine" the new 'blog? Or is it just when traditional journalists do it? And is this whole thing now "legit"? [via medianews]
posted by owillis on Jul 9, 2001 - 22 comments

Webzines.

Webzines. Independent magazines published on the web in the same vein as "old school" printed ones. Sort of the step between a blog and a full blown Salon (as in MetaFocus?). I'm thinking about doing one, any you can recommend?
posted by owillis on Jul 6, 2001 - 16 comments

Maybe I spoke too soon.

Maybe I spoke too soon. A lot of semipro tech-zines, sort of like blogs except with specific subject matters to cover, are financed by ad networks. In the recent past a bunch of them have lost their funding when their ad networks went out of business. Now one of the biggest networks which remains is changing their terms to the detriment of the web sites. I gather that a lot of the ad networks were running at a loss, and of course new funding has dried up. [more inside]
posted by Steven Den Beste on Jan 5, 2001 - 6 comments

Happy birthday.

Happy birthday.
posted by solistrato on Sep 22, 2000 - 4 comments

Video killed the weblogging star.

Video killed the weblogging star. Turns out ABC is casting for a tv show about the fast-moving world of online zines. But don't they know that webzines are oh-so September 1996, and weblogs are where it's at these days? Doesn't somebody around here think it's time to migrate the weblog genre over to television? Any of you crazy New York based webloggers thinking about making the move over to a different medium?
posted by monstro on May 2, 2000 - 30 comments

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