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“Living Memorial”

The winning design for the National AIDS Memorial Design Competition has been announced. Janette Kim and Chloe Town's "Living Memorial" references forest fires, and will be located in the National AIDS Memorial Grove in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. Walter Hood, a juror, called the design a “gutsy anti-landscape element that reflects anger, death—and eventual healing and renewal.”
posted by R. Mutt on Apr 26, 2005 - 13 comments

Intimate Insects

An Insect's View (via Boing Boing)
posted by Gyan on Apr 24, 2005 - 14 comments

Jack Spencer -- Photographs of the Rural South and Mexico

Aparicioñes. Somewhere along the back roads of small towns dotting the Louisiana and Mississippi and Mexico landscape is Jack Spencer, a self-taught photographer, searching for beauty. More inside.
posted by matteo on Apr 24, 2005 - 17 comments

Gregory Crewdson

The photographs of Gregory Crewdson are variably described as disturbing (nsfw,) otherworldly, filmic and sometimes just technically stunning. He readily acknowledges the influence of David Lynch and Steven Spielberg, so it's no surprise that some of Hollywood's finest are queuing up to appear in his big budget images of skewed suburbia.
posted by fire&wings on Apr 24, 2005 - 25 comments

The Amber Room

The Amber Room : [flash] Stolen by the Nazis in WWII from the Catherine Palace in St. Petersburg, Russia, the Amber Room remains one of the greatest missing treasures of Europe. The room has now been reconstructed, and the search for the original may have come to an unhappy end.
posted by dhruva on Apr 23, 2005 - 15 comments

[to do: think up weak "choppers" pun]

Reclaiming the economic usefulness of the American worker as patriarch is a lot of weight for a little pizza cutter to bear. [via]
posted by Capn on Apr 22, 2005 - 21 comments

Your Daily Art

Your Daily Art is a weblog that provides a short and sweet art history lesson on a daily basis.
posted by sciurus on Apr 22, 2005 - 12 comments

Sir Eduardo Paolozzi pop-art sculptor dies

Leading Scottish pop-art sculptor/artist Sir Eduardo Paolozzi dies aged 81. obituary, works, images, works/book review, wiki, 1971 interview
posted by peacay on Apr 22, 2005 - 3 comments

Exotic performing electronic music instruments

Dewanatron : a family of electronic instruments ‘which hazard unpredictable behaviors and self playing tendencies.’ See, for example, the Alphatron, the Dual-Primate Console, and the Courtesy Modulator. Besides his work as an instrument- and furniture-maker, the Dewanatrons’ co-creator, Brian Dewan, is a musician and singer who has collaborated with They Might Be Giants, among others. He is also a visual artist, who has created numerous filmstrips, and who was responsible for the ‘flying victrola’ design for the the Neutral Milk Hotel album ‘In The Aeroplane Over the Sea.’
posted by misteraitch on Apr 21, 2005 - 9 comments

Some of us like them fat.

Art by Showchicken Also showcases his work on Flickr and on Fotolog.
posted by quasistoic on Apr 21, 2005 - 5 comments

Ivor Cutler

Ivor Cutler - poet, musician, Glaswegian. I first enjoyed Cutler's touching, funny, and often surreal performances on the John Peel Show; and so I was delighted to find a small group of Cutler fans dedicated to spreading the Word of Ivor online. There's some audio links here, including Questionnaire, Little Black Buzzer, and Good Morning How Are You Shut Up. For Ivor fans, there's much more over at Yahoo Group's ivor-list.
posted by carter on Apr 20, 2005 - 16 comments

Sand Art for a new century?

Electronic Sand Painting (Artiste sur sable très doué) -- embedded video, from France, and Korean TV
posted by amberglow on Apr 19, 2005 - 13 comments

"He suggests living is language".

The Language of Saxophones At 55, L.A. musician and poet Kamau Daáood is finally beginning to acknowledge the possibility of his own place in local letters with his debut book of poetry, The Language of Saxophones, a 30-plus-year retrospective published by City Lights. Though he’s recorded a solo CD and read nationally and internationally, Daáood had never seen fit to collect his material in a book. Until now. “I never liked the idea of poetry sitting on a shelf somewhere, lost in all those book spines”.
posted by matteo on Apr 17, 2005 - 2 comments

There's a random painted highway

Painted beehive panels (accompanying article here) from the Museum of Apiculture [virtual tour, flash] in Radovljica, Slovenia.
posted by Wolfdog on Apr 15, 2005 - 15 comments

Google Talk

Google talk is a great way to Connect: with your angels and guides to help you make your own website. in minutes! Free day did did did did did?
posted by signal on Apr 12, 2005 - 89 comments

A gallery of walls with stuff written on

Pictures of Walls. A gallery of interesting grime, complete with joy, paranoia, politics, good advice and the stupidest graffiti ever. Only one rule for submissions: "No 'proper' graffiti or nazi crap obviously." [via Bifurcated Rivets]
posted by mediareport on Apr 11, 2005 - 18 comments

Google Montage Art Tool

SleepyGeek has a fun tool that creates montages from Google image search results.
posted by willnot on Apr 10, 2005 - 6 comments

_grau

_grau | robert seidel - KunstFilmBiennale 2004; the jury assigns the movie «_grau» by robert seidel an honorary award, because of the technological mastership which is used to show never seen phenomena in the borderland of science and aesthetics.
quicktime - cached 50Mb; cached 160Mb
posted by andrew cooke on Apr 10, 2005 - 17 comments

Another World: photography by Frederik Ödman

The dark and unsettling photography of Swedish photographer Fredrik Ödman who explores "the meeting point between logic, imagination and madness." Don't miss his nature portfolios. via The Cartoonist)
posted by madamjujujive on Apr 10, 2005 - 16 comments

Free stock image galleries

Finding free stock photographs and images
posted by daksya on Apr 10, 2005 - 14 comments

Deconstructing Cassell's Illustrated History of India

Rajkamal Kahlon makes stunning gouache paintings directly onto the pages of a 130 year old history book. Her style and technique are similar to Tom Phillips' treated novel A Humument (previously discussed here)
posted by Slack-a-gogo on Apr 9, 2005 - 10 comments

myData=myMondrian

myData=myMondrian is an interactive art interface in which the personal data provided by viewers is translated into a Piet Mondrian-like composition. Here's an example image.

Related: Rhizome.org: myData=myMondrian
posted by sjvilla79 on Apr 8, 2005 - 30 comments

The Story and Stories of Bruno Schulz

"For ordinary books are like meteors. Each of them has only one moment, a moment when it soars screaming like the phoenix, all its pages aflame. For that single moment we love them ever after, although they soon turn to ashes. With bitter resignation we sometimes wander late at night through the extinct pages that tell their stone dead messages like wooden rosary beads."
posted by felix betachat on Apr 8, 2005 - 6 comments

Because Distractions are Fun!

Better known for their modernist take on contemporary furniture design, Minneapolis furniture studio Blu Dot has just introduced a series of film shorts entitled Blu Dot Shorts. Their first short film, Seven Twenty (embedded Quicktime warning), was directed by Christopher Arcella (Flash warning). While is is not earth shattering conceptually, it is a jaunty and fun little piece of cinema.
posted by ScottUltra on Apr 6, 2005 - 15 comments

Liberty takes a bow

Liberty ship bow art of Sausalito.
posted by breezeway on Apr 6, 2005 - 6 comments

Sue de Beer

"From March 3—June 17, 2005, the Whitney Museum of American Art presents Sue de Beer: Black Sun. Black Sun, a new two-channel video installation viewed within a large-scale wooden house environment, furthers de Beer’s exploration of the construction of feminine desire and unfulfilled longing." + "Sue de Beer’s art is a mature reflection on the complex interior lives of disaffected suburban American teenagers. Her video installations, photographs, and sculptures are littered with references to the pop culture detritus central to our adolescent search for identity." + "By using the computer and constructing sets to contain the action, de Beer’s enigmatic images make any fiction appear as reality."
posted by jenleigh on Apr 6, 2005 - 7 comments

neurobion

neurobion [note: flash]
posted by crunchland on Apr 4, 2005 - 6 comments

Something else to do with a scalpel.

Peeled Photographs : British artist Richard Galpin creates unique images out of photographs by selectively stripping them with a scalpel.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Apr 4, 2005 - 16 comments

Bare NESessities

I am 8 bit is a celebration of the pixelated graphics of 80s videogames, at LA's Gallery Nineteen Eighty Eight. A hundred artists have produced paintings, sculptures and designs inspired by the two-dimensional imagery of the pre-PlayStation era. The exhibition runs from April 19 until May 20. More information, including highlights from the gallery, appear at Game Informer. It remains to be seen if the other ninety-nine artists can match the quality of Sean Clarity's exceptional reworking of the cover to NES classic Excitebike.
posted by nthdegx on Apr 3, 2005 - 18 comments

We're all living in Murakami's world.

The Murakami Method : hailed as the Japanese Andy Warhol, Takashi Murakami (previously discussed here) lives in his factory wherein he "makes art and sleeps." Murakami spans the artistic spectrum as both a proponent of Japanese otaku culture - the "geek" culture of manga and video games and the author of a PhD dissertation of Nihonga - a style of Japanese painting whose name literally translates to "Japanese painting." Further bridging the gap between "high and low culture," Murakami shows his work in museums and in the Louis Vuitton store in Tokyo.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Apr 3, 2005 - 5 comments

We're Going Where You're Going

Alternative Rapid Transit Looking for a funky way to get around town? Try Detroit's People Mover (warning, embedded earworm). For 50 cents you can travel 2.9 miles through 13 stops in 15 minutes, and see some fantastic art along the way. People movers and modified Personal Rapid Transit systems were built in various cities in the 1970s, such as Miami, Jacksonville, and at West Virginia University. The dream of true Personal Rapid Transit has not yet been achieved, and its viability and economic benefits are still up for debate, but the People Mover, at least, is still hanging on.
posted by livii on Apr 2, 2005 - 32 comments

YOU BUY IT!!!

The rights to Pokey the Penguin(archive)-the entire body of work, characters, likenesses, etc.- are for sale on eBay. Is this the end of an infrequently updated and incoherent era that spanned nearly seven years?
posted by PinkStainlessTail on Apr 1, 2005 - 21 comments

Why this is art, Jimmy.

Is this important? Take a narrated pop tour through an exhibit of Bill Barminski's art. More Barminski. (via riley dog)
posted by madamjujujive on Apr 1, 2005 - 4 comments

Look ma, no mouse!

Myron Krueger began his pioneering work in interactive art in 1969. He was one of the first to explore the aesthetics of interactivity with his "responsive environments." While preparing a talk that included a reminiscence of Krueger demoing Videoplace in the 80s, I was surprised he'd not yet merited even a stub in the Wikipedia. While that may eventually motivate me to register and start the page, for now, I will just share some links. [more inside, including videos]
posted by KS on Mar 31, 2005 - 2 comments

Larry Clark: Punk Picasso

The Cheerful Transgressive Ever since 1971, when Larry Clark published Tulsa, an austere series chronicling his meth-shooting pals in sixties Oklahoma, Clark has made it his mission to document teenagers at their most deviant, their most vulnerable, their most sexually unhinged (possibly NSFW). And now “Larry Clark” the first American retrospective of Clark’s work, currently on display at the International Center of Photography, demonstrates the richness with which he’s mined this single subject (NSFW). More inside.
posted by matteo on Mar 31, 2005 - 48 comments

Sarah Sze

Sarah Sze is an incredible artist (link is to a large image). Things fall apart (jeep cherokee), slow growth sets in and paint peels off the walls. Objects stretch out toward each other. Detail persists on a large and small scale. Here's a resume. Here are a few more images and a review. Here's another short article.
posted by nobody on Mar 30, 2005 - 25 comments

Ecrans Transparents: 'transparent' Mac screens. An homage to Magritte.

The Human Condition. A Mac-based homage to Magritte. [via]
posted by Slithy_Tove on Mar 29, 2005 - 20 comments

Joash Woodrow - Discovered artist

Joash Woodrow. An artist who's story is not unlike that of Henry Darger - a recluse who's lifetime of work has only recently been discovered. But unlike Darger, Woodrow was British, and a trained artist who studied alongside Frank Auerbach and Peter Blake. And he's still alive. Now this pensioner, who's lifetime of painting, drawing and sculpture was discovered by accident while his family were halfway through incinerating it, is being called "one of the great British artists of the 20th Century" and the price of his paintings, which call to mind Picasso, Soutine and Rouault, are skyrocketing. Aged 77, and confined to a nursing home, he is unwilling to ever paint again or discuss his art, and it is unclear if he is enjoying the benefits of his belated success.
posted by fire&wings on Mar 28, 2005 - 19 comments

Mustache!

Mustache March is a silly little idea/project where every guy at a company grows a mustache during March, they take photos, then at the end of the month a BBQ fundraiser is thrown with proceeds going to a charity. A side benefit is that the month of ridiculous facial hair leads to questions from strangers which leads to awareness of the charity. I only wish I had heard of this in February.
posted by mathowie on Mar 28, 2005 - 30 comments

One Made Over The Cuckoo's Nest

The Birdhouse Man of Berkeley builds birdhouses from scrap wood, license plates, doorknobs, and other assorted items. SFGate article.
posted by fandango_matt on Mar 28, 2005 - 5 comments

The Liner

The Liner. "The entire graduating class of Hamline University, 1925, in drawings of varying quality made semi-nightly in about one hour each." (Appears to be by our very own interrobang.)
posted by _sirmissalot_ on Mar 28, 2005 - 44 comments

Art for your phone.

Cell phone art is here. Not to be confused with art by or about cellphones, Wooster Collective is offering art for your cellphone. The project is designed to raise money for young artists, "in much the same way that a songwriter can earn money from radio play."
posted by grapefruitmoon on Mar 28, 2005 - 1 comment

Necessity had nothing to do with it

Necessity has nothing to do with it. But I'm glad someone's dreaming up these things.
posted by IndigoJones on Mar 26, 2005 - 10 comments

Zappa Inspired Art

Paintings Inspired by the Music of Frank Zappa. The cynical and humorous representations of show business appeared to be reflected in the music they were listening to at the time - the music of Frank Zappa - which led to the next series of paintings, inspired by and celebrating the music and lyrics of Zappa.
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Mar 25, 2005 - 16 comments

Over 3,400 Annoying Gimmicks

Consolidated B-24 Liberator nose art archive. Signs of the zodiac, dirty jokes, self-fulfilling prophecies, and stumpers. (Some questionable content [NSFW-ish] and site design)
posted by breezeway on Mar 25, 2005 - 7 comments

Banksy of the Hudson River

Iconic graffiti artist and cult hero, Banksy, has expanded his 'establishment' art resumé with exhibits in New York's most important art galleries.

Not very guerrilla of him.

Except that the galleries didn't know.
Naughty Banksy.
posted by NinjaPirate on Mar 24, 2005 - 41 comments

Great Leap Forward

Mo' MAO. "If you stare at a red shape for a long time, when you turn away, your retina will hold the image but you will see a green version of the same shape. In the same way, when I lived in China, I saw the positive image of Mao so many times that my mind now holds a negative image of Mao. In my art I am transferring this psychological feeling to a physical object." --Zhang Hongtu
posted by gimonca on Mar 23, 2005 - 15 comments

Artist's medium: pen and ink on hides, paper, fish skins, seal skins, tree mushrooms, plywood, ceramic tile.

The art of George Aden "Twok" Ahgupuk: Denali, oomiak, blanket toss, whale hunt, caribou, and quite a few more subjects. Don't miss the fourth-graders.
posted by breezeway on Mar 23, 2005 - 1 comment

look at this site! there's a spring all sticking out of it...

Meet Jakob Lodwick of Blumpy.org. You may be familiar with him because of sites like this or this.
Blumpy.org i s a bit of a step up, however, featuring some pretty nifty skits and a great video-journal.

He has also made a video for Cex, Baltimore's soon-to-be legendary (any day now) basement rock god, whose site also has a huge stash of excellent b-side material and another video.
not the biggest sites, so go easy on'em and be patient.
posted by es_de_bah on Mar 22, 2005 - 9 comments

After Walker Evans

After Walker Evans Alternatively, After Sherrie Levine. In 1936, Walker Evans famously photographed a family of sharecroppers. In 1979, Sherrie Levine rephotographed Evans' work. Performance artist Michael Mandiberg has reproduced Levine's work online, made them available for printing, and assembled texts and wrote plays to give the site's conceptual art concept - and Levine's work - meaning, and a punchline.
posted by livii on Mar 20, 2005 - 16 comments

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