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350-year-old photographs

Tim Jenison had a theory that Joseph Vermeer had made used of particular lens technology to make his paintings almost photo-realistic. To test this, he recreated the setting of The Music Lesson from scratch, harpsichord and all, and even recreated the theorised lenses using 17th century tools. For someone who doesn't know how to paint, he sure did a good job.
posted by divabat on Jun 15, 2014 - 86 comments

Give it 30 years and the overstuffed chair becomes hip and high brow...

Spread from a 1949 issue of LIFE magazine charts what is low-brow, high-brow and inbetween
posted by The Whelk on Jun 14, 2014 - 185 comments

“Is it about a bicycle?”

Flann O'Brien: The Lives of Brian [VIMEO]: A documentary about Flann O'Brien aka Brian O'Nolan. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jun 13, 2014 - 13 comments

Inside and Out

Cao Hui is a Chinese artist who seeks the "inner reaches of things" like furniture, classical sculpture, and clothing. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 12, 2014 - 6 comments

Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe

Crawling the lost tracks of Latin America. Artists Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene, a.k.a. "Los Ferronautas," converted a car into a retro-futuristic rail vehicle they dubbed SEFT-1 (Sonda de Exploración Ferroviaria Tripulada, "Manned Railway Exploration Probe") to explore the abandoned passenger railways of Mexico and Ecuador.
posted by gottabefunky on Jun 12, 2014 - 7 comments

"On a cloud I saw a child, and he laughing said to me…"

The book is considered the rarest of Sendak’s published work — so rare that it’s practically impossible for even art historians to get their eyes on a copy for scholarly work. To commemorate the 86th birthday of Maurice Sendak (previously), Maria Popova (previously) has published scans of illustrations Sendak did for an ultra-ultra-rare edition of William Blake's Songs of Innocence.
posted by Cash4Lead on Jun 10, 2014 - 13 comments

Use Photography as a Weapon

The Extraordinary Anti-Nazi Photomontages of John Heartfield, a dadist who collaborated with George Grosz and had a lifelong friend in Brecht.
This is a tribute website from his grandson.
Heartfield pioneered photomontage and inspired Siouxsie and the Banshees Metal Postcard.
Essay from the Getty and a little more.
(Previously ''The Man who Pissed off Hitler.'' but fpp links are dead.)
posted by adamvasco on Jun 9, 2014 - 10 comments

Envisioning the American Dream

Envisioning the American Dream is "a visual remix of the American Dream as pictured in Mid-Century media" that discusses topics such as Man and Machines, Vintage Advice for Cheaters, and Suburbia for Sale, amongst many others.
posted by gemutlichkeit on Jun 9, 2014 - 5 comments

“Hometown Memories I: Walking to Church on a Rain Sunday Evening.”

In the weeks following Kinkade’s death , his estate tried to protect his brand: the gag order on his mistress and a statement attributing his death to natural causes were among the efforts they made to prevent the public from learning about the seedier side of Kinkade’s life. They didn’t work—but it didn’t matter. The Thomas Kinkade Release Calendar
posted by R. Mutt on Jun 9, 2014 - 148 comments

Shipwrecked sailors wandering around in a state of semi-delirium.

Fractal art has been with us for some time, but to my knowledge there are only two people attempting any serious art criticism of the genre. Both of them live at Orbit Trap, a blog about fractal art, where the authors trace the line that separates "the art folks from the science fair enthusiasts" and occasionally rail against the ubiquity of pretty spirals. Fuh-fuh-fuh ... fractals is Tim Hodkinson's latest round-up of things that caught his eye. Includes a pleasantly seasick video journey through a 3D fractal world plus some magnificent still works and a few of Tim's opinions.
posted by valetta on Jun 9, 2014 - 19 comments

Action movies are just musicals with knuckles.

Don JeVore: You Hate Musicals Because You Are Dead Inside.
posted by The Whelk on Jun 8, 2014 - 210 comments

Alain Resnais, 1922-2014

Alain Resnais, the French filmmaker who helped introduce literary modernism to the movies and became an international art-house star with nonlinear narrative films like “Hiroshima Mon Amour” and “Last Year at Marienbad,” died on [March 1] in Paris. He was 91. NYTimes Obit [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Jun 6, 2014 - 28 comments

A Dutch seascape and its lost Leviathan

"Earlier this year a conservator at the Hamilton Kerr Institute made a surprising discovery while working on a 17th-century painting owned by the Fitzwilliam Museum. As Shan Kuang cleaned the surface, she revealed the beached whale that had been the intended focus of the composition."
posted by brundlefly on Jun 5, 2014 - 37 comments

Pat Perry

Pat Perry's surreal sketchbook and surreal art [more inside]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Jun 5, 2014 - 7 comments

J.C. Leyendecker

Before Rockwell, a Gay Artist Defined the Perfect American Male. [more inside]
posted by bibliogrrl on Jun 5, 2014 - 42 comments

"You Crazy Bastards. What Have You Done? Now I Have To Rebuild!"

In 2003, Andy "waxpancake" Baio created Upcoming, "a collaborative event calendar focused on interesting arts and tech events around the world, curated by its community. It surfaced weird and wonderful events that usually fell under the radar of traditional event listings from newspapers and local weeklies." In 2005, it was acquired by Yahoo!, who killed the site last April with little warning, and no way to back up events. Fortunately, the complete site was saved by the Internet Archive. But Upcoming isn't dead yet! Two months ago, Yahoo! offered to sell the domain back to Baio. And now, with a fully-funded kickstarter, he's planning on "rebuilding it for the modern era using tools and platforms that weren't available when it was first designed." Welcome to the brilliant life, stupid death, and improbable return of Upcoming.org. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 3, 2014 - 22 comments

all that is gold does not glitter

Quasi-medieval illustrations from a Russian edition of Lord of the Rings (part 2, part 3, part 4.)
posted by michaelh on Jun 2, 2014 - 36 comments

Siva in Motion

Multimedia artist Shigeyuki Kihara created Siva in Motion (SLYT), an entrancing exploration of taualuga, a Samoan type of dance. [more inside]
posted by Deoridhe on Jun 1, 2014 - 2 comments

SAN値さがるぞぉぉぉぉー!

Yamada Gouki (山田剛毅), aka goking, has been illustrating creatures from the Cthulhu Mythos and similar horrors in an ukiyo-e style: Cyaegha, Igolnaku, The Thing That Plays with Fate, Cthonian, Byakhee, and would like to wish you a very Merry Fishmas from Innsmouth. You can find more illustrations on his Twitter or his blog, 2D6. [more inside]
posted by 23 on May 29, 2014 - 11 comments

Doodal

Doodal is a freehand fractal doodling program that runs in your browser.
posted by narain on May 28, 2014 - 12 comments

Chinese Lianhuanhua: A Century of Pirated Movies

Before bootleg DVDs, western movies were adapted into Lianhuanhua: linked picture books that could be bought or rented. While many stories were told, and many movies were "pirated" in this way, one of particular interest is Star Wars. [more inside]
posted by nubs on May 27, 2014 - 26 comments

Infused with the personality of the neighborhood

Designer Adam Chang rode New York's trains for 20 hours, using 9 swipes to visit 118 stations, to bring you the NY Train Project.
posted by Joe in Australia on May 27, 2014 - 11 comments

Glasgow School of Art destroyed

The Glasgow School of Art, designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and recently voted Britain's favorite building of the past 175 years, has been devastated by fire. While the stone exterior of Mackintosh's greatest architectural masterpiece may survive, Mackintosh's interiors are presumed lost.
posted by scody on May 23, 2014 - 70 comments

"Everyone On Wall Street Is A Dick."

The two-day Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) graduate showcase at NYU was a madhouse, with some 100 projects on view, ranging from groundbreaking innovations to timely trinkets. But the most talked about project by far was Peiqi Su's "Penis Wall" - an array of 81 robotic phalli that rise and fall in response to the stock market. Official Vimeo account for the project - Thesis presentation - in depth How-it-was-made production blog. (Slightly NSFW if your work doesn't like white, plastic, abstract dicks.)
posted by The Whelk on May 23, 2014 - 14 comments

Illustration Is Story-Telling

Longtime veteran courtroom sketch artist Gary Myrick gives us a look inside his profession.
posted by gman on May 22, 2014 - 5 comments

No quarters given

Arcade Story - the co-founder of innovative OS X and iOS software outfit Panic reminisces about learning how to beat Dragon's Lair in the pre-Internet age, but that's not the fun part...
posted by Blazecock Pileon on May 21, 2014 - 17 comments

Your random photograph as a movie poster

Anonymous Redditor ’Your Post As A Movie“ takes photo comments that members post, and Photoshops them into spot-on fake movie posters. Here's his/her prolific output from the last 6 months. (the first link is the original photo, the second one, is the poster, which is often created right after the post goes up) [more inside]
posted by growabrain on May 21, 2014 - 19 comments

If you have no nearby meadow in which to take a dandelion break...

Endlessly growing flower.
posted by Wolfdog on May 21, 2014 - 20 comments

Lights, paper, action!

Davy and Kristin McGuire do some amazing things with cut paper, light and animation that turn these beautifully cut paper dioramas into haunting installations - including an homage to Hitchcock. Via Colossal.
posted by Athanassiel on May 20, 2014 - 7 comments

Thug: A Life of Caravaggio in Sixty-Nine Paragraphs

Thug: A Life of Caravaggio in Sixty-Nine Paragraphs
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on May 20, 2014 - 14 comments

Ambient art

Line Segments Space by Kimchi and Chips
posted by Blazecock Pileon on May 19, 2014 - 2 comments

MATTES - Like you've never seen them before!

Huge collection of (and commentary on) matte art from classic films that has been rescanned for HD releases. Much more on the process of creating and filming this type of setup at last month's post. (previously)
posted by BlackLeotardFront on May 19, 2014 - 13 comments

Madonna of the sailors

Little remembered Suzy Solidor was frequently an artists model.
Some of the images are NSFW
Starting in the early 1920´s she was painted by Foujita possibly after their shared holiday in Deauville and then in 1927 by the fauvist Kees von Dongen.
In 1930 she opened her nightclub La Vie Parisienne the same year modelling in a BSDM take for Man Ray among others.
In 1933 her lover Tamara Lempicka ( previously ) painted her.
Like her friend Jean Cocteau (pictured 1938) she collaboratored during the occupation by keeping her club open and in 1940 Picabia painted her and she became known as the Madonna of the Sailors.
Here is a recording of her version of Lily Marlene and some more
She moved to Cagnes sur Mer after the war and modelled up to her death in 1983 (Marie-Pascale Deleun)
She left her portraits to the Chateau Grimaldi museum.
posted by adamvasco on May 18, 2014 - 14 comments

Gag me with a spoon

Poolside Radio is a bizarre slice of the 1980s in a browser. Strange old clips of 80s movies combined with 80s synth music and a lovely pastel palette make for a good time.
posted by mathowie on May 16, 2014 - 28 comments

Robbing the Banksy

Was the pilfered painting worth it? Detroit's 555 Gallery saved a stencil from scrappers, but now wants to sell it.
posted by klangklangston on May 15, 2014 - 22 comments

(Walt) said we should have gone ahead and made it anyway

In the mid-1940s, surrealist artist Salvador Dali began collaborating with Walt Disney on a short film. The idea was fully storyboarded and an 18 second test animation was completed by Disney animator John Hench. Soon after, the idea was shelved due to a changing of focus with Disney Feature Animation. Almost 60 years later, Walt's nephew Roy E. Disney (with consultation from the now 95-year old Hench) spearheaded an effort to finish the film. In 2003, the finished product, "Destino", premiered. [more inside]
posted by inturnaround on May 15, 2014 - 11 comments

New words: Big. Vagina. Scared.

Peter sees the painting. "I could paint that", says Peter. "But you didn't", says Mummy. (mildly NSFW). In We go to the gallery, by British artist Miriam Elia, the titular characters of the Peter and Jane Keyword Readers of the 1960s visit a museum of contemporary art. Penguin, the publisher of the original books, is not amused, but the feathered creature may be actually dead in the water.
posted by elgilito on May 14, 2014 - 9 comments

HR Giger has died.

Swiss media report that HR Giger, famous for his dark and iconic Alien design, has died. He leaves behind a large body of work, much of it displayed in his own museum.
posted by Zarkonnen on May 13, 2014 - 147 comments

Is this the record for longest time making a movie?

Richard Linklater's Boyhood casts the same group of actors to shoot a movie over a 12-year period (2002-2014) portraying the coming-of-age of Mason, played by Ellar Coltrane, who speaks about the experience here.
posted by divabat on May 11, 2014 - 50 comments

Anonymous artist duo with a penchant for chalk dust

Two seniors at the Columbus College of Art and Design have been sneaking into classrooms one night per week and creating incredible chalkboard art featuring famous quotations. Going by the moniker Dangerdust, they can be found on Twitter, Instagram, tumblr, and behance.
posted by gnidan on May 10, 2014 - 14 comments

Why don't you take a picture, it'll last longer!

Photobooth Innards: the inner workings of a vintage black and white photobooth in real time. Via photobooth.net, the most comprehensive photobooth resource on the internet (previously)
posted by Blazecock Pileon on May 8, 2014 - 7 comments

Fuck Yeah 1692's Version Of Pantone!

"In over 700 pages of handwritten Dutch, the author, who identifies himself as A. Boogert, describes how to make watercolour paints. He explains how to mix the colours and how to change their tone by adding “one, two or three portions of water”. To illustrate his point he fills each facing page with various shades of the colour in question. To top it he made an index of all the colours he described, which in itself is a feast to look at. In the 17th century, an age known as the Golden Age of Dutch Painting, this manual would have hit the right spot. It makes sense, then, that the author explains in the introduction that he wrote the book for educational purposes. Remarkably, because the manual is written by hand and therefore literally one of a kind, it did not get the “reach” among painters - or attention among modern art historians - it deserves." Erik Kwakkel, a medieval book historian in the Netherlands, spotted scans of the book in a French scholarly database and posted it to his blog a few days ago. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on May 7, 2014 - 10 comments

Acrylic on Magazine

Ofelia Cleaning. Ramiro Gomez (Facebook page) (Gallery page) is an artist whose paintings at the blog Happy Hills "document[] the predominantly Hispanic workforce who work tirelessly behind the scenes to maintain the beautiful imagery of these affluent areas." He also places painted cut-outs of workers on the lawns in pricey neighborhoods. [more inside]
posted by crush-onastick on May 7, 2014 - 6 comments

Christies is hip, I mean cool, no?

If I Live I'll See You Tuesday... Founded in 1766, the auction house Christie's is hip, I mean cool, no? Maybe not; Christie’s Makes Gritty, Underbelly-Esque Skateboarding Video to Preview Forthcoming Gritty, Underbelly-Esque Auction
posted by R. Mutt on May 7, 2014 - 17 comments

Ink Punching

Parisian tattoo artist Gue T Deep made a slow motion video of his hand at work.
posted by gman on May 7, 2014 - 12 comments

Christian Zander's abstract generative art

Christian Zander may have a commercial design background, he has a significant amount of work in a more abstract, generative style, as seen in his House and Bike blog posts, and strewn among his work portfolio. He has also worked with animations, both live (Kiss Kiss Kiss - "Ponte 25") and recorded (Kenton Slash Demon - "Ore" / I Got You On Tape - "Run From The Rain").
posted by filthy light thief on May 6, 2014 - 2 comments

fiction in the form of art gallery plaques

"Card Tricks by James Hannaham recommended by Jennifer Egan"
"By invoking the existence of artworks involving the gallery space, the people inside it, and the larger world (quite literally), Hannaham performs an ingenious reversal: the subject illuminated by the plaques ends up being us, the reader-viewers. And our experience of reading and viewing them—in what order we choose, in what state we’re in that day or night, in what company, in what mood, in what weather, is the narrative."
posted by davidstandaford on May 5, 2014 - 3 comments

Artist's Notebook: Ramsey Nasser

"Arabic programming languages with the honest goal of bringing coding to a non-Latin culture have been attempted in the past, but have failed without exception. What makes my piece قلب different is that its primary purpose was to illustrate how impossible coding in anything but English has become."
posted by invitapriore on May 5, 2014 - 46 comments

Hold me tight

Valley of Dolls
Eleven years ago, Ayano Tsukimi returned to her home in Nagoro. Confronted with constant departures, she has populated the village with dolls, each representing a former villager. Around 350 of the giant dolls now reside in and around Nagoro, replacing those that died or abandoned the village years ago.

In a recent documentary titled The Valley Of Dolls, Fritz Schumann explores Tsukimi's world, highlighting the time and artistry that goes into making the figures, and explaining her motivations. In it we're shown around a local school, once filled with children and teachers, that now houses dozens of dolls, sitting statically, waiting for class to begin.

posted by infini on May 3, 2014 - 13 comments

Michal Krasnopolski

Simple grid-based movie posters
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 on May 3, 2014 - 44 comments

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