261 posts tagged with archive.
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Tarzan's Tripes Forever

The Web's First Shaggy Dog Story Archive Fuckwit says: skip lengthy intro and go direct to archives at margin and click away for mucho chortles on this grand holiday weekend.
posted by Postroad on Nov 24, 2005 - 10 comments

Design Journal Online

Design Online - a team from the London College of Communication have scanned and indexed all the issues of Design from 1965 - 1974 (via the Design Weblog, which says: "I believe you really need to see and understand the past in order to blaze a new trail").
posted by tpl1212 on Nov 17, 2005 - 13 comments

Archive of American Television interviews online

Hundreds of hours of unedited interview footage with television pioneers. From the Archive of American Television, previously available via appointment, now available via Google Video. Okay, so maybe Michael J. Fox [video link] is no pioneer, but Norman Lear [video link] is. Also Mister Rogers [video link].)
posted by nobody on Oct 28, 2005 - 2 comments

amazing stories cover archive

Amazing Stories... every cover of this seminal sci-fi pulp magazine, from 1926 to 1967, plus.
posted by crunchland on Oct 23, 2005 - 7 comments

self-confessed valley girl

International Dialects of English Archive
posted by kenko on Sep 6, 2005 - 17 comments

The Union Makes Us Strong

The Union Makes Us Strong. Articles on British trade union history.
posted by plep on Aug 5, 2005 - 3 comments

Das Kapital (of economic texts)

Archive for the History of Economic Thought
posted by Gyan on Jul 20, 2005 - 7 comments

"A Miscellany of Diverse Interest and Pleasure"

Odd Books dedicated to that constant source of delight and wonder, the second-hand bookshop. (via)
posted by crunchland on Jul 15, 2005 - 11 comments

Open Government (Research)

OpenCRS - easy access to US Congressional Research Service Reports
posted by daksya on Jun 28, 2005 - 4 comments

Lenin would be proud. Over.

Commies with headphones.
posted by crunchland on Jun 27, 2005 - 18 comments

Scotsman Newspaper Digital Archive 1817-1950

Edinburgh's Scotsman newspaper has launched a digital archive covering all editions from 1817-1950. There are several stories with an American slant which may be something that interests you. There is coverage on such things as the hanging of the notorious bodysnatchers Burke and Hare. Unfortunately, after viewing the free archives it is a paysite, but I still think it's worth a look as there is easily a couple of hours of interesting reading on the free articles that are included. The set-up and look of this site is brilliant as well.
posted by ClanvidHorse on Jun 4, 2005 - 9 comments

The dear green place?

Best laid schemes? Back in 1945 the Bruce Plan [click on images for video footage] was a radical proposal to knock down, and then rebuild, the Victorian centre of the city of Glasgow. The city’s slums* would be cleared; new towns* would be established; Glasgow would rise again, triumphant, once again the second city of the Empire*. In 1971*, there were grand visions of the Glasgow of the future; the Glasgow of tomorrow would be a bright, shining new city, and the Clyde* would once again be something to be proud of. A fascinating film archive of the Glasgow of the 20th century. *All links contain embedded video goodness.
posted by Len on May 17, 2005 - 13 comments

Broadsword calling Danny Boy

Channel 4's 100 Greatest War Films as voted for by their (generally more clued-up than average) viewership has plenty for you to disagree with, but much to recommend. Filmsite.org has a history of war films (as does Berkeley) for the completists among you. There are more war films from and about Vietnam and Indochina than you can shake a bayonet at (see also the 1999 NYT article, Apocalypse Then: Vietnam Marketing War Films to learn a little about the Vietnamese government's 1960s and 70s archive of war film). The [British] national archives have archived film from pre-WWI to the Cold War.
posted by nthdegx on May 17, 2005 - 74 comments

An enduring and beautiful People

Faces young and old, mothers and children, dolls; hunting rabbit, making fire, dancing: Archived photographs of Arizona's Indians from the turn-of-the-twentieth. Plus reference materials.
posted by breezeway on Apr 7, 2005 - 8 comments

bikini girls with machine g-g-g-guns

Girls With Guns In Cinema And Television is acollection of images of women in film and on television holding firearms, sorted by film/show title, weapon, IMDB ranking (needs some updating...Sticks got a 9.9?), and more. Scroll down past the lengthy news updates to get to the actual archives. (The site itself SFW but some of the images linked aren't. Beware!)
posted by mcsweetie on Mar 22, 2005 - 12 comments

finally, affordable housing!

Build a huge house for only $782?! Low-cost housing for the masses! Unfortunately, you have to travel back in time to build houses for less than $1000. How many of these homes are in your town or on your block? (courtesy of J-Walk)
posted by crunchland on Mar 16, 2005 - 22 comments

"It has ever been my study and ever shall be, to render you as happy as possible. But I have been obliged in many instances to sacrifice the present pleasures to our future hopes."

"It has ever been my study and ever shall be, to render you as happy as possible. But I have been obliged in many instances to sacrifice the present pleasures to our future hopes." From a Camp Croton bivouac of 1778 to a bunker in Afghanistan, a collection of wartime love letters in their original hands, movingly read aloud. Chapter 3 in The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History's online exhibit Battle Lines: Letters from America's Wars. [Flash, but quite worth it]
posted by Tufa on Feb 14, 2005 - 6 comments

The DNA of Literature

The DNA of Literature. The Paris Review, with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, makes available free .pdfs of fifty years of interviews with leading writers.
posted by rushmc on Jan 12, 2005 - 7 comments

An online history of jurisprudence, and lack thereof

Sacco and Vanzetti et al. The amazing Famous Trials website, compiled as a labor of love by University of Missouri law professor Douglas Linder, is a motherlode of information on historically significant trails, ranging from Galileo to the Amistad to Lenny Bruce. It features not only official transcripts, but also equally intriguing details such as a map of the railroad cars in the Scottsboro Boys trial, Klan documents from the Mississippi Burning case, and opinion polls related to the My Lai courts martial.
posted by foxy_hedgehog on Nov 30, 2004 - 8 comments

Caffeine, Nicotine, and Benzedrine (and wish me luck)

Head Back to Mono in 32k at the rineke.net records archive, where a rather consistent curator has digitized a goody chunk of his record collection. It's posted in more-or-less every iteration imaginable. Observe the linked scans (1 mb page, careful!) of the covers (also in multiple resolutions up to full-size). Note the records themselves, in sleeve or out, depending. Most especially, savor the clean, low-res mono mp3s that cry out to be played through the dashboard speakers of a 1967 Dodge Dart.

Bonus Big Beat Bonanza: The site's author is also behind the similarly detailed archive of shows by ex-WFMU dj The Hound, from 1987 through 1995, heavy on the rare regional sides beloved of certain of my pals down New Orleans way.

Last, but not least, rineke.net hosts the adventures of a platoon of Tux clones, sealing my geek admiration for the overseer of the site. There's more, of course. My propeller beanie's off to you, sir, and long may you wave, or particle, as is your choice and preference.

(Permission was sought and granted to post this, as I feard for the site's bandwidth. Have at it, Mefites!
posted by mwhybark on Aug 12, 2004 - 7 comments

The art of caricature

The Lewis Walpole Library has digitized 10,000 images from its superb collection of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century satirical prints -- not the only collection of its kind on the Internet, but certainly one of the largest and best. Search under "Gillray", "Rowlandson" or "Cruikshank" and browse a selection of images from the golden age of English caricature. Everyone will have their own favourites, but here are a few of mine: Rowlandson's Author and Bookseller, Cruikshank's The Headache and Gillray's Advantages of Wearing Muslin Dresses.
posted by verstegan on Jul 31, 2004 - 4 comments

Illustrator for Windows

The Corpus Vitrearum Medii Aevi now has a digital archive containing 10,000 images of medieval stained glass from English churches and cathedrals: a wonderful resource for anyone interested in medieval art. These stunning images of the windows at Fairford, in Gloucestershire, are just a tiny fraction of the extraordinary riches available on the site.
posted by verstegan on Jul 24, 2004 - 14 comments

FCC vs. The fifth amendment

FCC wants radio, TV to keep tapes of shows. Presumably this is to make it easier for the FCC's Enforcement Bureau to levy some of those hefty new fines. Now I know the issue of the FCC fines and the FCC in general has already been discussed here, here, here, and possibly here. But it seems like there's a fifth amendment issue here that's new to this debate. Will forcing broadcasters to keep tapes in effect compel them to give evidence against themselves?
posted by Grimgrin on Jul 8, 2004 - 19 comments

Voices from Naropa

The Internet Archive just got beat. William Burroughs on wishing. Mystical audio by Harry Smith. Amiri Baraka (formerly LeRoi Jones) on "jism and jazz". Ginsberg reads "Howl." The most historically significant archive of Beat and post-Beat recordings is now free for the downloading. Lossless or lo-fi, saved or streamed -- the tape vault of Naropa Institute is unlocked on archive.org as the Creative Commons grows.
posted by digaman on Jun 22, 2004 - 25 comments

Home of the Underdogs

"Home of the Underdogs is a non-profit site dedicated to the preservation and promotion of underrated PC games (and a few non-PC games) of all ages: good games that deserve a second chance after dismal sales or critical reviews that we feel are unwarranted."
posted by Hildago on Apr 4, 2004 - 27 comments

Children's literature 1850 and up

Online collection of children's literature circa 1850 and up. Primarily American and British, from thrilling stories of the ocean to a peep at the beasts. Every page (and even the spine) digitized in both JPEG and PDF format, and in some cases color-corrected. (Similar collections have been posted here previously)
posted by schoolgirl report on Apr 4, 2004 - 10 comments

April Fools

Top 100 April Fools Hoaxes of all time. Also, April Fools on the Net - a history of newsgroup April Fools posts.
posted by badstone on Apr 1, 2004 - 3 comments

Library and Archival Exhibitions on the Web

Library and Archival Exhibitions on the Web. Many links to interesting sites - African liberation movement posters, Charles Babbage, Braniff Airways history, daily life in Sierra Leone 1936-37, the photography of Eamon Melaugh, Frank & Marshall College from the air, all the way through to ZYX: a selection of ABC books. Via thinking while typing.
posted by plep on Mar 10, 2004 - 2 comments

Girl Watching

The Girl Watcher Whether your scene is the kitten type, stalking the girl, or just straight-up girl collecting - this is the publication for you. Bail not included. (via filepile)
posted by owillis on Mar 6, 2004 - 22 comments

Hama-Net

Hama-Net: Plentiful Electronic Photo Library on Odagahama Japan, and Neighbouring Seashores.
posted by hama7 on Jan 29, 2004 - 0 comments

Lucky Amulet Archive

The Lucky W Amulet Archive : "A folkloric resource that contains hundreds of interlinked pages describing and illustrating amulets, talismans, lucky charms, and good luck pieces from around the world and all eras".
posted by taz on Jan 28, 2004 - 10 comments

Breakfast Without Soing Into The Kitchen!

A Short, Illustrated History Of The First Toasters
Suitable for those with short attention sp--- Huh?
posted by armoured-ant on Jan 20, 2004 - 9 comments

Voices from the Days of Slavery.

Voices from the Days of Slavery. A collection of audio recordings made between 1932 and 1975 of African Americans known to have once been slaves. Hear Isom Moseley describe how he used to make soap, and express his opinion of the "white folks" who owned and ran the plantation where he was held. Wallace Quarterman describes his experience as a freed man in Georgia, and recounts the violent atmosphere of the Reconstruction South. Aunt Phoebe Boyd describes the demands of agricultural work. Even more narratives are available as transcripts from the companion exhibit, Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938 (linked to previously on Metafilter here), though some of these were unfortunately edited selectively.
posted by profwhat on Jan 19, 2004 - 15 comments

We hope, very shortly, to release a mouse in the elephant's cage.

If you're a fan of the works of J. Michael Straczynski (especially Babylon 5, and let me take this moment to give massive props to The Lurker's Guide to Babylon 5, the second website I ever visited (after searching Yahoo! for "Babylon 5")), then you probably already know that he has long been an advocate of online communication as a means of both promotion of his work and communication with the fans of said work. JMSnews.com has an archive of all his postings going back eleven and a half years, a neat accomplishment by ephemeral Internet standards, and it's fascinating reading that gives you a nice portrait of a guy with a story to tell, and his journey to get it told. If you're a geek for "the business" that is Hollywood, this is for you.
posted by WolfDaddy on Jan 19, 2004 - 12 comments

A treasure trove of math history

The MacTutor History of Mathematics archive from the University of St. Andrews' School of Mathematics and Statistics.
posted by wobh on Dec 30, 2003 - 3 comments

The Rotten Library.

Most people have heard of Rotten.com, the website of sick and twisted news and pictures, but a great and full featured documentary of "all that mankind swore to forget" can be found at the Rotten Library. Information on just about everything is here, from LSD Blotters to the Mountain Meadows Massacre to the anti-masturbatory history of Kelloggs Corn Flakes, just to name a few. Of course, you can also find dirty secrets about the Freemasons, Fluoridation, Iraq Weapons of Mass Destruction, The Kinderhook Plates, Lucky Luciano, Kevin Mitnick, and of course..... Michael Jackson.
posted by Keyser Soze on Dec 20, 2003 - 17 comments

BFI presents screenonline

BFI presents screenonline | The British Film Institute announces the launch of screenonline: "This new site features an unrivalled collection of archive film and television footage from the bfi National Film and Television Archive.... [It] is the first time the bfi has given the public access online to its comprehensive collection of film and television material, giving teachers, students and film enthusiasts an exceptional opportunity to investigate British history, culture and society through cinema. "
posted by jacknose on Dec 1, 2003 - 6 comments

Greed is God

delenda mp3.com est "Vivendi Universal recently sold the MP3.com domain to CNet. However, they're not selling the approximately one million songs on the archive. (recorded by over 250,000 artists) Instead, they're simply destroying it as of December 3. MP3.com's founder and former CEO, Michael Robertson, is pleading with Vivendi to allow the Internet Archive to preserve the songs." (via Slashdot)
posted by kablam on Nov 23, 2003 - 16 comments

RMN: Remember, within a year people are not going to be thinking of this.

The President Calling: American Radioworks (MPR) explores the secret phone tapes of Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon. AFAIK, the content is all previously available, but online, they've packaged and annotated it for ease of use. It's not exhaustive, but the moments picked out are often illuminating, showing "how each man used one-on-one politics to shape history." You might want to start here.
posted by soyjoy on Nov 20, 2003 - 5 comments

penny arcade

Before there were videogames... an archive of old penny arcade machines.
posted by crunchland on Sep 28, 2003 - 7 comments

Men who know say NO!

American Social Hygiene Posters from the University of Minnesota. Remember boys, You may think she's just your gal, but she may be everyone's pal.
posted by JoanArkham on Sep 10, 2003 - 32 comments

This is the BBC.

Dyke to open up BBC archive. Greg Dyke, director general of the BBC, has announced plans to give the public full access to all the corporation's programme archives. Wow! The BBC has archives stretching back to when the Earth was still cooling. And now it will all be available online and for free. [Via Slashdot]
posted by PenDevil on Aug 24, 2003 - 36 comments

Ahhh ... memory lane

Obsolete computers 1975-89. There's my first baby.
posted by MintSauce on Aug 22, 2003 - 51 comments

xray gallery

online archive of x-ray images
posted by crunchland on Jul 23, 2003 - 8 comments

And the best part is...no VJs!

The Scopitone was a French video jukebox that made its debut in 1960 and was imported into the US in 1964. Although they usually featured high production values, catchy melodies, and lots of gratuitous cheesecake, the singers were often relative unknowns and the music was square even by the standards of the day. Consequently, they never caught on in a big way outside of Europe, and many of the original Scopitone jukeboxes and films were destroyed. Fortunately for us, a few Scopitone enthusiasts have catalogued the songs, scanned the advertisements, and even preserved a few Quicktime clips of the original French and American Scopitone films.
posted by MrBaliHai on May 4, 2003 - 9 comments

Beginnings

Beginnings at the Library of Congress. The origins of the Universe, humanity and society as viewed by different cultural and religious traditions; and their attempts to explain it all.
The Talk.Origins Archive presents a more scientific view of physical and biological beginnings.
posted by plep on May 3, 2003 - 6 comments

Porcupine porcupine porcupine racetrack Porcupine porcupine porcupine racetrack

Now I know what you're thinking, Barry and Levon, where did you get a quicktime archive of every The State skit? Shhhh.....don't worry your pretty head about it, it ain't your concern. Now if you excuse me I got to whisper sweet nothings to two-hundred and forty dollars worth of pudding.
posted by Stan Chin on Dec 17, 2002 - 43 comments

Digital Clendening

Digital Clendening The University of Kansas Medical Center has an interesting archive of images and text relating to the medical profession. I'm not sure how I happened on this (I was just cleaning out my bookmarks - some google search found this but I don't recall what I was searching for).
posted by substrate on Oct 10, 2002 - 6 comments

Social engineering!

Social engineering! Gender labelling! Corporate self-aggrandizement! It's all here in a nice variety of formats on the Internet Moving Images Archive. 'Educational' films spanning several decades in all of their cheezy glory. Now, if only I could find 'Donald Duck in Mathmagic Land.'
posted by umberto on Apr 20, 2002 - 5 comments

Online Audio Recordings: UC Berkeley Lectures and Events

Online Audio Recordings: UC Berkeley Lectures and Events Including speeches by James Baldwin, Walter Blum, Malcolm X, and Noam Chomsky, to name a few.
posted by RobertLoch on Apr 13, 2002 - 13 comments

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