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40 posts tagged with art by filthy light thief.
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The Green Turtle, the first Asian American super hero returns to comics

If you heard the recent NPR's Codeswitch segment on The Green Turtle, the first Asian superhero created in the United States, you heard descriptions of the 1940s comic. But there's more (so much more!) online. Start with the entire run of The Green Turtle on the amazing Digital Comic Museum, which hosts public domain Golden Age comics (late 1930s until the late 1940s or early 1950s). If you want to know more about Chu F. Hing, the artist behind the original Green Turtle, here's an extensively researched biography on the astounding Chinese American Eyes blog, which covers "famous, forgotten, well-known, and obscure visual artists of Chinese descent in the United States." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 16, 2014 - 6 comments

Christian Zander's abstract generative art

Christian Zander may have a commercial design background, he has a significant amount of work in a more abstract, generative style, as seen in his House and Bike blog posts, and strewn among his work portfolio. He has also worked with animations, both live (Kiss Kiss Kiss - "Ponte 25") and recorded (Kenton Slash Demon - "Ore" / I Got You On Tape - "Run From The Rain").
posted by filthy light thief on May 6, 2014 - 2 comments

Rooms within rooms, endless cities and labyrinthine structures

"I hope that a viewer will be able to put themselves in my spaces. To that end I’ve avoided adding any figures of any kind to inhabit the rooms, so the viewer is free to imagine themselves inhabiting them if they choose. Some people find them claustrophobic, others want to linger. The detail draws in the viewer, though I’ve also seen it repel the odd person. I enjoy the combination of the creepy and the whimsical. Perhaps this boils down to wanting my drawings to be haunted in the same way that my dreams locales often feel haunted." Excerpt from an interview with Matthew Borrett, an artist/illustrator who draws black and white rooms, scenes from unreal worlds, and some more realistic settings.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 9, 2014 - 7 comments

Hidden youth and humor: Jason Yarmosky painting his grandparents

'Madeline L’Engle said, “The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been.” I know that when I’m meeting older people, anyone for that matter, you look in the person’s eyes and their eyes are behind the façade. You feel more connected with somebody’s soul in that sense. So instead of judging a book by its cover, looking at this old person like maybe they’re not capable of this or that, I wanted to show how full and beautiful they are. They’ve already lived what I’m living. They have so much knowledge, and they’re still living.' Jason Bard Yarmosky on the portraits of his grandparents: Elder Kinder (2011), Elder Kinder (2012), Dream of the Soft Look (2013) [via Everlasting Blort] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 14, 2014 - 7 comments

Grumpy Disney: illustrations of Grumpy Cats as Disney Princesses

Eric Proctor, aka Tsaoshin, draws cute monsters, dragons, Disney characters and Grumpy Cats. The last two merge in a short series of images he calls Grumpy Disney, with the various Disney characters (mostly princesses) replaced with Grumpy Cats doing suitably Grumpy Cat things.
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 6, 2014 - 5 comments

Tatsuo Horiuchi: The David Byrne of Excel

Tatsuo Horiuchi came to art late in his life, and with an unusual tool. At age 60, he was inspired by graphs he saw, and started using Microsoft Excel to make art in the style of traditional Japanese scenes. See more on Spoon & Tamago and Bored Panda.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 30, 2013 - 16 comments

Isleworth Mona Lisa: a younger, happier version, or a decent knockoff?

There has long been various lines of speculation about Mona Lisa, including the existence of an earlier version of the painting. A painting purported to be the earlier version was revealed in 2012. The accuracy of the statements are supported by The Mona Lisa Foundation, who have set up an extensive website around the history of the Mona Lisa and other versions, and also prepared a 21 minute documentary with various professionals providing their knowledge on the topic. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 8, 2013 - 24 comments

The Art of Arman: lyrical abstract painter and sculpter of the readymade

Arman, a French-born American artist (given the name Armand Fernandez at birth, later taking the American civil name Armand Pierre Arman) was a notable as both a painter and a sculpter. In his paintings, he moved objects through ink or paint to make the works, while his sculptures consist of "accumulations" and/or destruction/recomposition of objects. On the larger scale, he constructed the Hope for Peace monument (WikiMapia) and Long Term Parking. You can read about Arman on his official site, ArtNet, and The Art Story.
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 22, 2013 - 3 comments

Eurosurrealist paintings of Viktor Safonkin

Viktor Safonkin is an artist who classifies his style as Eurosurrealism, and could be considered more in line with Hieronymus Bosch than Salvador Dalí. Fantastic Visions has more on the artist and some of his art, and you can see a simple gallery of images without titles or details on the Art Odyssey blog. A more complete gallery of work is on Safonik's Facebook page. You can also watch a short (9 min.) film exhibited at the Viktor Safonkin`s expozition in St. Petersburg's Russian Museum. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 8, 2013 - 3 comments

"I was ... working on something else but last night I dreamt of R'lyeh"

The title of Allen Williams' website, "I Just Draw," undersells his works. These are no idle doodles, but rather, as Guillermo del Toro wrote: "Entire worlds flow from Allen Williams' pencil and brush. Creatures and characters more twisted and full of humanity than our imagination dares to conjure. He is an incredible draughtsman and a true original mind." You can see more of Williams' works on his blog. Click on the images to enlarge them. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 3, 2013 - 10 comments

Hi, there. I want to talk to you about ducts. The ones on your turtle.

ライナーノーツ (translation: "liner notes") is a short video clip that makes sense if you imagine a fan of Terry Gilliam was inspired by the animated scenes from Monty Python, but set them in the grim future of Brazil, with the added twist that the dark future is built in/around giant giraffes, turtles, whales, and bison. From the Japanese artist Yuta Ikehara, whose website and additional work is available here (Google auto-translation; via Dark Roasted Blend's post on contemporary Japanese 2D artists)
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 29, 2013 - 1 comment

Nothing I do is a true or absolute reality: Herbert Baglione's urban art

"1000 Shadows" is a series of works by the urban/street artist Herbert Baglione, which consists of spirits escaping from urban settings. His latest creations in this series are set in the empty rooms of an old abandoned psychiatric hospital in the city of Parma in Italy, which further increases the fascinating and frightening ambiance of his creations. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 9, 2013 - 3 comments

Isaac Cordal's Cement Eclipses, little concrete people

Isaac Cordal makes little figures out of concrete, painting some, while leaving others their native grey color. He then places them in various places and situations around Europe, and has set them up in gallery shows. You might find them in the street, sitting on rooftops, precariously balanced on a pipe, standing up to their waists in water with a life preserver, or standing in the snow. The figures are made in clay, then a silicone mold is made in which the concrete is cast. Street Art London has an interview with Cordal. [Cordal, previously]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 24, 2013 - 6 comments

Focus on the background: animated GIFs of fighting game stages

"I have a huge collection of fighting game backgrounds as gifs. Figured you guys might appreciate it."
posted by filthy light thief on May 11, 2013 - 27 comments

British family Robinson: the short stories of three illustrators

Thomas Robinson and Eliza Heath had three sons, Thomas (1869-1950), Charles (1870-1937), and William (1872-1944), who followed in their father's (and grandfather's) footsteps as illustrators of various sorts. The most widely know was the youngest, W. Heath Robinson, whose contraptions earned him the reputation as the UK counterpart to the US artist Rube Goldberg. But the other two brothers are not to be overlooked. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 20, 2013 - 6 comments

Heinrich Berann, the father of the modern cartographic panorama

Heinrich Caesar Berann is known as the father of the modern cartographic panorama and is also credited as the most prolific panorama artist ever. His style and work could be credited with the lasting appeal of stylized panoramic maps that often feature exaggerated or distorted features as the preferred map type for ski resorts and trails (PDF) but Berann's true passion was art, as seen in these collections of his paintings and drawings found on the tribute site maintained by his grandson, Matthias Troyer. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 2, 2013 - 6 comments

Morris Scott Dollens' Dream of the Stars

Morris Scott Dollens was an active and creative science fiction fan from the earliest days of sci-fi fandom, starting with making the fanzine Science Fiction Collector via hectography at age 16. He went on to illustrate covers for various other fanzines and wrote short stories, but largely left those creative endeavors for technological hobbies and jobs related to photography and recording from the 1950s to 1960s. Following the moon landing in 1969, he began creating small-scale astronomical paintings that he mailed to sci-fi conventions all over the country, where they were part of convention art shows. He also made miniature scenes of space exploration, which he crafted as teasers for a movie, Dream of the Stars, which he sent to magazines and book publishers, but his movie was never made. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 19, 2013 - 2 comments

Evol's tiny world of apartments

Street artist Evol paints little apartment buildings on utility boxes, concrete blocks, park walls, and art installations (completed, but nothing lasts forever). More on his Flickr collection, or you can see highlights on Twisted Sifter.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 31, 2013 - 14 comments

When is a unicorn like a garden?

Alison Ann Woodward, aka Alison Wonderland, put together a little art box she called Heirloom that contains an easily disassembled little unicorn, which can then be re-assembled as a little Lewis Carrol-style garden.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 5, 2013 - 8 comments

The rotten, foaming, decaying art of Michel Blazy

Michel Blazy is a French artist who "attempts to create multi-sensorial and changing spaces and sculptures to show the uncertainties of our condition". His Post Patman show in 2007 was truly designed to be experienced by all senses, designed with "the organic, the perishable, the mould-making." Some was pretty benign, like the atomic mushroom made of 91 kilos of soy noodles and the chocolate chickens. Then there are the piles of rotting orange peel halves and the truly fragrant wall painted with mashed potatoes and beetroot purée. His newest installation was much more pleasing to the senses: Bouquet Final was a wall of foam fountains in a 13th century structure, le Collège des Bernardins. More of Blazy's work at Galerie Art Concept.
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 8, 2012 - 6 comments

Creative cards: a deck of 54 different artists

Creative cards is a deck of 54 playing cards, each card by a different artists. The cards are framed in the same way with the same typography for the suits, but the art has no over-riding theme.
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 7, 2012 - 17 comments

A Case for Reincarnation

Robert Snow, now retired, was Captain of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, who in his career was in charge of the department of the Homicide and Robbery and the department of Organized Crime. He has written numerous articles and books on police work, and considered himself a skeptic of supposedly supernatural occurrences. But on a dare, he visited a past life regression therapist, and what he experiences made him doubt his beliefs. In an hour-long session, he seemed to recall memories of a cave dweller, an altar girl in Greece, but it was his views of the life of a 19th century painter were the most vivid. In that experience, Snow recalled a number of specific memories or events, but was certain they were fabricated memories from things he had seen or heard in his life in the 20th century. In an attempt to debunk his experiences, he ended up validating his past life memories of being James Carroll Beckwith, a painter most commonly remembered not for his art, but his friendship to more renown painters like John Singer Sargent. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 24, 2012 - 186 comments

Exquisite Beast: illustrating evolution

Exquisite Beast is a tag-team tumblr, featuring an illustrated evolution that started with this little beastie, drawn by Evan Dahm (Rice Boy comics | Making Places worldbuilding blog). The next evolution was by Yuko Ota (Johnny Wander comic | forthcoming Lucky Penny comic), the other half of this illustrious duo. But their creature does not have a simple linear evolution chart, as seen in this cladogram showing the various fan-made offshoots. Some are linked from the Exquisite Beast posts, but you can find more from the Exquisite Beast tumblr tag.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 13, 2012 - 7 comments

Clouds as temporary sculptures

Berndnaut is fascinated by anything in between. Corridors and clouds, not yet there and not yet solid. What if a sculpture were to be nothing but thin air, smoke or scent?
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 12, 2012 - 20 comments

A restored apprentice's copy reveals what what the Mona Lisa looked like back in the 16th century

The Prado Museum in Madrid has what they had considered to be an inferior late-era replica of the Mona Lisa, a portrait surrounded by black. But when conservators compared infrared images of their copy with images taken in 2004 from the Leonardo's masterpiece, they found that the Prado replica closely resembled early under-drawings covered by the Mona Lisa everyone sees. Yesterday, Prado held a news conference to announce that their restoration efforts are nearly done and displayed the work in progress. The comparison is striking, showing details that might have been visible when the Mona Lisa was fresh, 500 years ago. The Guardian has more details and a high-detail portion of the apprentice's painting, believed to be by Francesco Melzi. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 2, 2012 - 21 comments

Modified Cabinet Cards, Involuntary Collaborations and Fat Cats in Art

Alex Gross converts antique cabinet card portraits into pop caricatures (larger collection). Chris McMahon creates involuntary collaborations with bland landscape paintings he picks up at yard sales, similar to John Lytle Wilson's Corrected Paintings. And then you have fat cats in art, or Great Artist's Mews.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 25, 2012 - 10 comments

Translucent tape art of Max Zorn

Max Zorn makes translucent art with a scalpel and brown packing tape (though he has worked with blue and a bit of green). A self-taught "classical" painter, he turned to back-lit street art in May 2011, and now has a growing gallery of works that are inspired by American Realism/film noir.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 4, 2012 - 17 comments

Sketchtravel: 71 artists, 15 countries, 5 years, 1 book

Back in 2006, a red sketch book started a journey around the world, traveling not through the mail, but from artist to artist. The idea came from Dice Tsutsumi and Gérald Guerlais, two animators at Blue Sky Studios. They compiled a list of 71 artists, personal friends and influential people they would like to have involved in their traveling sketch book. Dice and Gérald thought they could get it done in a year, but the book is now full, five years later. Another component of the project was to auction off the completed book and 9 reproductions, which was done in October, 2011, collecting more than 76,000 euros (100,000 US$) for the Room to Read international library-building organization. You can browse through the past travels on the Sketchtravel blog, view the participants by name or location on Sketchtravel.tv, along with video interviews and clips with 15 of the 71 artists. There are even more videos in Curio's Vimeo collection, and two informative interviews with Gérald Guerlais on NoWatch.net. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 26, 2011 - 1 comment

Henry + Glenn = 4ever

Four friends who collectively call themselves Igloo Tornado wrote a series of fictional tales of the love between Henry Rollins and Glenn Danzig, plus some jokes from their Satan worshiping neighbors, Daryl Hall and John Oates. This land of make-believe is contained in Glenn & Henry Forever. There isn't a preview in one handy location, but various interviews, reviews, and blogs have posted some of the comics (more: Henry has no shoes, Hall & Oats play D&D, a postcard from Henry to Glenn, and a page from Danzig's diary). Danzig, often the butt of internet jokes, was not thrilled. His thoughts were made into a final comic. Oh, and there's an anti-Christmas animation special/advert. And a gallery show with more artists joining the fun.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 3, 2011 - 18 comments

Before sharks swam in formaldehyde, there was Piss Christ

Andres Serrano (some NSWF images) has made controversial art for decades, with his piece Piss Christ causing controversy shortly after it was created in 1987. In 1989, the photograph initiated outrage against the National Endowment for the Arts because of "anti-Christian bigotry". Then the piece was physically attacked two times in one weekend, when it was first shown in the National Gallery of Victoria in 1997. In December 2010, the Collection Lambert museum of contemporary art in Avignon, France opened a show called "I Believe in Miracles" that includes pieces of minimal art, conceptual art and land art, and includes Piss Christ. The photograph had been shown in France before without disturbance, and had been shown without incident in Collection Lambert for four months, but around 1,000 protesters marched to the museum on Saturday, and on Sunday vandals succeeded in attacking the picture, breaking the plexiglass shield and slashing the photograph. The museum is open again, and the damaged work is still on display. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 19, 2011 - 143 comments

Dan McPharlin: Sci-Fi Surrealism (and Mini Analog Synth Models)

Dan McPharlin is an Australian artist who creates fantastic landscapes that seem more likely to come from sci-fi novels from decades past than an artist who who gives away his music for donations (YT sample). McPharlin also made a series of miniature analog synthesizers that were featured on album art for Steve Jansen's album Slope (YT sample), as well as Moog Acid by Jean-Jacques Perrey & Luke Vibert (YT sample). Currently, McPharlin's website only has an 18 page portfolio in PDF form and an email address, but his Flickr collection is a sight to behold. Even his house looks like something from a 1970s photo shoot. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 3, 2010 - 10 comments

A bit of the world, seen through x-ray specs

X-Ray art is the use of radiography to take a different look at flowers, foliage and faux landscapes, sea shells and sea life (one of a number of flash galleries), and a weird look at the world. But these folks are all millennia behind some artists from Australia, Siberia, and elsewhere. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 6, 2010 - 7 comments

Send Me (X) and I'll Make You (Y)

User-submitted inspiration for comics and art: Poorly-drawn cartoons inspired by actual spam subject lines (prev), and more refined comics from "normal" text spam text. Cartoons drawn from titles sent to one Sam Brown (pseudonym of Adam Culbert). Artists send artwork, someone else adds the text. Submit a video game title and description and get the box art made for you, courtesy of MeFi's own cheap paper [via mefi projects].
posted by filthy light thief on May 26, 2010 - 21 comments

Conan is Cimmerian, he cannot cry. I cry for him: Frank Frazetta - 1928 to 2010

Frank Frazetta, was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1928. He rose to fame first for his work with comic books in the 1940s and 50s, then for his iconic fantasy art from the 1960s on. Frazetta was the inspiration behind Zelda artist Yusuke Nakano, and Frazetta's artwork for the "Famous Funnies" were an inspiration for Star Wars. Frank Frazetta died today, at the age of 82. More history, eulogies and links inside. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 10, 2010 - 85 comments

The First Detective of the Space Age, and more Pulp Science Fiction Art

Ron Turner (1922 to December 1998) was an artist and author from the UK, with a extensive list of credits. He script, letter and created the artwork for a number of series, though that proved to be too much for the quick turn-around time required for publishing. He excelled when he could focus on the artwork, as seen with Rick Random, who first appeared as part of Super Detective Library in the 1950s. "The first detective of the space age" returned in the late 70s with 2000 AD. Ten story arcs from the 1950s and 60s were collected in quite a tome, featuring new cover art. Though Turner was well known for his pulp Sci-Fi artwork that graced comic and book covers, he only produced two covers for Super Detective Library, and neither were suitable for a Rick Random compendium.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 19, 2010 - 4 comments

Burst of Beaden

Jon Klassen is an illustrator and designer, with a blog and a lovely website full of artwork, including The Miser (3:53, 2004, made with Kyle McQueen and Dan Rodrigues), An Eye for Annai (5:27, 2005, previously, also made with Dan Rodrigues, .MOV video link), an interpretation of a Mayan folktale (available in full in Flight vol 4, previously), The Adventures of Ship, a family art project, visual development and drawings for sets and props for the movie adaptation of Coraline (a couple previous), amongst other bits and bobs. Illustration Mundo had an interview with Klassen earlier this year.
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 4, 2009 - 3 comments

Bosch as background for scenes taken from Mayan codices and transformed into modern counterparts

"Look at the surrealist moustache on the Mona Lisa. Just a silly joke? Consider where this joke can lead. I had been working with Malcolm Mc Neill for five years on an illustrated book entitled Ah Pook Is Here, and we used the same idea: Hieronymous Bosch as the background for scenes and characters taken from the Mayan codices and transformed into modern counterparts. That face in the Mayan Dresden Codex will be the barmaid in this scene, and we can use the Vulture God over here. Bosch, Michelangelo, Renoir, Monet, Picasso — steal anything in sight. You want a certain light on your scene? Lift it from Monet. You want a 1930s backdrop? Use Hopper." -- William S. Burroughs, Les Voleurs [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 2, 2009 - 29 comments

Today's yards just aren't as exciting.

The Merkel brothers are the grandsons of steam car makers and sons of an African art collector, and each have carried forward the love of collecting and an interest in cars from the previous generations. Henry Merkel is a recognized White expert, who continues to share knowledge of his family's productions and his knowledge of White steam cars has been published. Ben Merkel focused on collecting Checkered Cabs, and has has a love for peaceful rural junkyards. The youngest grandson of Walter White is Tom Merkel, and his love for collecting old cars outstrips his brothers by miles (print view). Somewhere in the Cuyama Valley, just outside of Los Padres National Forest land is his "car garden," which is also where the snowman that once adorned Santa Claus Lane now resides. His other love is 91+ year old cabin, which he indicates is "Santa Barbara's oldest cabin!" and a "Folk Art Magic Museum!" on the signs around the property, but which the Forest Service wants to tear down. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 21, 2009 - 6 comments

Visual review of art history

Are you looking to review your art history knowledge but find google too chaotic, and Prof. Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe's site is overwhelming and has a few too many dead links? Maybe wikipedia lacks the visuals you associate with an art history review, and Art cyclopedia could be a bit more straight-forward? Then The Art Browser might be the thing for you. The site combines brief descriptions of movements and artists from wikipedia, classifications from Art cyclopedia, and large images from Art.com for compact visual overview of art history. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 25, 2009 - 9 comments

Always look on the bright side of blight

"Ah, the mythical $100 home. We hear about these low-priced “opportunities” in down-on-their-luck cities like Detroit, Baltimore and Cleveland, but we never meet anyone who has taken the plunge. Understandable really, for if they were actually worth anything then they would cost real money, right? Who would do such a preposterous thing?" Amongst others, artists who have hope for the future and money to invest. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 12, 2009 - 35 comments

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