47 posts tagged with art and portraits. (View popular tags)
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Hidden youth and humor: Jason Yarmosky painting his grandparents

'Madeline L’Engle said, “The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been.” I know that when I’m meeting older people, anyone for that matter, you look in the person’s eyes and their eyes are behind the façade. You feel more connected with somebody’s soul in that sense. So instead of judging a book by its cover, looking at this old person like maybe they’re not capable of this or that, I wanted to show how full and beautiful they are. They’ve already lived what I’m living. They have so much knowledge, and they’re still living.' Jason Bard Yarmosky on the portraits of his grandparents: Elder Kinder (2011), Elder Kinder (2012), Dream of the Soft Look (2013) [via Everlasting Blort] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 14, 2014 - 7 comments

 

Kumi Yamashita, "Constellation"

This body of work consists of three simple materials that, when combined, produce the portraits: a wooden panel painted a solid white, thousands of small galvanized nails, and a single, unbroken, common sewing thread.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Feb 21, 2014 - 9 comments

Under the skin

"X-ray images usually show the finite nature of our bodies composed only of matter. But these couples' portraits reveal a pulse that isn’t normally seen." —Ayako Kanda and Mayuka Hayashi.
posted by Athanassiel on Dec 4, 2013 - 15 comments

What Jane Saw

On May 24th, 1813, Jane Austen visited a blockbuster art exhibition--the first major retrospective of Sir Joshua Reynolds, the premier English portraitist of the 18th century. Debuting 200 years to the day later, What Jane Saw is a room-by-room virtual recreation of the exhibition, based on the original catalog of the paintings and contemporary depictions of the building where it was held.
posted by Horace Rumpole on May 27, 2013 - 8 comments

A Portrait A Day Keeps Myself Sane

A Portrait A Day Keeps Myself Sane. Line portraits from David Johnson. E.g., Edward Bulwer-Lytton; Virginia Woolf; Samuel Beckett; Elton John & Leon Russell.
posted by OmieWise on Oct 19, 2012 - 4 comments

Wedged.

I have no idea how these people got wedged into their scanners, or why. Oh wait, I do. Artist Enrico Nagel, in his series "Behind the Glass", makes portraits that way.
posted by CheeseDigestsAll on Sep 7, 2012 - 10 comments

Are You Lonesome Tonight?

Iconic Portraits Formed by Clusters of Tiny People. Starting his creative career as a street artist, Craig Alan developed his portraiture skills while earning a living to further fund his artistic pursuits. Since that point, the artist has been honing in on his craft and creating something more than your average portrait. He represents people as an amalgam of other people. The artist's portfolio boasts a series of inventive portraits of iconic figures whose visage appears to be composed of tiny pixels. Upon closer inspection, the spectator can see that the pixels are, in fact, people. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Jul 2, 2012 - 14 comments

"If I didn't create art I would go crazy and this is a good enough reason to carry on."

"I draw with a Biro pen, i paint with anything. I often run into the sea." Mark Powell draws old people on old envelopes with a plain old ballpoint pen. [more inside]
posted by taz on Mar 11, 2012 - 11 comments

The Beauty of an Ugly Addiction

Belgian photographer Frieke Janssens snapped controversial (and artistic) portraits of children between the ages of four and nine smoking fake cigarettes. The photo shoot in action was recorded and her portfolio can be seen here. (Previously) [more inside]
posted by gman on Nov 23, 2011 - 27 comments

Here, use cream

Nostromo Crew Portraits
posted by Artw on Oct 21, 2011 - 62 comments

Spiral Art

Spiral art by Chan Hwee Chong.
posted by ericb on Oct 14, 2011 - 18 comments

'The most excellent painter that England hath yet bred'

Britain's finest Baroque portraitist, on a par with Frans Hals, has been all but forgotten, but a new BBC documentary and associated website seek to address that. William Dobson, 1611-46, was painter to Charles I's court during the English Civil War, and the turmoil of the period meant that much of his biography and even the names of the subjects of his portraits were lost. But many of his portraits have survived, and they're astonishing. [more inside]
posted by rory on Oct 1, 2011 - 18 comments

El Pintor Con Las Letras

Throughout the world, El Mac's grand spraypaint portraits combine with RETNA's cryptic, hieroglyphic language to create stunning murals.
posted by klangklangston on Sep 2, 2011 - 14 comments

The Way Of All Flesh

British figurative painter Lucian Freud, whose uncompromising, fleshy portraits made him one of the world's most revered and coveted artists, has died aged 88. Tate Gallery Google image search. [NSFWish]
posted by chavenet on Jul 21, 2011 - 42 comments

People Staring at Computers

The US Secret Service has raided the home of an artist who collected images from webcams in a New York Apple store. The tumblr is still up, as is a explanation of the project by the artist at F.A.T.
posted by chavenet on Jul 8, 2011 - 68 comments

As long as something creates a reaction it’s alive.

The Embroidered Secrets of Maurizio Anzeri
posted by dobbs on Jun 28, 2011 - 11 comments

"I realized that I was in probably in the greatest sweets shop I shall ever find."

"It had a sign outside it saying Museum of the Americas, but no one ever visited it. Anyway, so he opened this door, turned on the lights one by one, and the sight that met my eyes is something I shall never, ever forget because instead of a congregation of people in this disused church, it was a congregation of portraits." Philip Mould, an art expert and a host of the British version of Antiques Roadshow, describes an early business trip where he met Earle Newton. Newton's home grown Museum of the Americas, a collection of over 300 rare 17th- and 18th-century English and American portraits, was housed in a nondescript church on the side of a road in rural Vermont. The collection, later valued at over nine million dollars, became the Earle W. Newton Center for British and American Studies at the Savannah College of Art and Design upon Newton's death. [via]
posted by jessamyn on Nov 9, 2010 - 14 comments

Voom Portraits

Voom Portraits
Robert Downey Jr. | Johnny Depp | Winona Ryder
Ivory | Willem Dafoe | Princess Caroline of Monaco
Isabella Rossellini | Kool | Steve Buscemi | Samson
Boris | Brad Pitt | William Pope L.
posted by carsonb on Oct 5, 2010 - 46 comments

Retratos Pintados

Retratos Pintados "Since the late 19th century through the 1990s, hand-painted photographic portraits were a common feature in homes in the rural areas of the northeastern Brazilian states. At a time when black-and-white photographs were not considered dramatic enough, the retratos pintados (“painted portraits”) glamorized and idealized their subjects. Black-and-white family photos were enlarged and painted, conferring status on members of the family and portraying them as icons or saints. Using oil washes and other techniques specific to the region, local artisans embellished clothing with pattern and color, smoothed wrinkles, added jewelry or resurrected deceased relatives, illustrating the fantasies and desires of their customers."
posted by puny human on Jul 19, 2010 - 7 comments

The artist is present.

As part of the current retrospective of her work at MoMA, Marina Abramović is performing "The Artist is Present," in which she sits in a chair at a table for the duration of the museum's opening hours and invites visitors to sit across from her for as long as they wish. Watch the performance live. Photographer Marco Anelli has been taking photos of the participants for the museum, noting the duration of their participation: 5 min., 10 min., 391 min. [via kottke] [more inside]
posted by ocherdraco on Apr 22, 2010 - 53 comments

Mr. Potato Head

Portraits painted on potatoes by Lebanese artist Ginou Choueir.
posted by gman on May 21, 2009 - 13 comments

Aino Kannisto Photography

Aino Kannisto 's beautifully composed photographs of intimate moments feel more like film stills than portraits. [via] [more inside]
posted by grapefruitmoon on Jan 30, 2009 - 19 comments

pathos and pathology

"Hidden within the basement archives of Yale University's Historical Medical Library lie the original oil painting collection and personal papers of the first American surgeon to practice in China." Extraordinary paintings of compassion in a medical setting. [Warning, these are graphic depictions, some NSFW] Elegant, disturbing and moving portraits of patients by Lam Qua, commissioned by a medical missionary named Peter Parker in the 1830's. [No, not that Peter Parker. Via MeFite tellurian's awesome blog]. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Sep 2, 2008 - 20 comments

Portraits of Phone Sex Operators by Phillip Toledano.

Portraits of Phone Sex Operators by Phillip Toledano.
posted by chunking express on Jun 11, 2008 - 55 comments

I paint self portraits because I am the person I know best

La Real Frida offers beautiful film footage of Frida Kahlo.* Beyond her own self-portraits, some of the most iconic images of Frida are portraits by her 10-year lover, photographer Nickolas Muray. [more inside]
posted by madamjujujive on Feb 25, 2008 - 26 comments

Mix and match portraiture

Stereotypes are oddly addictive. Don't miss the earlier editions.
posted by desjardins on Feb 2, 2008 - 8 comments

Take one a day and call me in the morning

365 Portraits, 365 audio pieces, 365 speculative fiction pieces, 365 plays. All because one a day is good for the soul.
posted by TNLNYC on Jul 16, 2007 - 5 comments

Lautrec's models in photographs

Photographs of the dancers, actresses, cafe-life figures and prostitutes who were the subjects of Toulouse Lautrec's paintings, including such luminaries as Sarah Bernhardt, "La Goulue" (Louise Weber; remember this?), and Jane Avril, who was the model for this last, iconic, Lautrec poster. View pages of the art matched up with photos, here, here, and here, and go to this page to rummage around in even more collections that include photos of Lautrec, his friends and family, street and location scenes, and lots of other tidbits. [Spanish language site; NUDITY]
posted by taz on Jul 5, 2007 - 10 comments

She's a beauty

500 Years of Female Portraits in Western Art in 3 minutes. List of artists inside.
posted by vronsky on May 25, 2007 - 39 comments

On your mark ... get set ... drawer

Drawer Geeks is an illustration challenge founded by Greg Hardin. Alternate Fridays, a group of 25+ professional animators, illustrators, cartoonists, and designers riff on a given fictional character. This past week's theme was Santa Claus. Among archived themes, I particularly liked: Medusa and The Grim Reaper. (via diminished Responsibility)
posted by madamjujujive on Dec 17, 2006 - 34 comments

the impressionists' secret weapon

Did you know that some of the most famous paintings by Van Gogh, Gauguin, Degas, and Toulouse Lautrec were based on photographs? While some impressionists and post-impressionists publicly disparaged photography as mechanical, many others were using it as their secret weapon. The relationship between the two arts was complex and intertwined. (And turning the tables, check out this contemporary Russian woman who is recreating several famous paintings in staged photographs.)
posted by madamjujujive on Nov 12, 2006 - 27 comments

witty portraits

Pablo Lobato is an Argentinian graphic artist who uses color and geometric shape to create witty portraits and caricatures. More works are available at his website (sound & flash alert). His site's select links to other caricaturists are great, including David Cowles who he names as an influence and the brilliant Hannoch Piven.
posted by madamjujujive on Aug 22, 2006 - 15 comments

Art Isn't Monkey Business.

Portraits of Stuffed Monkeys.
posted by brain_drain on Jul 27, 2006 - 9 comments

Burned

Burned: a photoset on Flickr "In 2001 I met a burn survivor who allowed me to photograph her. She told me that she wanted to be photographed so that people could stare at her without feeling embarrassed. It was such an extraordinary experience that a few months later I flew to a burn conference and set up a makeshift studio in a hotel room, and asked people to let me know if they would like their portraits made. I was astonished at how many people did. What I learned from this extraordinary experience was that every burn survivor has a tale of courage to tell, and that the burns have their own eerie beauty." Amazing, unsettling, inspiring.
posted by mathowie on Jun 30, 2006 - 48 comments

Gum Blondes

Gum Blondes Celebrity portraits done in chewed gum. By artist Jason Kronenwald.
posted by grapefruitmoon on May 10, 2006 - 31 comments

The Dora Decade: Picasso and Maar

Dora Maar was immortalized by Picasso in many portraits, one of which is up for auction this May. Tho many are familiar with her face, fewer are aware that she was a respected surrealist photographer in her own right. An exhibit at the Musee Picasso in Paris documents the stormy and artistically rich decade of their relationship via the contents of Dora Maar's estate.
posted by madamjujujive on Feb 26, 2006 - 9 comments

Germaine Greer on posing for Diane Arbus

Wrestling with Diane Arbus "She set up no lights, just pulled out her Rolleiflex, which was half as big as she was, checked the aperture and the exposure, and tested the flash. Then she asked me to lie on the bed, flat on my back on the shabby counterpane. I did as I was told. Clutching the camera she climbed on to the bed and straddled me, moving up until she was kneeling with a knee on both sides of my chest. She held the Rolleiflex at waist height with the lens right in my face. She bent her head to look through the viewfinder on top of the camera, and waited".
posted by matteo on Oct 8, 2005 - 25 comments

Fazel Sheikh's Refugees

Fazal Sheikh's photographs have documented the plight of refugees in camps across Central and East Africa and the Middle East. However, his photographs are distinctly different from the images of refugees we commonly see in printed news articles. Sheikh's photographs implicitly assert that the individual refugees share humanity with their oppressive rulers. He does so by depicting the individuals in portraits rather than as victims of a social and political drama. Sheikh, an American citizen, was just awarded the Grand Prix International Henri Cartier-Bresson.
posted by matteo on Jun 24, 2005 - 5 comments

Rembrandt at the Getty

Rembrandt's Late Religious Portraits. No one knows why Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn began painting half-length portraits of religious figures late in his life. The subject was uncommon in Protestant Amsterdam, where he lived. Paintings and sculptures, deemed idolatrous by Luther's followers, were not permitted in churches; existing images were removed and often destroyed. In 1681, a local authority described Rembrandt as the "foremost heretic in the art of painting." In Los Angeles, the Getty Center brings together, for the first time, 16 of these mysterious paintings. More inside.
posted by matteo on Jun 18, 2005 - 11 comments

Auntie Hero

20th-century American artist, Alice Neele, "The Auntie Hero": "While Uptowners were making their way downtown to have their portraits painted by Warhol, Downtowners were going up to 107th Street to sit for this bohemian, auntie-like artist." Check out seven decades of raw, sometimes amazing, but always deeply humane portraits of the often larger-than-life figures who peopled the New York art/lit scene and Neel's personal landscape, including such iconic irrepressibles as Joe Gould, Andy Warhol, Annie Sprinkle, and Bella Abzug. (NSFW)
posted by taz on Sep 16, 2004 - 13 comments

Bug Portraits

Bug Portraits by Frank Phillips. ". . .I always keep in mind the goal of capturing the bug from an angle that we humans don't normally see...and I believe that it shows in my work."
posted by Feisty on Mar 9, 2004 - 15 comments

Celebrity caricatures by Piven

Piven World - a fun flash portfolio of celebrity caricatures and portraits. I like his witty technique of incorporating "defining" objects. (via oink!)
posted by madamjujujive on Jul 2, 2003 - 5 comments

James Gillray

James Gillray (1757-1815) One of the all-time great caricaturists, now extensively digitized by the National Portrait Gallery. (Scroll down to the bottom of the page for the links.) For other good collections, see the offerings from Bucknell and the Tate. Today, the most immediately recognizable Gillray is The Plumb-Pudding in Danger, although I'm quite fond of Promis'd Horrors of the French Invasion. A few of Gillray's famous French Revolution caricatures are featured at the Napoleonic Guide; for images with commentary, see this page by the Romanticist Duncan Wu. I've always wanted to own a Gillray, although I'm not sure that I'd want Presages of the Millenium--a particularly creepy Pitt as Death--on my wall.
posted by thomas j wise on May 10, 2003 - 5 comments

Miscellaneous Mona Mania

The lady with the mystic smile - over the years, she's been stolen, lampooned, revered in song (mp3 file) and the subject of mystery and mania for many. Her visage has been been the inspiration for socks, cookie jars, bathtub toys and lots of kitsch and pop art. What's the secret to the world's long standing love affair with this lady?
posted by madamjujujive on Jan 30, 2003 - 32 comments

Manimals

Manimals - discover the strange and unsettling world of photographer-digital artist Daniel Lee and his darwinian art.
posted by madamjujujive on Oct 25, 2002 - 15 comments

Jorge Colombo

Jorge Colombo has been creating daily portraits of New Yorkers for almost three years straight. While in the past they've tended towards the whimsical, after September 11th, they took on a different tone. [via media nugget]
posted by mathowie on Dec 28, 2001 - 7 comments

The Queen's latest portrait was bound to cause controversy, what with the artist being Lucien Freud. Today a photograph of it was plastered over the front pages of nearly every major newspaper. The tabloid press are, as ever, 'up in arms' about it. I rather like it, but the palace isn't commenting as yet.
posted by davehat on Dec 21, 2001 - 40 comments

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