6648 posts tagged with art.
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The Sims

Interactive simulations for science and math for teachers and interested students, from acids and bases to waves
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 14, 2015 - 4 comments

Benjamin Shine - Tulle Works

Benjamin Shine is a fashion designer and fabric artist, who has done some fantastic three dimensional works created in tulle. He talks about and demonstrates his process with an iron and thread in this video.
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 11, 2015 - 3 comments

Paper people not included.

A growing paper city, models by Charles Young. [via] [more inside]
posted by jacquilynne on Aug 11, 2015 - 6 comments

“Late” according to whom?

Welcome to Bloom — a literary site devoted to highlighting, profiling, reviewing, and interviewing authors whose first major work was published when they were age 40 or older. Bloom is also a community of artists and readers who believe that “late” is a relative term, not an absolute one, and who are interested in bringing to attention a wide variety of artistic paths — challenging any narrow, prevailing ideas about the pacing and timing of creative fruition. (via Ask)
posted by You Should See the Other Guy on Aug 10, 2015 - 10 comments

Their mission is far from over.

The Guerrilla Girls, After 3 Decades, Still Rattling Art World Cages
posted by shakespeherian on Aug 9, 2015 - 4 comments

I can give you a tour. I think you look lovely tonight. I'm a gift.

Sophia Foster-Dimino is an illustrator and cartoonist.
Foster-Dimino’s ability to articulate very specific, very familiar, rarely articulated emotional sensations is uncanny here. (...) “Have you noticed that loving someone is like pouring water into a well,” asks the frenemy. “You don’t pour water into a well you get water out of a well,” protests the protagonist, now crying. “Your lover is a deep dark delicious well & you’re nothing but a bucket,” her tormenter responds without missing a beat. “Not even a cool bucket,” she continues, “a lackluster ordinary bucket—that feels so heavy but holds so little.” To be blunt, fuuuuuuuck.
[more inside] posted by glass origami robot on Aug 7, 2015 - 13 comments

The Revolution Has Been Digitized.

Collections of activist ephemera (posters, leaflets, etc) are increasingly available online. The University of Michigan Library recently made available its digitized Joseph A. Labadie Collection of activist and political posters dating back to 1911. Selected posters from Michael Rossman's 25,000 piece collection "All Of Us Or None" are available online at the Oakland Museum of California. Lincoln Cushing's archive is up at Docs Populi: documents for the public . (via) (previously) [more inside]
posted by spamandkimchi on Aug 4, 2015 - 5 comments

Dying for their Art

in hamburg in the twenties of the past century lived a girl who was a dancer named lavinia schulz with her boyfriend, who was a dancer too, named walter holdt.
They were known as the mask dancers.
Knowledge of their astonishingly bizarre and tragic art is obscure and largely based on the rediscovery in 1986 of artifacts deposited in a Hamburg museum back in 1925.
posted by adamvasco on Aug 3, 2015 - 17 comments

The Eviction Series

Paul Madonna (previously on MeFi) and his wife have been evicted from the home and workspace in which they've lived for ten years. In response, Paul is drawing and writing All Over Coffee: The Eviction Series about his life in San Francisco right now.
posted by mattdidthat on Aug 2, 2015 - 21 comments

The Imaginary Network

The Imaginary Network rounds up under categories the various subreddits for imaginary art such as Imaginary Cityscapes, Ebony, Architecture, Ruins, History, Science, Starships, Aww, Weather, Armored Women and more.
posted by TheophileEscargot on Aug 1, 2015 - 12 comments

“There was art before him and art after him and they were not the same.”

Caravaggio [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3] [Part 4] [Part 5] [Part 6] [Part 7] Art critic Robert Hughes reflects on the work of troubled Italian artist Caravaggio.
posted by Fizz on Aug 1, 2015 - 7 comments

You... you imbecile. You bloated idiot. You stupid fat-head you.

Adam Frost and Melanie Patrick of the British Film Institute take a look at film noir and what makes a film noir-ish.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 1, 2015 - 12 comments

“Art is the lie that enables us to realize the truth.”

A History of Art in Three Colours (BBC) [Part 1] [Gold] [Part 2] [Blue] [Part 3] [White] Dr James Fox explores how, in the hands of artists, the colours gold, blue and white have stirred our emotions, changed the way we behave and even altered the course of history.
posted by Fizz on Jul 31, 2015 - 5 comments

Stars in His Pocket Like Grains of Sand

Science Fiction grandmaster Samuel R. Delaney interviewed by SF Signal, with a very long answer in part 2, and by The New Yorker where he talks about race, recent Hugo controversies being nothing new, and the past and future of science fiction.
posted by Artw on Jul 30, 2015 - 26 comments

“Writing is healing. Writing is art. Writing is learning.”

The Role of Writers in a STEM Obsessed Society
“As writers, it’s easy to think of how we matter to literature classrooms, but what the appointment of writers-in-residence in hospitals, history classrooms, foreign language learning spaces, and cooking schools reminds us is that we are relevant wherever there is humanity—which is to say, wherever humans are with their stories. Writing is healing. Writing is art. Writing is learning. As such, writing across the disciplines matters. Many models of artist residencies depend upon the retreat model, wherein the artist sequesters herself away with a small community of other artists. While these models have value, especially when considering how solitude relates to the creative process, it’s heartening to me to see more models catch on that value the place of the writer in society, rather than hidden away from it.”
posted by Fizz on Jul 30, 2015 - 44 comments

Boron is a Subdued Element...

Kaycie D. is an animator and artist who grew up on Disney films and has used that inspiration to create her own anthropomorphized illustrations of the chemical elements.
posted by Navelgazer on Jul 29, 2015 - 22 comments

Antelope? More like antelnope.

Kate Clark is an artist who uses clay to sculpt human faces for taxidermied animals. You can easily browse the gallery by starting here and using the arrow navigation in the top right.
posted by phunniemee on Jul 27, 2015 - 20 comments

Why Don't You....

The Twitter account Diana_Vreeland pays tribute to the celebrated fashion editor/social maven by coming up with colorful suggestions for how to live your life.
posted by The Whelk on Jul 23, 2015 - 16 comments

"odd and magical occurrences..."

Ever wanted to get lost in a piece of art or feel like you're inside an anime? LA-based art duo kozyndan posted an immersive "VR" experience of their 2009 Miyazaki-esque piece "Nakano In Spring". (More info on the original piece is here) [more inside]
posted by raihan_ on Jul 22, 2015 - 7 comments


Books in the films of Wes Anderson - a video essay.
posted by Artw on Jul 19, 2015 - 8 comments

Modern Square Kufic Tessellations

Islamic Geometric  — Shakil Akram Khan has taken the ancient art of Islamic calligraphic decoration to a whole new place.
posted by scruss on Jul 19, 2015 - 13 comments

"You can go wild on the wall, everything that comes to your imagination"

"The thing I find very exciting is waiting for the subway train and sometimes you'll get a glorious one that arrives decorated like a birthday cake!" Watching My Name Go By is a short 1976 BBC documentary about graffiti, artists, and graffiti artists in New York City. The film is based on Norman Mailer's 1974 essay for Esquire magazine, "The Faith of Grafitti." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 16, 2015 - 5 comments

Filmless Animation

Elliot Schultz creates mesmerizing embroidered zoetrope animations using turntables
posted by The Whelk on Jul 16, 2015 - 13 comments

Utah, get me two!

With designs inspired by Peking opera the facekini protects its wearer from jellyfish stings and sunburns.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jul 16, 2015 - 38 comments

Auriculis midae non musica gratior ulla est

Cat Pianos, Sound-Houses, and Other Imaginary Musical Instruments "One might suppose that imaginary musical instruments, deprived of physical reality, have no place in the cultural histories and heritages that a museum of musical instruments aims to illuminate and preserve. Yet in their own strange ways, imaginary musical instruments exist. What’s more, they have not merely shadowed or paralleled musical life; they have formed a vital part of it, participating in ways that show the fragility of the distinction between imaginary and real."
posted by frimble on Jul 16, 2015 - 8 comments

Because The Internet Is Made Of Cats

“Trash Cat” by Kelsey Goldych is an animated short about cats and trashcans
posted by The Whelk on Jul 14, 2015 - 15 comments

Book Graphics

The Book Graphics blog collects thousands of gorgeous covers and illustrations, with special emphases on Russian artists, fairy tales, and antiquarian books.
posted by Iridic on Jul 14, 2015 - 5 comments

There's Antimony, Arsenic, Aluminum, Selenium...

The Dynamic Periodic Table... probably the only periodic table most of you will ever need, or want, to consult (aside from Tom Lehrer's musical version). What makes this periodic table different? Take it for a spin and find out!
posted by not_on_display on Jul 12, 2015 - 13 comments

Ooh ooh a special route master!

Exhausting a Crowd is an interactive video you can annotate yourself, using footage from a London street. It was commissioned by the Victoria & Albert Museum as part of their All of This Belongs to You exhibition.
posted by like_neon on Jul 10, 2015 - 13 comments

You know, for kids

Dr. Dave Southall is an engineer who makes things, like monowheels, mini-monowheels, water bottle jetpacks, racing mowers, racing bars stools, uniboards, and other fun things.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jul 9, 2015 - 7 comments

Line up perfectly

The appeal of symmetry in art or inanimate objects (74 submissions currently and growing). Previously.
posted by growabrain on Jul 7, 2015 - 27 comments

Blaine Gibson, sculptor and Disney Legend, dead at 97

If you've ever visited a Disney theme park, you likely saw the work of Blaine Gibson. Gibson died earlier this month at the age of 97. [more inside]
posted by kimberussell on Jul 7, 2015 - 10 comments

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Monet, and La Japonaise

A program at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts inviting visitors to don a replica kimono from a Monet work has sparked protests over appropriation. Boston Art blog Big, Red & Shiny also has a write-up. [more inside]
posted by PussKillian on Jul 7, 2015 - 80 comments

Grand Theft Arthur

YouTube user Merfish has recreated some popular TV show theme intros in the video game Grand Theft Auto V [NSFW]:

  • The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
  • Full House
  • Arthur
  • Family Matters

  • posted by Room 641-A on Jul 5, 2015 - 12 comments

    This blog features a lot of drawings of kitties.

    Sometimes, a lot of kitty drawings are all a post needs to be.
    posted by Shepherd on Jul 3, 2015 - 35 comments

    Run time: 8 seconds

    Every Single Word Spoken by a Person of Color in [Film title].
    posted by You Should See the Other Guy on Jul 3, 2015 - 80 comments

    The Man Who Saw America

    Looking back with Robert Frank, the most influential photographer alive.
    posted by heyho on Jul 2, 2015 - 7 comments

    "They can strip the plankton off this cow in as little as seven days!"

    If Jurassic Park Were In Different Geological Eras
    posted by a lungful of dragon on Jul 2, 2015 - 10 comments


    George "DarkAngelØne" Redhawk is legally blind, and "likes to play with pictures” to create surreal animated gifs. His full archive contains more than 1000 images. (Some may be NSFW).
    posted by zarq on Jul 2, 2015 - 7 comments

    "The secret ingredient is imagination, fear."

    "The idea is that Hannibal is always eating people, regardless of what he’s feeding you. So I wanted it to look like something that could be lamb’s tongue but probably was a people tongue. Lambs’ tongues are so homely, and once you cook them they just look creepy and unappetizing, and what I want more than anything is for the food to look so delicious that you want to reach into the screen and try it, even though you know it’s people. It’s the personification of Hannibal. He’s the Devil. Why do you like him? Why do you want to get to know him? Why do you want to eat these tongues? They’re people!"
    How Hannibal's food stylist, Janice Poon, creates hypothetical human meat
    posted by Room 641-A on Jun 30, 2015 - 92 comments

    Demons For Dummies Ca. 1775

    "A selection of pages from an 18th-century demonology book comprised of more than 30 exquisite watercolours showing various demon figures, as well as magic and cabbalistic signs. The full Latin title of Compendium rarissimum totius Artis Magicae sistematisatae per celeberrimos Artis hujus Magistros, roughly translates to “A rare summary of the entire Magical Art by the most famous Masters of this Art”. With a title page adorned with skeletons and the warning of Noli me tangere (Do not touch me), one quickly gets a sense of the dark oddities lurking inside its pages." - The Public Domain Review presents illustrations from a 18th century guide to demons and demonology (NSFW illustrated nudity, snakes on bits.)
    posted by The Whelk on Jun 30, 2015 - 29 comments

    Pixel Dailies

    @Pixel_Dailies gives you a theme or subject every day for you to draw. They retweet and blog their favorites each day. The art club just had its first birthday.
    posted by curious nu on Jun 29, 2015 - 2 comments

    Steer the hallucinations of a neural net

    Watch a Large Scale Deep neural net hallucinate while onlookers supply topics in a chat room. Almost magically, after a few seconds the psychedelic representations of those suggestions begin creeping out of the woodwork into which you infinitely zoom. Jonas Degrave writes about how the thing came to be on his blog. Previously.
    posted by smcameron on Jun 28, 2015 - 24 comments

    Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Start Loving Yoko Ono

    I have always been drawn to the women who can arouse this kind of vitriol. The kind of hate that seems too big and billowing to be directed at just one woman, the kind that seems like a person or an entire society is vomiting out all its misogyny onto one convenient scapegoat. At some point — after successive Joan of Arc and Courtney Love phases — I started to see this position of feminine abjectness as a kind of superpower. A position from which a woman could offend far more deeply than a man.
    Lindsay Zoladz: Yoko Ono and the Myth That Deserves to Die.
    posted by MartinWisse on Jun 24, 2015 - 97 comments

    the essential work of art is to magnify the ordinary

    As with anything in this world, excess is excess, but inadequate is inadequate. A writer must know when the weight of the words used to describe a scene is bearing down on the scene itself. A writer should develop the measuring tape to know when to describe characters' thoughts in long sentences and when not to. But a writer, above all, should aim to achieve artistry with language which, like the painter, is the only canvas we have. Writers should realize that the novels that are remembered, that become monuments, would in fact be those which err on the side of audacious prose, that occasionally allow excess rather than those which package a story — no matter how affecting — in inadequate prose.
    Chigozie Obioma for The Millions: The Audacity of Prose.
    posted by divined by radio on Jun 23, 2015 - 9 comments

    Full cast and crew

    David Lebovitz visits the Le Creuset factory in Fresnoy-le-Grand, France.
    posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 22, 2015 - 45 comments

    Ceci n'est pas un Parkplatz

    Erwin Wurm just received a parking ticket in the city of Karlsruhe. Nothing to write home about, except for the fact that the offending object was one of his artworks. Austrian artist Erwin Wurm has become famous for bending, inflating and twisting cars, trucks and camper-vans in the name of art.
    posted by Too-Ticky on Jun 22, 2015 - 6 comments

    Mechs, livestock and uhlans

    Jakub Rozalski is a Polish illustrator whose artwork mixes retrofuturism and the Polish countryside of the 1920s (with special appearances of Wojtek the army bear), in a style reminiscent of the Kossak dynasty of realist painters, but with mechs. Note that during WW1 the Russians did experiment with the Lebedenko (aka Tsar Tank), a 12-m high, 60-ton war machine that was barely less fantastic than those painted by Rozalski.
    posted by elgilito on Jun 19, 2015 - 15 comments

    I didn't think it was physically possible, but this both sucks and blows

    French magician and juggler Antoine Terrieux created a series of remarkably self-sustaining sculptures using different arrangements of hair dryers, and has also incorporated them in funny ways in his stage performance. He also plays with a diabolo in ways that seem to defy gravity. [via]
    posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 19, 2015 - 19 comments

    Completely enclosed in the hollow of his hand

    There is popular music and popular cinema and there is actually popular sculpture. Much of it is what we would usually call ornaments. Some of it is minis — i.e., miniatures. Minis are sculpture for the masses in the same way as pop is music for the masses. (If you are trying to explain this to someone suspicious with an arts degree you can call them Kleinplastik, which means almost the same thing but is German and therefore a valid intellectual construct.)
    For HiLoBrow Patrick Stuart starts a new, ten part series analysing the mini figures and models used in wargames as art. In the first he looks at the constraints that go into designing and manufacturing minis. (Originally published at his own blog.)
    posted by MartinWisse on Jun 17, 2015 - 26 comments

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