Join 3,424 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

2 posts tagged with archaeology by ewagoner.
Displaying 1 through 2 of 2.

Related tags:
+ (90)
+ (22)
+ (19)
+ (14)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)


Users that often use this tag:
homunculus (43)
lagado (16)
stbalbach (14)
Rumple (12)
Kattullus (11)
Abiezer (7)
amyms (4)
zarq (4)
y2karl (3)
plep (3)
Miko (3)
paduasoy (3)
filthy light thief (3)
BadMiker (2)
Athanassiel (2)
MartinWisse (2)
jetlagaddict (2)
novenator (2)
Horace Rumpole (2)
grapefruitmoon (2)
blahblahblah (2)
felix betachat (2)
carter (2)
bittennails (2)
mcgraw (2)
ewagoner (2)
luser (2)
Irontom (2)
dfowler (2)

The Mayan common class migrated to the southeast United States?

Massive 1,100+ year old Maya site discovered in Georgia's mountains The archaeological site would have been particularly attractive to Mayas because it contains an apparently dormant volcano fumarole that reaches down into the bowels of the earth. People of One Fire researchers have been aware since 2010 that when the English arrived in the Southeast, there were numerous Native American towns named Itsate in Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina and western North Carolina. They were also aware that both the Itza Mayas of Central America and the Hitchiti Creeks of the Southeast actually called themselves Itsate . . . and pronounced the word the same way. The Itsate Creeks used many Maya and Totonac words. Their architecture was identical to that of Maya commoners. The pottery at Ocmulgee National Monument (c 900 AD) in central Georgia is virtually identical to the Maya Plain Red pottery made by Maya Commoners.
posted by ewagoner on Dec 22, 2011 - 111 comments

Passport in Time

Passport in Time is a volunteer program of the USDA Forest Service where you can be a real-life archaeologist for a week or just a weekend. There are projects located around the country, around the calendar. With no previous experience, you can help professional archaeologists survey and excavate sites ranging in age from the early 1900s back to the paleolithic. Myself, I helped excavate Pueblo de la Mesa, a pre-Columbian Anasazi site atop a lonely mesa in New Mexico.
posted by ewagoner on Aug 13, 2003 - 12 comments

Page: 1