Join 3,516 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

5 posts tagged with akirakurosawa. (View popular tags)
Displaying 1 through 5 of 5. Subscribe:

García Márquez and Kurosawa.

In October 1990, Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez visited Tokyo during the shooting of Akira Kurosawa’s penultimate feature, Rhapsody in August. García Márquez, who spent some years in Bogota as a film critic before penning landmark novels such as One Hundred Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera, spoke with Kurosawa for over six hours on a number of subjects.
posted by shakespeherian on Jul 19, 2014 - 8 comments

Brian de Palma!

At the end of your Bollywood comedy you have an item song that's supposed to be a tribal song with gibberish lyrics, so why not just list film directors' names? Cue, The Akira Kurosawa song
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Apr 24, 2012 - 25 comments

Drunken Angel vs. Drunken Angel

I have seen the future of rock n roll + cinema and it is 4-minute mashups that span eras and genres and continents and cultures. Although it's hard to imagine any others can reach this level of awesome: Akira Kurosawa vs. Lucinda Williams. Drunken Angel vs. Drunken Angel. SLYT
posted by ecourbanist on May 30, 2011 - 7 comments

Chasing Light, a photography blog

Between the art nudes and fashion shots, Doug Kim's Chasing Light photography blog (front page mildly NSFW, archives more-so) is fast becoming a secret museum of photography with examples and insightful quotes from great photographers. One need go back only as far as December for posts on Dennis Hopper's photography, Cartier-Bresson, Mary Ellen Mark's on set photography, Annie Liebovitz on Hunter S. Thompson, Jousef Koudelka on The Soviet invasion of Prague, Robert Frank's visit to London and Wales, and Akira Kurosawa's group compositions in Seven Samurai.
posted by nthdegx on Jun 1, 2010 - 11 comments

To Live

American audiences remember Akira Kurosawa as the genius of the samurai epic, a past master who used the form both to revise and revive Western classics - Shakespeare with Ran and Throne of Blood, Dostoevsky with Red Beard and The Idiot, Gorky with The Lower Depths - and to give splendid and ultimately immortal life to new archetypes, as in The Seven Samurai, Rashomon, Yojimbo. But Kurosawa also made films of his own time. His masterpiece, in fact, was the quiet story of a gray Japanese bureaucrat dying in post-war Tokyo, and of his attempt to do something of lasting good before he leaves. The film is Ikiru ("To Live"; 1952). [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jan 29, 2008 - 46 comments

Page: 1