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The Judgment of Paris (and a neck that can bend 140 degrees)

Mallory Ortberg of The Toast continues the fine tradition of providing not-so-serious narration to very-serious art. This time, she tackles the Judgment of Paris, a theme "based on a legend where three supremely powerful goddesses asked a worthless male mortal to rank them in order of attractiveness in order to win a sculpture of a fruit." [more inside]
posted by Ouverture on Jul 22, 2014 - 55 comments

A Dutch seascape and its lost Leviathan

"Earlier this year a conservator at the Hamilton Kerr Institute made a surprising discovery while working on a 17th-century painting owned by the Fitzwilliam Museum. As Shan Kuang cleaned the surface, she revealed the beached whale that had been the intended focus of the composition."
posted by brundlefly on Jun 5, 2014 - 37 comments

Paintings and Google Street View mashups

London to Amsterdam, Saint Petersburg and Tokyo to New York, well known historical paintings of city scenes around the world superimposed on to Google Street View by Halley Docherty (whose username is shystone on Reddit) | Google Street View Paintings by Raul Moyado Sandoval that he calls Metapanoramas | Also Paintings as Google Street View Maps via Lileks' wonderful Lint. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Mar 31, 2014 - 4 comments

The Art of Arman: lyrical abstract painter and sculpter of the readymade

Arman, a French-born American artist (given the name Armand Fernandez at birth, later taking the American civil name Armand Pierre Arman) was a notable as both a painter and a sculpter. In his paintings, he moved objects through ink or paint to make the works, while his sculptures consist of "accumulations" and/or destruction/recomposition of objects. On the larger scale, he constructed the Hope for Peace monument (WikiMapia) and Long Term Parking. You can read about Arman on his official site, ArtNet, and The Art Story.
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 22, 2013 - 3 comments

Free art books online from the Metropolitan and Guggenheim Museums

The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim offer 474 free art books online. 99 art catalogs from the Guggenheim. 375 MetPublications. An example: Masterpieces of Painting in the Metropolitan Museum of Art [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Oct 27, 2013 - 11 comments

Rijksmuseum remix

The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, home to Rembrandt's The Night Watch and Vermeer's The Milkmaid, among many other masterpieces, today unveiled the Rijksstudio, 125,000 digitized images of its collections, available in a zoomable interface online or as high-resolution public-domain downloads (account creation required for the latter).
posted by Horace Rumpole on Oct 31, 2012 - 31 comments

Old ships and nautical memorabilia

Old Ships is a website packed full of evocative, interesting and historical pictures of old ships from A to Zambesi. It's a feast of all kinds of other vintage maritime images, including ports, docks, ferries, harbors, paintings, canals, rivers, maritime scenes, onboard pictures, shipboard menus, lots of great postcards and other old historical nautical memorabilia (even the ship's cat). [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Aug 24, 2012 - 13 comments

arts & crafts blogging, subset: geek

Geek Art Gallery features many different kinds of geek-related art in round-ups and posts: art installations, animation, comics, film shorts, paintings, photography, sculpture - even desserts. Specifically craft-focused geek blogs: Geek Crafts and Sprite Stitch (previously)
posted by flex on Aug 12, 2012 - 1 comment

The Hippy and the Expressionists

Confessions of a Genius Art Forger — In one of Germany's greatest art scandals, former hippie and talented artist Wolfgang Beltracchi forged dozens of paintings over a period of 35 years, earning millions and fooling top collectors and museums. In a SPIEGEL interview, he reveals how he did it and why he eventually got caught. Photo Gallery. Background... [more inside]
posted by netbros on May 26, 2012 - 20 comments

"Characters with Unusual Pets and their Unusual Circumstances"

"The Secret Pet Society" is an fantastical series of paintings with descriptions by artist Travis Louie which features Victorian-era styled people posing alongside their mythical creatures. [more inside]
posted by quin on Apr 24, 2012 - 11 comments

The Space of Imagination

Dr. Dan Durda [bio; vita] is a veritable Renaissance Man, having hobbies that others would call careers; most notably, he is an accomplished astronomer, jet pilot, cave diver, and Fellow of the International Association of Astronomical Artists.

Oh yeah, about that art stuff -- there's a lot [more inside]
posted by troll on Oct 1, 2011 - 5 comments

Sleepdrunk Vademecum

Tania Blanco is a modern artist who shares her time in France and Spain. She says of her collection Sleepdrunk Vademecum, "The body is made up of a large set of rounded painting formats. Medical instruments, high precision technology, scientific devices, anatomical models, clandestine laboratories and human representation become the object of study and thought. The bizarre represented objects reflect a mixture of past and future, and an ambiguous clinical atmosphere flows in them. On many of these painted surfaces, a soft cool-cold gradient isolates the represented elements and gives a non-gravitational character to the compositions." [via]
posted by netbros on Sep 11, 2011 - 3 comments

Old Cats in Hats

The best animated gif about hats you'll see this year.* by Micaël Reynaud, who has other cool morphing things on his Google+ page, as well as videos, photos, drawings and stuff. If your animated gif tastes go more to abstract/geometric/optical-illusion/seizure-triggering (that's a warning), check out david ope on tumblr (where you expect to find the gifs).

* may load slowly; be patient to get maximum 'wow'

posted by oneswellfoop on Sep 10, 2011 - 21 comments

Wet Hot American Gothic

In commemoration of the 10th Anniversary of the release of Wet Hot American Summer, Gallery 1988 in Los Angeles is presenting an exhibition of artwork inspired by the movie. Gallery (2) [more inside]
posted by schmod on Jun 15, 2011 - 68 comments

"It [abstract art] should be enjoyed just as music is enjoyed – after a while you may like it or you may not." Jackson Pollock

“My monkey could have painted that.” 1 in 3 Art Students Can’t Tell Famous Paintings from Paintings by Monkeys. Take a look at the two images in this post. Can you tell? [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Mar 5, 2011 - 308 comments

Nothing is Forgotten

Nothing is Forgotten, a lovely little wordless comic about loss, fear, kindness, and memory.
posted by Gator on Jan 4, 2011 - 39 comments

Staggering cache of Picassos turns up in France

Staggering Cache Of Picassos Turns Up In France. A retired French electrician and his wife say they stashed hundreds of never-before-seen works [in French at Libération, who broke the story] estimated to be worth at least $80 million in their garage. The works are believed to be authentic, but it's not quite clear how they came to be in the couple's possession.
posted by nickyskye on Nov 29, 2010 - 66 comments

These Are Paintings

"These paintings became a way to explore how driving in weather shifts and changes the views outside the car as well how the driving experience informs our basic interpretation of environment." The work of artist Gregory Thielker.
posted by fantodstic on Oct 16, 2010 - 8 comments

Art Inconnu

Art Inconnu [unknown art] (nsfw): Collected here are works by artists who are forgotten, under appreciated, or little known to the mainstream. The focus here is primarily painting by 19th and 20th century artists but everything is fair game. Different sets of images: Reading l Some Women Painters l Chess l The World in Miniature l Weather l Motherhood l Mixed Bag. Art Inconnu's Flickr set.
posted by nickyskye on Oct 3, 2010 - 10 comments

The Bradshaws

The elegant and sophisticated paintings found in the north west Australia, are claimed to be the oldest figurative paintings in the world, known as the Bradshaws, or Gwion Gwion. The Bradshaw Foundation website has an awesome online collection of rock and cave art paintings with extensive information. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Sep 11, 2010 - 6 comments

Unesayvtli, Usdi. Yust dohi yust gusdi?

Swedish-Cherokee artist America Meredith shows you how to be a Cherokee beatnik (or just talk like one). [more inside]
posted by JoanArkham on Jul 8, 2010 - 5 comments

Outside In

JJ Cromer is a self-taught painter, whose dense, liney work reminds me of Howard Finster and Basil Wolverton.
posted by klangklangston on Jun 18, 2010 - 12 comments

ULTRA MONSTERS ATTACK!

Ultra Monster art by Takayoshi Mizuki: Japanese monster-kaiju art from the 70s. Warnring: Contains Dino-Tank
posted by The Whelk on Apr 16, 2010 - 31 comments

Stylized Doll-like Artist Jennifer Springman

Jennifer Springman has been doing oil paintings of women with almost doll like features. Just wanted to share my favorite piece as well.
posted by b2walton on Apr 11, 2010 - 26 comments

Jesus is everywhere.

While looking at La Luz De Jesus gallery art I found this painting of Jesus in a kitchen sink and an easter bunny suicide which reminded me of the Easter Bunny beat down in Mallrats. And then George Carlin busting out Buddy Christ in Dogma.Which got me looking at the trailer for the Jesus face movie. Then wondering where else Jesus Face has shown up. And now I'm learning about the Shroud of Turin and then immediately unlearning it. And ultimately deciding I only want to learn from Eddie Izzard.
posted by b2walton on Apr 3, 2010 - 11 comments

Art Myths

Six Myths of the Art Market [more inside]
posted by Mitheral on Mar 27, 2010 - 55 comments

Painting From History

Tomokazu Matsuyama was born in Japan. He moved to the US when he was around ten years old, not speaking any English, and being overwhelmed by the culture shock of 1980s Los Angeles. His artistic work is a reflection of this upbringing. Matsuyama’s paintings envision traditional Japanese imagery through the lens of American pop art, creating a unique and beautiful hybrid. He strives to portray this global melee through a conscious “appropriation” of all of his influences: cultural, artistic, and personal. Matsuyama’s unconflicted and positively ebullient works do not ask, “What am I?,” but assert, “I am everybody.” (via) [more inside]
posted by netbros on Nov 29, 2009 - 14 comments

Exploring Color

Rachell Sumpter takes color and detail to the extreme in her art exhibits, reminiscent of Fantasia in a sense. Sumpter is developing quite the portfolio as demonstrated at the Richard Heller Gallery. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Oct 22, 2009 - 9 comments

International Fine Art

The Images of Eyes Gallery exhibits images and paintings of eyes by international artists, featuring work from about 200 artists from Algeria to Zimbabwe. Gallery I contains figurative paintings, oil and watercolor paintings, portraits, charcoal and ink drawings, lithographs, sculpture, digital, and other fine art content. Gallery II exhibits nude paintings, so may be NSFW.
posted by netbros on Oct 11, 2009 - 10 comments

The pictures and sketches of JRR Tolkien

The pictures and sketches of JRR Tolkien
posted by nthdegx on Sep 16, 2009 - 24 comments

Sometimes you have to dig for inspiration

Apes do it. Birds do it. Even educated elephants do it. But can a dog do it? Can a dog make art? Meet Tillamook Cheddar, an adorable Jack Russell Terrier who, after 19 solo shows, has made more than $100,000 in sales of paintings like these. (I believe she did not choose the titles.) Opinions on her work vary. [more inside]
posted by maudlin on Jul 25, 2009 - 33 comments

I like trains

Paintings of trains. I like the energy of this one, but there are enough for everyone to have a favorite. [more inside]
posted by winna on May 9, 2009 - 14 comments

Art In HD

Zoom in to brush-stroke level detail of the masters at the World's First HD Online Art Exhibition. At SXSW 2009, France's Zoomorama showed off its latest collaboration with Bridgeman Art Library. So far the collection features the work of only three artists, but for those of us who like to make museum security nervous by getting really close, the results are pretty amazing, and the implications for future exhibitions are exciting. [Flash]
posted by Rykey on Apr 25, 2009 - 3 comments

A Whirling Phantasmagoria

Elphenden — elphen things from Sergei Tretiakov, 1967-2003. In between there were big cities, isolated islands, cannabis, oceans, pain and love...
posted by netbros on Apr 23, 2009 - 7 comments

Boy in the Water

Boy in the Water ― The website of artist Miran Kim. Her art is characterized by an eerie, gruesome quality, which she achieves without the use of computer effects. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Dec 17, 2008 - 12 comments

Garden and Cosmos

A rare glimpse into a forgotten Hindu world.
Garden and Cosmos - The Royal Paintings of Jodhpur. Virtually none of the 60 works on view in "Garden and Cosmos" have ever been published or seen by scholars since their creation centuries ago.
All paintings are from the Mehrangarh museum. ( whose links are also full of interest ). [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Nov 29, 2008 - 5 comments

The Isle of the Dead

The picture of a boat approaching a wooded island held a strange sway over the early twentieth century imagination. Strindberg closes The Ghost Sonata with the image; Rachmaninoff brought forth a symphonic poem from it; Freud, Lenin, and Clemenceau all owned prints, while Hitler hung one of the original five paintings on his wall. The work's creator, a Swiss Symbolist painter named Arnold Böcklin, never cared to give it a name. It was an art dealer who first called it Die Toteninsel"The Isle of the Dead."
posted by Iridic on Oct 31, 2008 - 27 comments

Contemporary Art

Hilda Magazine ― prose, poetry, illustrations, photography, video, and music from a wide assortment contemporary artists. [contains some nude art images] [more inside]
posted by netbros on Oct 29, 2008 - 3 comments

visual connections

Pattern Recognition, mostly serene paintings, illustrations and photographs from a variety of sources, grouped according to similar motifs: Interiors in paintings and more l moon l napes l light and shadow l moments of quiet intimacy, daydreams, dreams l very early Vogue and Vanity Fair covers 1, 2 and 3 l portraits of children and more l children's book illustrations l flora. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Oct 19, 2008 - 9 comments

The Grand Tour...in York

The Grand Tour is back, and this time it's in York. [Previously]
posted by djgh on Jun 6, 2008 - 9 comments

Hitler defaced

Jake and Dinos Chapman have bought a stack of Adolf Hitlers paintings for £115,000 and defaced them with rainbows and butterflies for their new show, "If Hitler Had Been a Hippy, How Happy Would We Be". The show also recreates "Fucking Hell", a huge swastika shaped diorama of tiny plastic nazis torturing and killing each other, which had been destroyed in a fire.
posted by Artw on May 31, 2008 - 72 comments

eclectic galleries

artjob.ru is a Russian site worth exploring with some pretty awesome, eclectic galleries (some nsfw). Naoto Hattori, 134 paintings of surrealistic Mona Lisas transformed and more l Child Soldiers Dream Simply of Being Children ads for Amnesty International/photographs by Michael Lewis l Christian Lohfink's playfully mischievous and dark humor photographs l Elliott Erwitt's superb black and white photographs, many iconic l [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Dec 23, 2007 - 17 comments

Art to Go

The Grand Tour. Until August 31st, the National Gallery in England is putting reproductions of famous paintings on the streets of London, with MP3 audio guides and maps available for download. The reaction has been good.
posted by djgh on Aug 5, 2007 - 22 comments

Art Isn't Monkey Business.

Portraits of Stuffed Monkeys.
posted by brain_drain on Jul 27, 2006 - 9 comments

Not a subject you often see in paintings...

The young people that have volunteered for this series have all endured physical pain and personal tragedy. They have developed a strong sense of 'self ' at an early age in order to survive public alienation due to their appearance.

Doug Auld's State of Grace - Paintings of Burn Survivors. via
posted by dobbs on Jun 21, 2006 - 26 comments

A life at high altitudes

The Nicholas Roerich Museum in New York City, houses paintings by Nicholas Roerich, a Russian artist, who spent most of his life on the Indian-Tibetan border, creating evocative images of night and day in the Himalayan Mountains. (more inside)
posted by nickyskye on Jun 15, 2006 - 15 comments

Giovanni Boldini, the Master of Swish

In 1872, influenced by the Impressionists at the Exposition Universelle, Italian painter Giovanni Boldini permanently settled in Paris. There, he quickly developed a reputation for his elegant depictions of fashionable society women executed with bold, fluid brushstrokes that made the model appear to be thrown onto the canvas -- the "Master of Swish". By the turn of the century Boldini had become the most sought after portrait painter of the 'La Belle Epoque'. More inside.
posted by matteo on Jan 27, 2006 - 9 comments

Zdzislaw Beksinski

Zdzislaw Beksinski (warning: music) produced some hauntingly beautiful, disturbing works of art: many, many paintings, as well as photographs, drawings, and digital creations. Sadly, he was killed earlier this year.
posted by Gator on Nov 13, 2005 - 11 comments

Caravaggio's lost painting

The Caravaggio Trail: "The Lost Painting". (BugMeNot for the New York Times). more inside
posted by matteo on Nov 13, 2005 - 9 comments

Henri Rousseau at Tate Modern

When Henri met Pablo. Wandering through the rue des Martyrs in 1908, Picasso stopped beside an upholstery shop. "A head peered out, the face of a woman, hard eyes, a penetrating look, decisiveness and clarity. The canvas was huge. I enquired about the price. 'A hundred sous,' replied the dealer. 'You can paint over it.' It was one of the truest portraits ever of the French psyche."
Henri Rousseau's five-franc, life-size woman in Van Dyck black stayed at Picasso's side until his death, longer than any flesh-and-blood muse. A century later, she towers over us at Tate Modern's Rousseau retrospective as imperiously as a Velázquez monarch. More inside.
posted by matteo on Nov 5, 2005 - 21 comments

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