Join 3,553 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

27 posts tagged with arstechnica. (View popular tags)
Displaying 1 through 27 of 27. Subscribe:

Users that often use this tag:
the man of twists ... (7)

Mining and mapping comments to the FCC on Net Neutrality

Despite the comment collecting engine crashing on the last day to submit comments on the very popular topic of Network Neutrality, the system worked well enough to collect 1.1 million comments, which the FCC has made available to the general public as six XML files, totaling over 1.4 gigs of raw data. Mailed comments postmarked prior to July 18 are still being scanned and entered, so this isn't everything, but it's a lot of data. TechCrunch graphed the frequency of certain words, with the high score going to Comcast, with 4,613 mentions. NPR shared the visualized results of Quid's analysis of a sample of 250,000 comments, and Quid's analysis of a sample of 317,000 comments to map geographic sources of the public comments and adjusted them based on state populations to depict which states care more about net neutrality, while The Verge dug deeper, mapping comments by zip code.
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 13, 2014 - 12 comments

Unbundle it

The US doesn't need network neutrality, it needs competition
posted by indubitable on Jun 27, 2014 - 25 comments

There are Plenty of Skeptics

The US Secret Service, the federal law enforcement agency tasked with protecting the safety of current and former national leaders and their families, visiting heads of state, and others, posted a work order on Monday seeking the development of social media analytics software capable of detecting sarcasm online.
posted by chavenet on Jun 7, 2014 - 74 comments

Free from Choice

The psychology of Soylent and the prison of first-world food choices
People are born with neither the ability to cook nor compile; both are taught, and chastising even an adult for not knowing how to cook a healthy meal makes about as much sense as chastising an adult for not knowing how to code or how to compile an application from source. Each of those two different ridicules demonstrates an identical lack of empathy and an accompanying equally stunning sense of privilege that you should probably check immediately.

posted by the man of twists and turns on May 29, 2014 - 395 comments

The Corrrect Answer is "All of Season One"

Ars Technica Picks Their Least Favourite ST:TNG Episodes
posted by modernnomad on Mar 25, 2014 - 189 comments

Hello Influencers!

Got 30 seconds of XBox One game footage and absolutely nothing negative to say about it? A tweet from Ron Smith, community director for Machinima UK, announced that if you posted videos for Machinima, you could be making $3 CPM ($3 per thousand video views) on those videos. Only one catch: the agreement specifically forbids you from saying "anything negative or disparaging about Machinima, Xbox One, or any of its Games"... in fact, you can't disclose the existence of the agreement. OK, maybe two catches: this may violate FTC rules on endorsements in advertising [PDF]. Smith's tweet was quickly taken down (and the Twitter handle taken by some vituperative anti-Machinima person), but the news spread to NeoGAF before being confirmed by ArsTechinica and by Kotaku. Want to know who nibbled at the bait? Check the Poptent activity panel for Nick Sheets, who according to LinkedIn is the "Manager, Affiliate Activations (Branded Entertainment)" for Machinima's L.A. office.
posted by The Pluto Gangsta on Jan 20, 2014 - 18 comments

Siracusa pens longform review of OS X 10.9 Mavericks

Along with today's release of OS X 10.9 Mavericks (a free download from the Mac App Store) comes John Siracusa's remarkably detailed 24,008 word review of the new OS for Ars Technica.
[more inside]
posted by porn in the woods on Oct 22, 2013 - 190 comments

Five years and $600 million

How Zynga went from social gaming powerhouse to has-been
posted by figurant on Sep 12, 2013 - 76 comments

The World Has No Room for Cowards

It’s not often that one has the opportunity to be the target of a cyber and kinetic attack at the same time. But that is exactly what’s happened to me and my Web site over the past 24 hours. On Thursday afternoon, my site was the target of a fairly massive denial of service attack. That attack was punctuated by a visit from a heavily armed local police unit that was tricked into responding to a 911 call spoofed to look like it came from my home. Well, as one gamer enthusiast who follows me on Twitter remarked, I guess I’ve now “unlocked that level.” ~ KrebsonSecurity
posted by infini on Mar 16, 2013 - 56 comments

"The project began with a mechanical hand"

Robohand: How cheap 3D printers built a replacement hand for a five-year old boy [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 3, 2013 - 19 comments

Google Ring?

If special hardware can crack all your passwords, if people have a hard time remembering them anyway, if people don't implement them in the first place, it is no wonder Google (with Yubico) is "declar[ing] war on the password." [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 19, 2013 - 76 comments

The Hunt For "Red October"

An advanced and well-orchestrated computer spy operation that targeted diplomats, governments and research institutions for at least five years has been uncovered by security researchers in Russia.
The highly targeted campaign, which focuses primarily on victims in Eastern Europe and Central Asia based on existing data, is still live, harvesting documents and data from computers, smartphones and removable storage devices, such as USB sticks, according to Kaspersky Lab, the Moscow-based antivirus firm that uncovered the campaign. Kaspersky has dubbed the operation “Red October.”
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 15, 2013 - 26 comments

"Your app's anti-piracy module, it's not working"

An iOS application developer has come up with an extreme way of fighting software piracy—by auto-posting "confessions" to its users' Twitter accounts. "...Enfour, the maker of a variety of dictionary apps, is auto-posting tweets to users' accounts to shame them for being pirates. But the auto-tweeting seems to be affecting a huge portion of its paid user base, not just those who actually stole the apps." Follow-up. A personal account: Can’t spell “pirate” without “-irate”: on DRM and punishing the customer [more inside]
posted by flex on Nov 29, 2012 - 74 comments

Thanks for two hours of your time

"I am calling you from Windows": A tech support scammer dials Ars Technica [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 26, 2012 - 98 comments

Monetarists Anonymous

Three Years In, Bitcoin Gains Momentum [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 14, 2012 - 64 comments

Three Ts and Gold

Last month, the Securities and Exchange Commission changed their rules to require companies to disclose if they use 'tantalum, tin, gold, or tungsten if those minerals are “necessary to the functionality or production of a product”' These are also known as 'conflict minerals.' The Deadly Tin Inside Your Smartphone, Businessweek [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 27, 2012 - 17 comments

Your Passwords Are Much Weaker Than You Think

Why passwords have never been weaker—and crackers have never been stronger. Ars weighs in on the amazing advances the bad guys have made in password cracking over the last few years. Think you know how to choose something that's safe? The probability is quite high that you don't, even if you're technically ept. [more inside]
posted by Malor on Aug 21, 2012 - 184 comments

I hesitated / before untying the bow

In 1992, renowned sci-fi author and futurist William Gibson (Neuromancer, Virtual Light) released Agrippa (A Book of the Dead), a self-playing poem contained on a floppy disk for old Macintosh computers that, once its text had scrolled up the screen one time, would be rendered unreadable on purpose. Now, 20 years later, a PhD student at the University of Toronto is enlisting the aid of cryptographers in hopes of figuring out how the program works. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Jul 12, 2012 - 24 comments

The Phi does for radio what Apple did for computing

The Phi is a PCIe card which turns your computer into a software-defined radio which "could record FM radio and digital television signals, read RFID chips, track ship locations, or do radio astronomy. In principle it could perform all of these functions simultaneously." While the Phi isn't the first such device available for purchase, it is the first to target hobbyists and eventually consumers, but how will the FCC handle software-defined radio?
posted by reductiondesign on Jul 8, 2012 - 49 comments

September 1st, 1859: The Week the Sun Touched the Earth

Boston telegraph operator, (to Portland telegraph operator): "Please cut off your battery entirely from the line for fifteen minutes."
Portland operator: "Will do so. It is now disconnected."
Boston: "Mine is disconnected, and we are working with the auroral current. How do you receive my writing?"
Portland: "Better than with our batteries on. Current comes and goes gradually."
Boston: "My current is very strong at times, and we can work better without the batteries, as the Aurora seems to neutralize and augment our batteries alternately, making current too strong at times for our relay magnets. Suppose we work without batteries while we are affected by this trouble."
Portland: "Very well. Shall I go ahead with business?"
Boston: "Yes. Go ahead." — Ars Technica covers the story of the Great Auroral Storm of 1859, and the awe it inspired.
posted by Toekneesan on May 3, 2012 - 23 comments

I would play the hell out of this game

"it's a hard sell to executives to suggest an FPS with no shooting, but this is definitely the sort of game we should be making, as an industry." Warco: an FPS where you hold a camera instead of a gun. Ars Technica has a writeup.
posted by rebent on Sep 21, 2011 - 41 comments

The Oatmeal vs. FunnyJunk

Soon after Inman's blog post went up, the FunnyJunk administrator sent a message to his users in which he said that “the Oatmeal wants to sue funnyjunk and shut it down! He thinks we're nothing more than dirty content thieves." The message linked to Inman's contact page and The Oatmeal Facebook account. The Facebook page was soon "completely trolled," said Inman, and he was not impressed by the quality of the commenters. “Their favorite noun was ‘fag’,” he said.

The Oatmeal vs. FunnyJunk: a webcomic copyright fight gets personal. (FunnyJunk site may contain NSFW thumbnails.)
posted by Horace Rumpole on Jun 2, 2011 - 94 comments

I think the primary reason was Steve Jobs' hatred of screws

Kyle Wiens of iFixit talks to ArsTechnica about iFixit's history ("my iBook G3...It seemed crazy that I couldn't find any information online on how to get the thing back together"), his goals ("we realized that the world needed free, open source service manuals, and the manufacturers weren't stepping up"), planned obsolescence, the dirty tricks manufacturers pull to make it harder to repair your own stuff ("Torx has a patent...They're using lawyers to prevent people from making their computers last longer than 3-400 battery cycles"), who are the design kings of repair and servicing, who the villains are, and why recycling electronics isn't all you'd probably like it to be.
posted by rodgerd on Sep 11, 2010 - 43 comments

"Why Ad Blocking Hurts the Sites You Love"

Ars Technica recently experimented with blocking the content of their site from users who use ad blockers. They have now written an editorial about the experiment, and the effects of ad blockers on their site. [more inside]
posted by mccarty.tim on Mar 7, 2010 - 517 comments

I know what's wrong and that's good.

"...criticism, for lack of a better word, is good. Criticism is right. Criticism works. Criticism clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit…
posted by Brandon Blatcher on May 6, 2009 - 52 comments

Ars Technica chews Mac OS X up and spits it out.

Ars Technica chews Mac OS X up and spits it out. The verdict? Shows a lot of promise, but needs work.
posted by darukaru on Apr 2, 2001 - 19 comments

Smellovision

Smellovision ("Digiscents") demoed at Comdex. Scan down to the fourth paragraph for an informal review.
posted by Steven Den Beste on Nov 16, 2000 - 15 comments

Page: 1