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54 posts tagged with art by adamvasco.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 54.

Use Photography as a Weapon

The Extraordinary Anti-Nazi Photomontages of John Heartfield, a dadist who collaborated with George Grosz and had a lifelong friend in Brecht.
This is a tribute website from his grandson.
Heartfield pioneered photomontage and inspired Siouxsie and the Banshees Metal Postcard.
Essay from the Getty and a little more.
(Previously ''The Man who Pissed off Hitler.'' but fpp links are dead.)
posted by adamvasco on Jun 9, 2014 - 10 comments

Madonna of the sailors

Little remembered Suzy Solidor was frequently an artists model.
Some of the images are NSFW
Starting in the early 1920´s she was painted by Foujita possibly after their shared holiday in Deauville and then in 1927 by the fauvist Kees von Dongen.
In 1930 she opened her nightclub La Vie Parisienne the same year modelling in a BSDM take for Man Ray among others.
In 1933 her lover Tamara Lempicka ( previously ) painted her.
Like her friend Jean Cocteau (pictured 1938) she collaboratored during the occupation by keeping her club open and in 1940 Picabia painted her and she became known as the Madonna of the Sailors.
Here is a recording of her version of Lily Marlene and some more
She moved to Cagnes sur Mer after the war and modelled up to her death in 1983 (Marie-Pascale Deleun)
She left her portraits to the Chateau Grimaldi museum.
posted by adamvasco on May 18, 2014 - 14 comments

“Great art is horseshit, buy tacos.”

I am not really quite sure how to describe the website MELT except to warn you to prepare to be away for a very long time. (NSFW).
Incorporating works of artists (Be sure to scroll down) both surreal and illustration and sculpters and photographers and documentaries and mixtapes and so much more.
Probably the best way to get around is to just click on the various labels.
Happy Travels
posted by adamvasco on Sep 9, 2013 - 7 comments

Myth is the facts of the mind made manifest in a fiction of matter.

Maya Deren has been called The High Priestess of Experimental Cinema.
Probably her greatest work was Meshes of the Afternoon a 13min. silent movie made in 1943.
Here is a review and some stills and clips from her work.
The music is by Teiji Ito who later became her third husband. (See also).
Maya Deren was one of the influences on David Lynch.
posted by adamvasco on Aug 6, 2013 - 13 comments

There’s strictly nothing morbid in my work.

Jim's skullgallery; be sure to click sculpture and then the little numbers and you will see more like these with their inspiration in Amerindian and Oceanian cult objects .
A short interview with Jim Skull.
posted by adamvasco on Jun 22, 2013 - 5 comments

Introducing bowoodling, friskadoodling and alabamaraminating.

The Love Life of the Spumifers. (NSFW)
A series of hand-painted photographic postcards produced by surrealist artist Georges Hugnet master of collage between 1947 and 1948.
posted by adamvasco on Jun 8, 2013 - 3 comments

The Incredibly True Adventures of Gerda Wegener and Lili Elbe.

The true story (NSFW) of turn-of-the-century lesbian romance, erotic Deco illustrations rife with harlequins and crinolines, the world’s first male-to-female sex reassignment surgery, and the 1950s pulp novel that brought it all to light. A Decree by the King of Denmark was required to Free Danish Artist from the wife he had married before his sex was reversed. How the divorce was reported in 1933.
Some more of Gerda's work.
posted by adamvasco on Jun 3, 2013 - 8 comments

You've heard of animal magic, well then, what's wrong with bird magic.

Running in the The Times Educational Supplement (1), between 1971 and 1972 the comic strip Wokker featured a strange wooden bird who commentates sarcastically on the world, and who can talk to animals, inanimate objects and readers alike.
Here are some galleries and a short history by the co-creator Tony Earnshaw, also a painter and maker of boxes.
His funeral in 2001 was slightly unconventional.
posted by adamvasco on May 18, 2013 - 4 comments

'Charles, he likes men or women?' "Charles? He likes flowers''.

Marie-Laure Noailles was a direct descendant of the Maquis de Sade, himself a Surrealist muse.
Together with her husband Charles she was their patron, possibly one of the greatest Art Patrons of the Twentieth Century. The couple spent much of the year at their villa in the South of France.
Charles preferred his gardens and his gym instuctor, and she embarked on a of a series of affairs, notably Jean Cocteau whose film Blood of a Poet was financed by them. They also financed Man Ray's Les Mystères du Château de Dé and Bunuel and Dali's L'Age d'Or (a scene in the garden) and Biceps et Bijoux for Jacques Manuel. Dali also painted her portrait as did Balthus another of her protégés.
Apart from film and art they also commisiones Francis Poulenc's Aubade.
Marie-Laure was photographed by Man Ray and her good friend Dora Maar. (Previous some links dead ).
Charles and her Marie-Laure although living seperate lives stayed the best of friends for the rest of their lives often phoning each other several times a day. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on May 8, 2013 - 6 comments

Because we all need to dream a little

one surrealist a day.
Old and New Surrealist Art with occasional photography and poetry. Complete with search function.
As an extra a sampling of French surrealist poetry in translation. There are also some short films on Vimeo.
posted by adamvasco on Mar 28, 2013 - 6 comments

Parnassien de coeur.

In the heart of the neighborhood of Montparnasse,
live the memories of a forgotten photographer: Émile Savitry.
In 1930 he was with Django Reinhardt and in 1939 He photographed the Spanish refugees who migrated to Perpignan after the fall of Barcelona.
He photographed some of the movie sets of Marcel Carné and Pigalle and Anais Ninn.
In 1945 he photographed Tahitian soldiers of the French Pacific Battalion and later 1950's fashion. For those who read French here is a little more about him.
posted by adamvasco on Feb 14, 2013 - 4 comments

Holding back the night -With its increasing brilliance -The summer moon

Vania Zouravliov was a child prodigy inspired from an early age by influences as diverse as The Bible, Dante, early Disney animation, North American Indians and Poe.
Told in Russia that his work was from the Devil, he has described his pieces as having a Hoffmannesque feel, and has always been interested in creating graphic art in its purest form. Others call his work a blend of Rock Chic and Punk.
Here is an extensive Gallery, (Some pictures NSFW).
posted by adamvasco on Feb 12, 2013 - 10 comments

The Grand Master of Anything Goes.

(NSFW) Clovis Trouille was a French anti clericist and anarchist painter.
He could be called the spiritual godfather of Lowbrow Art or an Angel of Bad Taste. ( Some Repeats.)
It was one of his paintings that inspired Ken Tynan in 1969 to call his review Oh Calcutta.
posted by adamvasco on Feb 4, 2013 - 11 comments

NSFW: We like to entertain… ourselves mainly...

NSFW We like to entertain… ourselves mainly… and it’s a comedy show much of the time, with little more than white walls and floorboards for a stage.
''Old Master'' shoots with just a cell phone or ipad. His compositions are definitely outside the norm, all with a cast of volunteers, no models.
This is amateur dramatics with a difference. (NSFW. BDSM, bondage, fetish).
Some of this work is included in this online book.
posted by adamvasco on Jan 31, 2013 - 3 comments

NSFW. Changing female body image through art

The Great Wall of Vagina an exhibition by English artist Jamie McCartney described as a revolutionary with a bucket of plaster.
Included in the exhibition is Physical Photography which brings echoes of Cynthia Plaster Caster.
Then there are Great Wall of Vagina Videos.
For those wanting a cast of their vagina the artist Mearle Gates is the man to turn to.
posted by adamvasco on Jan 17, 2013 - 80 comments

We declare the world as our canvas

Street art; we see it every day from Rio to Paris and even the Lebanon.
But then there is Guerrilla Crochet.
posted by adamvasco on Nov 3, 2012 - 14 comments

Could you explain some of the words used on your website?

John Coulthart's first illustration work was for the album Church of Hawkwind in 1982.
Since then he has become prolific together with his art and design blog ‘’Feuilliton’’. (linked before on the blue, but only for specifics).
His weekend edition is a timesink; and then are his illustrations for The Haunter of the Dark
To understand more about him read some interviews.
From 2004 Could you explain some of the words used on your website: {retinacula} {pleonasm} {pantechnicon} {oniomania} {decalcomania} {catenation} {bibliopoesy}?
Are they in Latin or did you just make some of them up?
Or most recently earlier this year.
posted by adamvasco on Oct 9, 2012 - 11 comments

“I paint pictures which do not exist and which I would like to see.”

Argentine born sometime Surrealist artist Leonor Fini was a Cat lover, extraordinaire.
She depicted women exploring their own identity at a time when female identity both physically and mentally was being defined by men, once declaring:
A woman should live with two men; one more a lover and the other more a friend.
Photographed by many; showing her dressed in Cat costume or sitting with one of her numerous cats; and her art frequently figured them somewhere or other.
More photographs of her and a video. Like the rest of her work some are NSFW and some feature cats. A brief biography.
posted by adamvasco on Aug 31, 2012 - 7 comments

Dreams are symbolic in order that they cannot be understood.

Beautiful as the chance meeting of an umbrella and a sewing machine.
Gromyko Semper is a young Filipino artist whose influences are the Surrealists - Hommage to Cornell; The game Exquiste Corpse - Dreams that LittleZyrus Play and collaboration - Orchidoplasmic union.
Together with Hindu cosmologies - The Spectres of Kali with explanation and Kabbalistic spiritual cosmology - The Shedding of the Spectres of Qlipoth.
Here are his Galleries on Deviant Art with his woodcut series and from Surrealism Now and from Saatchi..
An interview featuring more of his work. (All images are magnifyable; there are possibly some repeats; some images possibly NSFW).
posted by adamvasco on Aug 7, 2012 - 6 comments

Harlem 1927

In 1927 Miguel Covarrubias published Negro Drawings ( nsfw ).
Here are some of his cartoons for Vanity Fair and other publications.
posted by adamvasco on Jul 7, 2012 - 8 comments

In the land of the Old Masters, the multimedia technician is increasingly king.

Factum Arte in Madrid has made an animation film based on Giovanni Battista Piranesi's Carceri d'Invenzione prints; and have also built many of his pieces which shows the workings of his imagination, merging his architectural ambitions with his obsessive interest in antiquity. Giovanni Battista Piranesi was a source of inspiration for, among others, Goya, Poe, Escher, Max Ernst, De Chirico. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Jun 13, 2012 - 4 comments

Czech out this L'Enfant Terrible

Karel Teige was a major figure in the Czech avant-garde; a writer, designer, typographer and collagist.
He was a member of Devětsil and later joined the Prague Surrealist group with Toyen and Jindrich Styrsky.
Here are some of his Book Covers of the 1920- and 1930's and 1926 he made ABECEDA with each letter posed by the dancer Milca Mayerová. Here is a video reconstruction of the dance moves.
Teige died in 1951 of a heart attack, said to be a result of a ferocious Soviet press campaign against him as a 'Trotskyite degenerate,' his papers were destroyed by the secret police, and his published work was suppressed for decades. The Central European Review has some articles on his work.
posted by adamvasco on May 9, 2012 - 5 comments

dadadadadada....puppets.....da da..da da..da da

The female members of the Dada movement are not so well known.
Sophie Taeuber was into puppets as was Hannah Höch; 2 & 3 and Emmy Hennings. Taeuber and Hennings were both heavily involved in Cabaret Voltaire.
A brief history of Radical Puppetry (Hannah Höch previously).
posted by adamvasco on May 7, 2012 - 15 comments

The Artist who loved India's Soul

Svetoslav Roerich (work down the galleries on the left) was described in a tribute on his 100th birthday as The Artist who loved India's Soul.
Like his father Nicholas (previously); he was a painter and philosopher. The family foundation page has more on this extraordinary family. In 1954 Svetoslav married the widow Devika Rani who with her first husband Himansu Rai had made India's first English language talking movie which became a cause célèbre for India's first (and longest) onscreen kiss.
posted by adamvasco on Apr 29, 2012 - 8 comments

Just on six days and six nights

143 hours and four ink pens. [via mefi projects]. Sometimes talent needs a wider audience.
posted by adamvasco on Apr 27, 2012 - 29 comments

Art will Out

Two Cubans are exhibiting their art in Britain – despite being imprisoned in the US.
The pair are members of the so-called Miami Five, who were jailed in the US in 2001 at the conclusion of a controversial trial.
They are Antonio Guerrero and Gerardo Hernández and their work will be exhibited alongside that of many other cuban artists.
There is a National Committee to Free the Cuban Five.
posted by adamvasco on Apr 20, 2012 - 3 comments

Knot for everybody

(NSFW) The contemporary meaning of Shibari describes an ancient Japanese artistic form of rope bondage.
Hikari Kesho aka Alberto Lisi is an Italian photographer, some of whose Shibari photography could be called sublime.
Fotofest 2012 Biennial – The Art of Contemporary Shibari Exhibit is currently running with these artists, all of whom have links to their websites, some of which are more extreme than others.
posted by adamvasco on Apr 18, 2012 - 50 comments

Fashion for Friday

Remarked by her contemporary Coco Chanel as "That Italian artist who makes clothes" Elsa Schiaparelli (New Yorker - Janet Flanner) bought Surrealism to fashion. She was one of the most influential creators of Parisian haute couture in the era between the two World Wars. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Mar 16, 2012 - 12 comments

An Illustrator of Decadence

Best known for his 1929 illustrations of Les Fleurs du Mal by Charles Baudelaire (translated here); Beresford Egan (wiki) also illustrated the dust jacket for Aleister Crowley´s Moonchild.
The year previously he published an illustrated parody on the banning of Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness.
In 1934 he published But the Sinners Triumph. His first wife was Catherine Bower Alcock aka Brian De Shane.
posted by adamvasco on Mar 8, 2012 - 6 comments

Avant-garde rooted in nineteenth century aesthethicism

Santiago Caruso is an Illustrator from Buenos Aires who sometimes refers to himself as a graphic journalist. He has illustrated books and both album and book covers. He blogs here.
Discovered via The Cabinet of the Solar Plexus Some links NSFW.
posted by adamvasco on Mar 7, 2012 - 3 comments

Artists Curation from all around the internet

les Artistes du Web curated by Tanguy Mignot
posted by adamvasco on Feb 17, 2012 - 2 comments

What you see, I don't see. I look at the details.

NSFW Lucien Clergue is a French Photographer from Arles, and renowned for his Nu zébré.
He was a friend of Picasso and Jean Cocteau.
He still gives the occasional talk: Ansel said to me "I have been here for 40 years and I have never seen what you see."
Clergue: " I am Mediterranean by birth. What you see, I don't see. I look at the details."
posted by adamvasco on Feb 2, 2012 - 5 comments

No escapism here; all dark corners are revealed

Laurie Lipton studied 17th century Dutch masters to develop her own unique style of pencil drawing. (First bought to our attention by misteraitch)
posted by adamvasco on Dec 7, 2011 - 27 comments

The Secret Parisian Painter

Influenced by Bosch, Cranach, Goya and the Surrealists Claude Verlinde who was born in 1927 is a very private magic realist about whose life little seems known. Here is his web presence.
If you understand French, the press pages are interesting. Bonus SLYT slideshow. (NSFW) .
posted by adamvasco on Dec 4, 2011 - 11 comments

It's contemprary and it's good and it's in Barcelona

The Museo Europeu de Art Modern in Barcelona presently has an exhibition of contemporary art featuring many catalan and spanish painters and sculpters and is housed in a restaured palacio (click through the "plantas"). MEAM is associated with figurativas en red.
As this is contemporary art, nudes abound and this post is unfortunately NSFW in many places.
posted by adamvasco on Nov 14, 2011 - 1 comment

I’ve swung far from the straight and narrow path of straight photography

(NSFW) In all of my years of work with the lens (since 1906) I've dreamed of and loved to work with the human figure - to embody it in rocks and trees, to make it part of the elements.
The Glory of the Open - Camera Craft - April 1926.
At a time when decent Christian women in the U.S. were expected to be modest and to achieve fulfillment in motherhood, Anne Brigman was trekking up into the mountains in trousers…a scandal in itself…carrying a heavy pack of camera equipment. There she shucked off her pants and societal expectations, and she entered into a pagan world inhabited by dryads and nixies...and there she made art. Anne photographed herself, her sister, and friends using California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains to backdrop a liberated woman decades ahead of her time.
YouTube slideshow. She was championed into the Photo Secession movement by Alfred Stiglietz, and she was the only woman member from west of the Missouri.
posted by adamvasco on Oct 3, 2011 - 20 comments

'Have you ever been alive? Curious sensation isn't it?'

(This Post is NSFW) Marcel Mariën is frequently referred to as Rene Magritte's surrogate son.
Magritte was so surreal he forged himself as well as producing fake Picassos, Braques and Chiricos which Mariën sold in Paris.
Mariën was an artist in his own right being a poet, photographer and publisher.
In 1943 his De Sade a Lenin marked the beginning of an mainly humorous oeuvre that was to continue through to the mid 1980's.
iphotocentral has a large collection of the work of this trickster.
His 1960 film L’Imitation du Cinéma could not be shown in the USA despite having the the support of the Kinsey Institute. A Biography.
posted by adamvasco on Jun 20, 2011 - 1 comment

Under this mask, another mask

I'm in training - don't kiss me - Daniel Douglas aka Claude Courlis aka Claude Cahun was a French artist, photographer and self confessed narcissist.
She began a long lasting relationship and collaboration with her stepsister Suzanne Malherbe aka Marcel Moore at an early age.
Cahun was imprisoned by the Nazis and condemmed to death but was released shortly before the war ended. She left a diary; and Jersey Heritage Trust has more.
She was also a writer. A short video of some of her self portraits as a slide show.
posted by adamvasco on Apr 12, 2011 - 7 comments

You know, if one paints someone's portrait, one should not know him if possible.

"It is my wish to come very close, strikingly close, to the times in which we live, without submitting to artistic dogma...
I need the connection to the world of senses, the courage to portray ugliness, life as it comes."
Otto Dix best known for his Weimar era work such as the now lost Street Fight.
Probably his most well know portraits are of the uninhibited dancer Anita Berber and of the writer and poet Sylvia von Harden.
Here are a couple of Galleries of his work and a six part video on Dix: Postcards from the front 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6;
posted by adamvasco on Apr 1, 2011 - 9 comments

When Words are Pictures

In 1918 Guillaume Apollinaire published his Calligrammes introducing a type of wordplay still used in France, and occasionally animated (albeit slowly).
However today's nerd totally outdoes them with Typography Portraits.
posted by adamvasco on Mar 7, 2011 - 11 comments

My Art is about your seeing.

James Turrell works with light. His latest London exhibition Bindu Shards is booked out; which means you miss a mental orgasm. However Simon Collins has some photos.
Follows some more of James Turrell's work : -
Skyspace;
Bridget's Bardot;
A frontal Passage;
A 1999 interview;
James Turrell on flikr;
Previously;
more.
posted by adamvasco on Nov 18, 2010 - 14 comments

Goodbye Heyoka

John Kay’s Heyoka Magazine project January 2005 though June 2010 is now completed. All 34 volumes are online.
The Interviews section is a treasure trove from Shirin Neshat to Rick del Savio to David Michael Kennedy
Many reference Native American culture today: Tommy Lightening Bolt and Mala Spotted Eagle and William Under Baggage and Pete Catches
The range is great from Photos of the Apatani in Arunachal Pradesh to extreme bikram yoga and Leonard Cohen Everybody knows. The list goes on. Heyoka has morphed into non duality magazine
posted by adamvasco on Aug 29, 2010 - 2 comments

Dress 'em how you like.

At the 1938 Exposition Internationale du Surréalisme in Paris. each of fifteen artists were given a dressmaker's mannequin as their canvas and encouraged to transform the figure in any way they desired.
The artists included (in order of appearance in this video) Salvador Dalí, Óscar Dominguez, Marcel Duchamp, Léo Malet, André Masson, Joan Miró, Wolfgang Paalen, Kurt Seligmann, Yves Tanguy, Marcel Jean, Max Ernst, Espinoza, Maurice Henry, Sonia Mossé, and Man Ray. Here are some stills.
posted by adamvasco on Aug 12, 2010 - 3 comments

They were Giants.

Minotaure published only 12 issues between 1933 and 1939. The covers were by some of the leading artists of the day century. (via)
posted by adamvasco on Aug 9, 2010 - 14 comments

Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please

Although mainly known as a photojournalist André Kertész had an interesting run in the early Nineteen Thirties with distortion (click through); as is also shown here and here (NSFW; some repitition )
posted by adamvasco on Aug 6, 2010 - 5 comments

Cut it out and stick it together

My name is Angelica Paez and I have been making collages for over 15 years.
Little has changed since then, except now I use sharp scissors. This is her website
posted by adamvasco on Jul 22, 2010 - 8 comments

The Ace of something completely different

In 1940 several Surrealists were biding their time in a Villa near Marseille awaiting their Visa’s to escape from the oncoming Nazis. One way to while away the time was to play the Le Jeu de Marseilles with cards they had made themselves while waiting.
posted by adamvasco on Jul 19, 2010 - 9 comments

Did I really see that.

Fantomatick is a slightly surrealistic often disturbing French photographic blogspot often NSFW.
Just...keep...on... clicking ... away
posted by adamvasco on Jun 8, 2010 - 35 comments

Snap Snap Gone.

A glimpse at some of the Polaroid Collection soon to be auctioned. The Polaroid Archives Provide Snapshot of History
Renowned Polaroid users were Ansel Adams and; very differently Warhol with his mass produced point and shoot.
Ten Artists in praise of Polaroid; and a Newsweek compilation. (Related 1; 2).
posted by adamvasco on May 30, 2010 - 1 comment

"Ja som aquí"

A daily photoblog of the mediterranean island of Mallorca. Checking the tags is a good way to trawl the archive.
food; history; customs and traditions; art
posted by adamvasco on Jul 27, 2009 - 10 comments

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