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Tom and Jerry

No, not THAT Tom and Jerry. [more inside]
posted by HuronBob on Sep 2, 2013 - 13 comments

 

artists in their own words

Painters on Painting - 1972 documentary on the New York Art Scene 1940-1970, directed by Emile de Antonio. It spans American art movements from abstract expressionism to pop art via conversations with artists in their studios. Including Willem de Kooning, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Helen Frankenthaler, Frank Stella, Hans Hofmann, Robert Motherwell and others. (via Bibliokept) [more inside]
posted by madamjujujive on Sep 2, 2013 - 8 comments

Nate's Adventures

Nate's Adventures. "These are photographs of my son, pictured in a world of fantasy and imagination. A world that children occupy a good deal of the time. They are my interpretation of his world." Photography by David Niles. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Sep 1, 2013 - 6 comments

From Folklore to Exotica: Yma Sumac and the Performance of Inca Identity

When the Andean exotica singer Yma Sumac became famous in the United States for her supposed Inca heritage and five-octave voice, her fellow Peruvians called her a sellout. UC Davis professor Zoila Mendoza, however, knew Yma Sumac as her mother’s childhood friend.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 31, 2013 - 18 comments

The original golden age of fantasy role playing games.

Old School FRP is a tumblr blog with a ton of illustrations and art from the golden age of Dungeons and Dragons and games that were totally not Dungeons and Dragons.
posted by Pope Guilty on Aug 31, 2013 - 33 comments

En Puntas

EN PUNTAS (extracts). "A ballerina, whose pointe shoes are extended by a set of sharp kitchen knives, dances and twirls insistently until reaching exhaustion, fighting to maintain balance on the lid of a grand piano set on a stage..." Video installation by artist Javier Pérez, featuring ballerina Amélie Ségarra.
posted by homunculus on Aug 30, 2013 - 25 comments

"Do you have any heads for me today?"

Collaborating with a 4-year Old -- Mother and daughter share a sketchbook, make magic.
posted by neroli on Aug 30, 2013 - 24 comments

ANSI to infinity and beyond!

Text-art collective Blocktronics released it's 3rd pack last night called "Space Invaders" with over 100 pieces of text-based ANSI/ASCII art
posted by livejamie on Aug 29, 2013 - 10 comments

Energy crisis, industrial pollution, Kodachromes and more...

From The Atlantic, a series of photography that documents America in the 1970s: the Pacific Northwest | New York City | the Southwest | Chicago's African-American community | Texas [more inside]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 29, 2013 - 20 comments

Hi, there. I want to talk to you about ducts. The ones on your turtle.

ライナーノーツ (translation: "liner notes") is a short video clip that makes sense if you imagine a fan of Terry Gilliam was inspired by the animated scenes from Monty Python, but set them in the grim future of Brazil, with the added twist that the dark future is built in/around giant giraffes, turtles, whales, and bison. From the Japanese artist Yuta Ikehara, whose website and additional work is available here (Google auto-translation; via Dark Roasted Blend's post on contemporary Japanese 2D artists)
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 29, 2013 - 1 comment

Superposition

Covariance is a particle detector-inspired art installation in the London Canal Museum's ice wells. It is part of the Superposition: physicists and artists in conversation project.
posted by homunculus on Aug 28, 2013 - 3 comments

"...attitudes and budgets were much more in favor of science..."

Simon Stålenhag paints digital alternate histories. More here. Previously.
posted by Acey on Aug 28, 2013 - 6 comments

Maybe we can make him another ear...

You know how Van Gogh liked to really slather paint on and his paintings were rather 3D but you couldn't touch them but really wanted to? Now you can. Fujifilm has created a process called Reliefography, which creates 3D-printed versions of paintings called Relievos. They are exclusive to the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam for three years, but will move on to other instituions after that time. They can only produce three copies a day, but "the torn labels and hand written notes on the back of a canvas are perfectly recreated". [more inside]
posted by sio42 on Aug 28, 2013 - 29 comments

Buffalo School Board stages theater of the absurd

Buffalo News theater critic reviews a recent school board meeting.
posted by latkes on Aug 26, 2013 - 14 comments

Balance from Within

Balance from Within is a robotic, self-balancing sofa by artist Jacob Tonski. (via @golan)
posted by gwint on Aug 25, 2013 - 16 comments

Knit the planet!

In June 2013, the Allegheny County Council approved the yarn bombing of the Andy Warhol Bridge in Pittsburgh, in celebration of Warhol's 85th birthday [previously mentioned on MeFi]. On 11 August, 1800 volunteers blanketed (heh) the bridge in 3000 feet of hand-knitted panels. More photos and behind the scenes. [more inside]
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts on Aug 25, 2013 - 27 comments

Going Underground

Stanley Kubrick's Amazing Old Photos Of The NYC Subway System
posted by Artw on Aug 23, 2013 - 32 comments

Photos of people and places in bordertowns

"Borders feel like places of movement. A transition point from one place to another. You don't think of people making a home there. But they do."-A description of Photographer Lara Shipley's project, Coming, Going and Staying
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 23, 2013 - 4 comments

Nasty Pieces of Work

Tim Noble & Sue Webster make art (mildly NSFW), including an ongoing series of abstract sculpture which, when spot-lit, throw very human shadows. [more inside]
posted by griphus on Aug 22, 2013 - 15 comments

Devices of delight and wonder

Unlikely but not impossible images.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 21, 2013 - 28 comments

“This is like the weighing of souls.”

Christie's Auction House is set to appraise The Detroit Institute of Art's holdings as part an accounting of Detroit's assets. According to Art Market Monitor, the danger of the appraisal now taking place ... is that it will reveal a much greater value than the $2.5bn bandied about recently. Todd Levin, a Detroit-born art adviser and director of the Levin Art Group in New York, said the value of the museum’s entire 60,000-piece collection would have to be significantly higher — “at least in the low to mid-11 figures, In other words, at least $10 billion to $20 billion. (Previously)
posted by R. Mutt on Aug 20, 2013 - 61 comments

Unique sculptures of Pierre Matter

Unique Pieces -- Sculpture materials: metal (copper, bronze, brass, steel, stainless steel), wood. Assembly: welding, rivets, screws. Metal shapping: hammering, rolling, cold rolling.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 18, 2013 - 7 comments

Open Content, An Idea Whose Time Has Come

This week the Getty Museum announced that it is making 4600 digital images of public domain materials in its collections freely available, with plans to release more as their status is confirmed. You can browse the collection here, or take a look at some selected highlights. Want more free images? Try these repositories.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Aug 17, 2013 - 30 comments

Drawing Inspiration

A look inside the cartoonist's sketchbook - Anders Nilsen, Jeffrey Brown, Kate Beaton, Rutu Modan, Chris Ware
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 17, 2013 - 6 comments

The intersection of parasitism and philosophy

The Thoreau Poison - Caleb Crain of The New Yorker takes a closer look at the ideas explored in Upstream Color (spoilers)
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 16, 2013 - 19 comments

America's Oldest Known Petroglyphs

Ancient North Americans gouged elaborate rock art into a heap of big boulders northeast of Reno, Nev., more than 10,000 years ago and perhaps 15,000 years ago. That makes the carvings the oldest known petroglyphs on the continent, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.
posted by 445supermag on Aug 16, 2013 - 9 comments

Tasty Rorschach

Esther Lobo is a photographer who has recently started playing with food.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 16, 2013 - 5 comments

Nighthawks in the round

In conjunction with the Whitney Museum of American Art's exhibit Hopper Drawing [NYT review], which the museum calls "the first major museum exhibition to focus on the drawings and creative process of Edward Hopper," the museum has constructed a temporary life-size window installation recreating Nighthawks in the Flatiron Building's Sprint-sponsored Prow Artspace. The Flatiron is believed to be one of the real-life inspirations for the iconic diner by Carter Foster, curator of drawing for the Whitney and organizer of the Hopper exhibition. [previously]
posted by orthicon halo on Aug 16, 2013 - 21 comments

Inverse Perspective

Syd Mead's Stanford Torus Illustrations for National Geographic got him the job, 40 years later, of designing Elysium for Neill Blomkamp. Mead calls the unique visual effect of these interior drawings, in which the horizon wraps up and over the viewpoint, 'inverse perspective'. This effect, and others like it, have been explored in the concept art for large, rotating, space habitats at least since the early 1960s. [more inside]
posted by sevensixfive on Aug 16, 2013 - 24 comments

Don't twitch

John Franzen: Each line, one breath
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 15, 2013 - 15 comments

The real Necronomicon?

Guillermo del Toro's Sketchbook
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Aug 14, 2013 - 26 comments

The Art of John Lytle Wilson

Occasionally, an artist will paint something, but neglect to include monkeys and/or robots. When he can, John Lytle Wilson fixes that. In addition to correcting the paintings of others, Mr. Wilson also paints original pieces. Most of which include monkeys and/or robots. And unicorns. There are some unicorns in there too.
posted by Cookiebastard on Aug 14, 2013 - 13 comments

You know what Jack Burton says at a time like this?

Comic artist Chris Weston unilaterally declares it Kurt Russell week and produces a triptych of posters for Escape from New York, The Thing and Big Trouble in little China. These are just the roughs.
posted by Artw on Aug 13, 2013 - 61 comments

Marvelous photographs of 19th Century London street life

The street photographer I share with you this week was a man born in Great Britain an entire century before Winogrand and Friedlander. His name was John Thomson (1837-1921) and it is known that he traveled the Far East taking photographs during much of the period between 1860-1879. When he returned to London, he began taking documentary photographs of everyday people on the streets of London. Via madamjujujive
posted by nickyskye on Aug 13, 2013 - 18 comments

Something split and new

Njideka Akunyili's acrylic painting over photocopies combines figurative, domestic scenes with the cacophony of globalism and traditional decorative motifs.
posted by klangklangston on Aug 12, 2013 - 5 comments

These are the riches of the poor

The Smiths Poster Exhibition is at BarcelonaNQ in Manchester until August 31, 2013. It features art from the personal collection of obsessive Smiths fan Marc Capella. The Guardian has a slideshow of some of the more famous pieces.
posted by mrgrimm on Aug 12, 2013 - 10 comments

Pretty In Pink

While we've discussed it before, the link was removed but YouTube's new content guidelines have allowed it to be re-uploaded. In 2001, photographer and filmmaker David LaChapelle directed a video to be shown before Heatherette's first runway show and MAC cosmetics in-store video. Starring Amanda Lepore, the 6 minute video is a bizarre gunshot of pink lipstick, gay cowboys, 80s pop music, and constant full frontal nudity. YouTube (sign-in required) Vimeo. (NSFW)
posted by The Whelk on Aug 11, 2013 - 62 comments

Nothing I do is a true or absolute reality: Herbert Baglione's urban art

"1000 Shadows" is a series of works by the urban/street artist Herbert Baglione, which consists of spirits escaping from urban settings. His latest creations in this series are set in the empty rooms of an old abandoned psychiatric hospital in the city of Parma in Italy, which further increases the fascinating and frightening ambiance of his creations. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 9, 2013 - 3 comments

Time is a Dimension

"This series of images are mostly landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes, and they are a single composite made from sequences that span 2-4 hours ... The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time..."
posted by griphus on Aug 9, 2013 - 9 comments

Living With Monsters

BAKELANASLAND! "Two years ago I set out on a journey inside my head to document the local fauna there. These photographs are what I've come back with so far, thirty three life forms that comprise the core essence of a much larger family that keeps growing everyday." Illustrations by Juan Carlos Paz. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Aug 7, 2013 - 6 comments

Long live the granny square

Guy Whitby, an Aussie artist also known as WorkByKnight (WBK), creates mixed media pixelated art, such as portraits using keyboard keys, and portraits and famous works of art using crochet granny squares.
posted by donajo on Aug 7, 2013 - 6 comments

Myth is the facts of the mind made manifest in a fiction of matter.

Maya Deren has been called The High Priestess of Experimental Cinema.
Probably her greatest work was Meshes of the Afternoon a 13min. silent movie made in 1943.
Here is a review and some stills and clips from her work.
The music is by Teiji Ito who later became her third husband. (See also).
Maya Deren was one of the influences on David Lynch.
posted by adamvasco on Aug 6, 2013 - 13 comments

You guys watch Joe Don Baker movies?

A six-minute documentary snippet discusses Kubrick's camera modifications for special, low-light f/0.7 Zeiss lenses used to film candlelit scenes in Barry Lyndon, now available to rent by aspiring filmmakers.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 5, 2013 - 34 comments

PORCELAINia

PORCELAINia. A short documentary about artist and scientist Bobby Jaber. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Aug 4, 2013 - 5 comments

Trying to understand Glenn Gould

Of the many available documentaries about the pianist Glenn Gould, "Genius within - The inner life of Glenn Gould" is one of the more thoughtful ones. [more inside]
posted by Namlit on Aug 3, 2013 - 16 comments

No other business offers a man his daily bread upon such joyful terms.

It is doubtless tempting to exclaim against the ignorant bourgeois; yet it should not be forgotten, it is he who is to pay us, and that (surely on the face of it) for services that he shall desire to have performed. Here also, if properly considered, there is a question of transcendental honesty. To give the public what they do not want, and yet expect to be supported: we have there a strange pretension, and yet not uncommon, above all with painters. The first duty in this world is for a man to pay his way; when that is quite accomplished, he may plunge into what eccentricity he likes; but emphatically not till then. Till then, he must pay assiduous court to the bourgeois who carries the purse. Robert Louis Stevenson on art as a career.
posted by shivohum on Aug 1, 2013 - 20 comments

Ever Upward - blogging about Space for Tor.com

Ever Upward isn't just a blog about space but a love letter to the wonder and beauty lurking in the science of space. It is written, and occasionally drawn, by MeFite Narrative Priorities [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 1, 2013 - 4 comments

Not Featured: "Waterlillies" or "The Kiss"

What The Posters In Your First Apartment Say About You Now
posted by The Whelk on Jul 31, 2013 - 357 comments

Input Translation Output Rotation

Rubix by University of Greenwich student Chris Kelly -  an Escher-like surrealist film which mixes and rotates urban landscapes like a Rubik's Cube, created for his thesis "Time and Relative Dimensions in Space: The Possibilities of Utilising Virtual[ly Impossible] Environments in Architecture." (via)
posted by Artw on Jul 30, 2013 - 7 comments

see your face in the stars

Artist Sergio Albiac is creating generative portraits from selfies. You can be part of his new exhibition by submitting a photo via Google Drive. "In a nutshell, this experiment, with the participation of an Internet audience, will produce as many artworks as possible.... An automated process will create human portraits as generative collages, using as sources some images from the Hubble Space Telescope. Generated portraits will be exhibited at the flickr Stardust Portrait exhibition."
posted by Annie Savoy on Jul 29, 2013 - 3 comments

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