Skip

1500 posts tagged with animation.
Displaying 101 through 150 of 1500. Subscribe:

The Parallax Effect: Bringing still images to pseudo-life

The "2.5D" Parallax Effect: How To Animate a Photo provides a quick tutorial of the methods used to animate still images, as seen in the documentary The Kid Stays in the Picture (see the trailer for some fleeting examples), and clearly employed by this video that utilized only images from the World Wildlife Foundation's photo archives. The technique is also used in what appears to be more standard animation, as seen in this thesis animation project from Arquis B. Silp, and this animation by Frederic Kokott (look behind the scenes). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 20, 2014 - 22 comments

"All I got right now is this box of one dozen starving, crazed weasels."

Weird Al Yankovic's ridiculous 11-minute epic musical saga ALBUQUERQUE:
Animated in Flash
Mashed up with scenes from Breaking Bad
With lyrics
Bonus: Everything You Know Is Wrong [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Jan 19, 2014 - 39 comments

Jupiter in motion, as photographed and drawn from Earth

Redditor bubbleweed took a five and half hour time-lapse of Jupiter, and made this gif to show Jupiter from Io's frame of reference [WARNING: 4.6mb GIF | alternate: 60kb HTML5 video]. But why simply photograph Jupiter, when you can take the time to really know the planet and draw it, repeatedly, as Frédéric Burgeot has done. His work included a flat texture map* which Pascal Chauvet turned into an animated version of Jupiter (Vimeo). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 14, 2014 - 21 comments

Junk Head 1 - a short by Yamiken Hori

Junk Head 1 - Start with the stop motion animation look of an old Tool video, add in a bit of that Jeunet/Caro style humanity and humor, weave in some Cronenberg-like WTF creatures, and wrap the whole thing in an interesting story, and you have yourself a very cool short from Yamiken Hori.
posted by chambers on Jan 12, 2014 - 8 comments

A surreal, musical film about understanding time.

Don't Hug Me I'm Scared II
posted by dobbs on Jan 6, 2014 - 22 comments

Welcome to ISIS!

In this series of ISIS orientation films, Dr. Krieger will be answering frequently asked questions from new team members. Season five of Archer premieres Monday, January 13th on FX. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Jan 3, 2014 - 35 comments

The cold never bothered me anyway

Disney's FROZEN: How one simple suggestion broke the ice on the Snow Queen's decades-long story problem
posted by crossoverman on Dec 31, 2013 - 145 comments

Cool Science GIFs in 2013

"If a picture’s worth a thousand words, a GIF is easily worth a million. The file format—which uses a series of images to produce a looping video, like a flip book—is a tremendous way to convey all sorts of moving wonders. ... It’s appropriate, then, that we use the GIF to explore some of the coolest, weirdest, most remarkable science stories of 2013. What follows is a non-exhaustive list of amazing science GIFs from 2013, in no particular order." [more inside]
posted by SpacemanStix on Dec 27, 2013 - 21 comments

Wait, what was that about the Holocaust?

Back in 08', filmcow.com, the people behind Charlie The Unicorn and other such Internet nonsense, released a darling little video about adorable singing ferrets signing about the things they love, "Make Me Smile!"
posted by The Whelk on Dec 26, 2013 - 12 comments

A Bear Called Paddington, from darkest Peru to TV (and the internet)

It all started on Christmas Eve 1965 (Google books preview), as a cold and wet Michael Bond was doing some last minute shopping. He had missed a bus, and ducked inside a department store to get out of the sleet. It was there that he saw a small bear, all alone on a shelf. On a whim, he picked it up as a stocking stuffer for his wife. The couple named him after the Paddington railway station that was near where they lived at the time. A few months later, Bond turned to Paddington to break his writers block, and the Paddington books were born. Paddington was turned into the UK's favorite animated character thanks to the 56 five-minute long episodes and three longer specials that were originally aired in the 1970s and 1980s, and are online in one form or another. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 25, 2013 - 39 comments

...and then "some clown invented the printed circuit."

During the 1950's, Wernher von Braun served as technical adviser for three space-related television films produced by Disney: Man in Space, Man and the Moon and Mars and Beyond. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 24, 2013 - 40 comments

Born sinner, the opposite of a winner

Why is there Poverty? An Animated History. From WhyPoverty.net. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Dec 19, 2013 - 5 comments

Noclip

"Noclip" is a fake trailer, for a movie that, for now, is not going to be made, about the incredible power of its characters to defy the physics of the world they live in, almost as if they were cheating a videogame.
posted by Lorc on Dec 18, 2013 - 30 comments

Would you believe...

What do you need to be an international CONTROL super spy fighting the forces of KAOS? A Shoe-Phone. A Cone of Silence. A Bulletproof Invisible Wall and a Laser Blazer. Then, and only then, can you Get Smart. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 16, 2013 - 52 comments

"O Pruney Night, the stars are slightly wrinkled"

Presenting Will Vinton's Emmy-award winning A Claymation Christmas Celebration (1987) [more inside]
posted by IvoShandor on Dec 16, 2013 - 19 comments

Wicked and fantastic Stop Motion Animation

Beats Antique "Beelzebub" (feat. Les Claypool)
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Dec 15, 2013 - 12 comments

Stop Motion

Making Of The Bear and The Hare - For the John Lewis Christmas advert Hornet/Blinkink directors Elliot Dear and Yves Geleyn took the two most traditional and time-honored animation processes – stop-motion and traditional hand-drawn 2D animation – and combined them to create something innovative and unique.
posted by Wolfdog on Dec 10, 2013 - 13 comments

This is the Way I Love

Ellie Castellanos is a severely autistic thirteen year old artist whose prolific drawn art, animation, films, photographs and clay sculptures all share a distinctly colorful, vibrant and upbeat style. Her mother maintains an online gallery of her work, as well as sharing her story as it develops on the site and in a blog. She has also notably used Rickrolling as inspiration to create beautiful art. [more inside]
posted by byanyothername on Dec 9, 2013 - 5 comments

WIND

WIND is an animated short about the daily life of people living in a windy area who seem helplessly exposed to the weather. However, the inhabitants have learned to deal with their difficult living conditions. The wind creates a natural system for living.
posted by sweetkid on Dec 7, 2013 - 10 comments

Mad Love

Chris Sims examines Harley Quinn, one of the most misused and misunderstood characters in comics, taking in her Batman:The Animated Series debut played by Arleen Sorkin (audio), through to The Batman Adventures: Mad Love and the New 52 incarnation which recently drew ire with a controversial try-out page for artists.
posted by Artw on Dec 6, 2013 - 40 comments

במבי

Bambi's Jewish Roots [more inside]
posted by overeducated_alligator on Dec 4, 2013 - 17 comments

No Relation to Ren & Stimpy's Log

"Yule Log 2.0 re-imagines the traditional Video Yule Log* through a collection of short videos by illustrators, animators, directors, and creative coders (66 collaborators making 55 segments). With the controls in the upper-right corner, you can fit a continuous loop of one or all of the videos in a browser window or full-screen.
*First televised in 1966 by New York's WPIX-TV to provide its audience with some pleasant, noncommercial viewing on the holiday (and most of the broadcast crew some time off)
posted by oneswellfoop on Dec 4, 2013 - 13 comments

I’ve Created a Muenster

The Bob's Burgers Experiment is a blog that documents one guy's ongoing attempt to devise recipes for and cook every pun-laden Burger of the Day featured on the show.
posted by schmod on Dec 3, 2013 - 55 comments

The Strongest Girl in the World

Hayao Miyazaki drawn Concept sketches and storyboards for a proposed but never made 1971 Pippi Longstocking animated movie. The movie was abandoned when Astrid Lindgren didn't give her permission.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 28, 2013 - 23 comments

Stop-Frame Animation and body art that will blow your mind.

Ruby by Emma Allen - The short film depicts the transition from living, to death, to eternity and reincarnation with some very impressive face painting make-up, which took Emma five days to apply. This is one of the most creative pieces of art I've seen in a long time.
posted by GrooveJedi on Nov 26, 2013 - 6 comments

Can't Put a Lid On It

What Combat Feels Like, Presented in the Style of a Graphic Novel. An animated film based on a true story by Iraq veteran Colby Buzzell (previously).
posted by cenoxo on Nov 19, 2013 - 23 comments

Blade Runner in 12,000 animated watercolor paintings

"I've seen things that you wouldn't believe."
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Nov 18, 2013 - 39 comments

So It All Began With a Giant Lion Turtle and a Guy Named Wan.

Beginnings: Part 1 and Beginnings: Part 2, aired as episodes 19 and 20 in the second season or Book Two of the animated show Avatar: Legend of Korra, and represented a shift from the show's straight forward animation to a style that embraced the aesthetic of traditional East Asian ink drawing/painting and symbolism with a dash of Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli charm to tell the background story of the Avatar figure. The result is incredible. [more inside]
posted by Atreides on Nov 14, 2013 - 62 comments

Metafilter: Everything has a point

The Point! (1971) is the animated TV adaptation of singer/songwriter Harry Nilsson's fable about a boy named Oblio, the only round-headed person in the Pointed Village, where by law everyone and everything had to have a point. Despite his round head, Oblio has many friends. But an evil count, jealous that Oblio is more popular than his own son, says that without a pointed head, Oblio is an outlaw. Along with his faithful dog Arrow, Oblio is exiled to the Pointless Forest. There, he has many fantastic experiences (including encounters with a 3-headed man, giant bees, a tree in the leaf-selling business, and a good-humored old rock). From his adventures, Oblio learns that it is not at all necessary to be pointed to have a point in life. Directed by Fred Wolf and narrated by Ringo Starr, the film features all the original songs from Nilsson's album of the same name. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Nov 12, 2013 - 41 comments

Portrait - Autoportrait

In 2009, on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of the Child, filmmaker Gilles Porte had children between the ages of 3 and 6, who have yet learn to read or write, and from around the world, draw themselves, without adult intervention, on a pane of glass. The result of which is this gallery of 80 self-portraits, that are in turn sweet, comical, and moving. At the end of each movie, the character drawn is animated and comes to life. (To play the movies, click on “voir” below each thumbnail image on the TV5 site.) [more inside]
posted by MelanieL on Nov 11, 2013 - 3 comments

Well, I got $5.45 and it's 5:45

From Brad Neely comes a brand-new character and a brand-new rap: Queeblo, starring in Whopper and a Forty.
posted by Rory Marinich on Nov 11, 2013 - 34 comments

Forward March, and other animations from the ESMA arts school

Forward March (YouTube) is a silly little animated film, featuring four formal British military men and a furry fellow who emerges from the sewer. This short is one of the graduation pieces (Google auto-translate; original link) from the French arts school, ESMA (official French site). You can find more short animations on their YouTube and Vimeo accounts.
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 8, 2013 - 5 comments

Apparently there are a lot of video games based on this novel

On Megami Tensei:
Based on the Japanese horror novel series by Aya Nishitani, this one’s about a student computer genius, who’s also the reincarnation of an ancient Japanese deity, who uses his giant clunky 80s mainframe to summon up some horrifying devils. This involves some not-bad animation of a well-endowed teacher’s frilly brassiere heaving up and down as she becomes the conduit for horrifying monsters from another dimension to invade our world. Then giant piles of red goop start crushing students and a big blue hairy devil named Loki fights our student computer genius hero, who fights back with his reincarnated girlfriend and his magic sword and his pet devil animal throughout several alternate universes.
let's anime presents: The Top Ten Least essential OVA (anime) of the 80s. [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Nov 3, 2013 - 35 comments

The door flew open, in he ran, the tall long-legged Scissors-Man!

Shockheaded Peter (Struwwelpeter, Wikipedia), the classic 19th century German children's book of cautionary tales and grim fates, has been brought to deranged life through simple yet strange animation. [more inside]
posted by BiggerJ on Nov 3, 2013 - 26 comments

The New America

Every frame of "The New America" was laser engraved into a block of maple then photographed.
posted by brundlefly on Nov 1, 2013 - 17 comments

G.I. Jane (Fill Me Up)

An anonymous female protagonist takes on a phallic army in Mrzyk & Moriceau’s erogenous epic [caution: auto-play video, *deeply* NSFW] for Jackson and His Computerband.
posted by Mooseli on Nov 1, 2013 - 19 comments

Animated GIFs and other art from Matthew DiVito

Matthew DiVito is a motion graphics designer and an aspiring game developer, whose current specialty is animated GIFs that are hypnotic and beautiful. You can see a series of his animations on his Tumblr and a few individual works on Cargo Collective, which has a few of his short videos from Vimeo
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 31, 2013 - 8 comments

Snow White in Auschwitz

"Knowing of Dina's artistic ability, Freddy asked her to paint a mural on the wall of the barracks to cheer up the children. She agreed, although she expected she would be executed if the Germans caught her. This was some time if February 1944. Using paints that were smuggled from various sources, Dina set to work painting a scene of Snow White looking out over the Swiss countryside. Dina knew that some of the children had seen the movie and would recognize the character. She had seen the movie 'seven times in a row' back in Czechoslovakia."

The amazing, sad, triumphant story of Dina Babbitt (née Gottliebová)—artist, animator, concentration camp survivor. [more inside]
posted by Atom Eyes on Oct 30, 2013 - 36 comments

An animator explains why she studies physics

After all, she's not just sitting here doing nothing.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Oct 27, 2013 - 9 comments

MY CAR

Don't you just hate it when you're late for meeting after going to the store?
posted by griphus on Oct 25, 2013 - 83 comments

"Really Rosie"

In 1975, CBS aired the half hour animated special "Really Rosie" with story and lyrics by Maurice Sendak (based on five of his children's books) and with music composed and performed by Carole King. Many have fond memories of the broadcast ("Chicken Soup with Rice" is a particular childhood earworm), and though it has yet to make it to DVD, you can watch it in full on YouTube. The special was later turned into an Off-Broadway production in 1980 and continues to be performed by kids across the country.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 22, 2013 - 34 comments

Mickey Mouse and friends, brought back to the 1930s era sense of humor

Mickey Mouse in Ghoul Friend is a new Disney short, featuring the reanimated corpse of Goofy. With this information, you might get the idea that this is not what you might expect from modern Disney cartoons, and you'd be right. It's one of 19 new shorts that are part of the new Mickey Mouse series of shorts that are inspired by the 1930s era Disney shorts. If you'd like to see more, 11 of the shorts are currently available to view on YouTube (in a playlist with two bonus behind the scenes clips), from the DisneyShorts YouTube acccount. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 19, 2013 - 33 comments

The Faces of Archer

While many of the characters on Archer may appear to be based on their voice actors, in reality, the models used were often people known or met in unexpected ways by the producers. Here are the actual models and the stories behind how they got involved. [previously]
posted by quin on Oct 18, 2013 - 20 comments

What if it decides to fire?

Полигон (Polygon), also called Firing Range, is a Soviet short film from 1977. It concerns a tank that is able to read the brain impulses of enemy soldiers, and the man who designed it. The generals have great plans for this tank, but the designer, and the tank, have other plans. [more inside]
posted by jiawen on Oct 17, 2013 - 13 comments

Zach Dougherty, making reality less stable with animated GIFs

Zach Dougherty's hateplow tumblr is a surreal collection of looping animations, of distorted sculptures and glitches in reality.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 15, 2013 - 23 comments

Jake Fried: Hand-Drawn Experimental Animations

Down Into Nothing | Jake Fried. 2013. Hand-drawn animation with ink, gouache, white-out and coffee (previously)
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Oct 14, 2013 - 3 comments

Don't antagonize the dog.

Carpark is a cute little animation which reveals the dangers of teasing a dog locked in a car. [slyt | via]
posted by quin on Oct 14, 2013 - 8 comments

Danger is his first name

Danger Mouse (previously), Count Duckula, and Victor and Hugo were three of the many very silly, very British cartoons created by the Manchester-based Cosgrove Hall animation studio. First airing in the 1980s and early '90s, each of the shows were chock-full of wordplay, bad puns, absurd humour, and general zaniness. The studio stopped making original shows after being sold off by its parent company in 1991, and eventually shut down in 2009. The BBC recently covered the history of Cosgrove Hall in a short article and a much longer 30-minute radio tribute by David Jason, voice of Danger Mouse himself (as well as Count Duckula, Hugo, and many other characters). [more inside]
posted by narain on Oct 13, 2013 - 55 comments

Catch the action, guess the mystery on my show. The best show: Mr. T.

"Listen up. This is Mr. T. I pity the fool who misses my show. I pity him!" These words began about half of the episodes of Mr. T, the animated series. It was part Scooby Doo, part A-Team, and part American Anthem. But whatever it was, it was thoroughly 1980s, and its entire 30 episode run can be found below the fold. Each show featured a live action lead-in to that week's mystery, in which Mr. T. and his globetrotting, crimesolving band of child gymnasts brought down another bad guy. Following each show was another live action segment imparting a moral lesson. So, it looks like you have a few seasons to catch up, doesn't it? [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Oct 12, 2013 - 98 comments

Humming Ashokan Farewell While Viewing Is Optional

The Civil War Trust's animated maps provides viewers with a bird's eye view of American Civil War battles.
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Oct 9, 2013 - 10 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 30
Posts