6910 posts tagged with art.
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DarkAngelØne

George "DarkAngelØne" Redhawk is legally blind, and "likes to play with pictures” to create surreal animated gifs. His full archive contains more than 1000 images. (Some may be NSFW).
posted by zarq on Jul 2, 2015 - 7 comments

"The secret ingredient is imagination, fear."

"The idea is that Hannibal is always eating people, regardless of what he’s feeding you. So I wanted it to look like something that could be lamb’s tongue but probably was a people tongue. Lambs’ tongues are so homely, and once you cook them they just look creepy and unappetizing, and what I want more than anything is for the food to look so delicious that you want to reach into the screen and try it, even though you know it’s people. It’s the personification of Hannibal. He’s the Devil. Why do you like him? Why do you want to get to know him? Why do you want to eat these tongues? They’re people!"
How Hannibal's food stylist, Janice Poon, creates hypothetical human meat
posted by Room 641-A on Jun 30, 2015 - 92 comments

Demons For Dummies Ca. 1775

"A selection of pages from an 18th-century demonology book comprised of more than 30 exquisite watercolours showing various demon figures, as well as magic and cabbalistic signs. The full Latin title of Compendium rarissimum totius Artis Magicae sistematisatae per celeberrimos Artis hujus Magistros, roughly translates to “A rare summary of the entire Magical Art by the most famous Masters of this Art”. With a title page adorned with skeletons and the warning of Noli me tangere (Do not touch me), one quickly gets a sense of the dark oddities lurking inside its pages." - The Public Domain Review presents illustrations from a 18th century guide to demons and demonology (NSFW illustrated nudity, snakes on bits.)
posted by The Whelk on Jun 30, 2015 - 29 comments

Pixel Dailies

@Pixel_Dailies gives you a theme or subject every day for you to draw. They retweet and blog their favorites each day. The art club just had its first birthday.
posted by curious nu on Jun 29, 2015 - 2 comments

Steer the hallucinations of a neural net

Watch a Large Scale Deep neural net hallucinate while onlookers supply topics in a chat room. Almost magically, after a few seconds the psychedelic representations of those suggestions begin creeping out of the woodwork into which you infinitely zoom. Jonas Degrave writes about how the thing came to be on his blog. Previously.
posted by smcameron on Jun 28, 2015 - 24 comments

Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Start Loving Yoko Ono

I have always been drawn to the women who can arouse this kind of vitriol. The kind of hate that seems too big and billowing to be directed at just one woman, the kind that seems like a person or an entire society is vomiting out all its misogyny onto one convenient scapegoat. At some point — after successive Joan of Arc and Courtney Love phases — I started to see this position of feminine abjectness as a kind of superpower. A position from which a woman could offend far more deeply than a man.
Lindsay Zoladz: Yoko Ono and the Myth That Deserves to Die.
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 24, 2015 - 97 comments

the essential work of art is to magnify the ordinary

As with anything in this world, excess is excess, but inadequate is inadequate. A writer must know when the weight of the words used to describe a scene is bearing down on the scene itself. A writer should develop the measuring tape to know when to describe characters' thoughts in long sentences and when not to. But a writer, above all, should aim to achieve artistry with language which, like the painter, is the only canvas we have. Writers should realize that the novels that are remembered, that become monuments, would in fact be those which err on the side of audacious prose, that occasionally allow excess rather than those which package a story — no matter how affecting — in inadequate prose.
Chigozie Obioma for The Millions: The Audacity of Prose.
posted by divined by radio on Jun 23, 2015 - 9 comments

Full cast and crew

David Lebovitz visits the Le Creuset factory in Fresnoy-le-Grand, France.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 22, 2015 - 45 comments

Ceci n'est pas un Parkplatz

Erwin Wurm just received a parking ticket in the city of Karlsruhe. Nothing to write home about, except for the fact that the offending object was one of his artworks. Austrian artist Erwin Wurm has become famous for bending, inflating and twisting cars, trucks and camper-vans in the name of art.
posted by Too-Ticky on Jun 22, 2015 - 6 comments

Mechs, livestock and uhlans

Jakub Rozalski is a Polish illustrator whose artwork mixes retrofuturism and the Polish countryside of the 1920s (with special appearances of Wojtek the army bear), in a style reminiscent of the Kossak dynasty of realist painters, but with mechs. Note that during WW1 the Russians did experiment with the Lebedenko (aka Tsar Tank), a 12-m high, 60-ton war machine that was barely less fantastic than those painted by Rozalski.
posted by elgilito on Jun 19, 2015 - 15 comments

I didn't think it was physically possible, but this both sucks and blows

French magician and juggler Antoine Terrieux created a series of remarkably self-sustaining sculptures using different arrangements of hair dryers, and has also incorporated them in funny ways in his stage performance. He also plays with a diabolo in ways that seem to defy gravity. [via]
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 19, 2015 - 19 comments

Completely enclosed in the hollow of his hand

There is popular music and popular cinema and there is actually popular sculpture. Much of it is what we would usually call ornaments. Some of it is minis — i.e., miniatures. Minis are sculpture for the masses in the same way as pop is music for the masses. (If you are trying to explain this to someone suspicious with an arts degree you can call them Kleinplastik, which means almost the same thing but is German and therefore a valid intellectual construct.)
For HiLoBrow Patrick Stuart starts a new, ten part series analysing the mini figures and models used in wargames as art. In the first he looks at the constraints that go into designing and manufacturing minis. (Originally published at his own blog.)
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 17, 2015 - 26 comments

Miami Weisse

Computer animator and artist Alan Warburton imagines setting J. S. Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier to neon lights [via]
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 15, 2015 - 17 comments

Feelers

Feelers is a typographic experiment based on the movement of animal appendages.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on Jun 13, 2015 - 16 comments

Niki de Saint Phalle

‘I shot against Daddy, all men, small men, tall men, big men, fat men, men, my brother, society, the church, the convent, school, my family, my mother, all men, daddy, myself, men. I shot because it was fun and made me feel great. I shot because I was fascinated watching the painting bleed and die…’— Niki de Saint Phalle. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Jun 12, 2015 - 10 comments

Strike Away

450 painted, sculpted, cut, fired, and sewn artworks made from matchbooks by 225 artists from around the world. More photos at #strikeawayshow on Instagram. Currently on exhibit at Paxton Gate's Curiosities for Kids. (via Lustik)
posted by madamjujujive on Jun 11, 2015 - 5 comments

Bad Art

A Dutch detective and Berlin police spent months searching for art commissioned by Hitler that went missing after German reunification.
Officials finally recovered the dubious works in raids last week -- here's how they did it.
posted by adamvasco on Jun 10, 2015 - 18 comments

and somehow pretend that everything is all right

Anna & Eve is a photo project by artist Viktoria Sorochinski exploring relationships between mother and daughter.
posted by frimble on Jun 10, 2015 - 11 comments

Nothing that surrounds us is object, all is subject.

Archive.org gives us the two part (1) The Threshold of Liberty (II) from the Robert Hughes 1980 BBC documentary Shock of the New.
This episode examined the surrealists' attempts to make art without restrictions. The title is a reference to a piece by René Magritte.
( Unfortunately all the main links in this fine post by Trurl are gone )
posted by adamvasco on Jun 9, 2015 - 3 comments

Kehinde Wiley, turning traditional portraitists into contemporary art

Brooklyn Republic recently closed the exhibition Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic, a mid-career retrospective, going back 14 years, from Kehinde's early styles to the more well-known mix of young black men in casual attire, recreating traditional portrait scenes, with a backdrop of vivid patterns, as seen in the National Portrait Gallery, among other settings. More recently, he has expanded his street-casting to include African American women, as captured in the PBS Arts documentary, Kehinde Wiley: An Economy of Grace. More videos and critical commentary below the break. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 8, 2015 - 8 comments

what's black and white all over?

Daniel Rozin is an artist who makes, among other things, mechanical mirrors like pompom mirror and penguins mirror [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 5, 2015 - 15 comments

YASKAWA BUSHIDO PROJECT

industrial robot vs sword master (SLYT)
posted by OverlappingElvis on Jun 5, 2015 - 48 comments

The art of motion control

Marbles, magnets, and sand - the hypnotic art of Bruce Shapiro [via]
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 3, 2015 - 7 comments

Books & Records

Simon James is an artist who turns record albums into Penguin-esque book collections. He also has a handful of half-forgotten classics & recession books. [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Jun 3, 2015 - 12 comments

"Why do you have to talk about that stuff?"

David Sedaris talks about surviving the suicide of his sister Tiffany
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 2, 2015 - 78 comments

Loplop

And Loplop, bird superior, has transformed himself into flesh without flesh and will dwell among us.
Loplop was the Dada and Surrealist artist Max Ernst's alter ego. whose beloved pet cockatoo had died the same night his sister was born.
He described his birth in 1891 as having hatched from an egg that his mother laid.
Ernst took many ideas incorporated in Freud's works and used them to try to identify himself, in 1922 painting Oedipus Rex and then in 1922 Two children are threatened by a nightingale.
In 1931 Loplop; who had the previous year introduced Loplop, now introduced the surrealist group.
Ernst described collage as the "alchemy of the visual image". Loplop was the narrator in his alchemical collage novel Une Semaine de Bonté. as he had previously with La Femme de 100 tetes.
In 1937 he painted Fireside Angel predicting the rise of Fascism. and in 1940 he painted Attirement of the bride depicting his then lover Leonora Carrington. With the war arriving in Europe Ernst left for America. Loplop lived on at least through to 1960 in his sculpture.
posted by adamvasco on May 31, 2015 - 12 comments

the hush of the night sky is the silence of a graveyard

The Great Silence is a collaboration between artists Allora & Calzadilla and writer Ted Chiang. Transcript
posted by fearfulsymmetry on May 30, 2015 - 5 comments

You don’t just live with art, you live in art.

In Seattle, Xenia is not only a "one bedroom in Eastlake", it's an Airbnb art installation you can rent for a $100 a night.
posted by ShooBoo on May 29, 2015 - 17 comments

"The map began as just a doodle."

In the summer of 1963 Jerry Gretzinger began drawing a map of an imaginary city. You can now use Jerry's Map to zoom in on any of the over 3,200 eight by ten inch panels of the original paper map, executed in acrylic, marker, colored pencil, ink, collage, and inkjet print. This short film by Greg Whitmore takes a fascinating look at the project and the artist's process, which "is dictated by the interplay between an elaborate set of rules and randomly generated instructions." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on May 26, 2015 - 2 comments

Burning bridges over (already) troubled waters

The music of the legendary Simon and Garfunkel seems to still have a life of its own, long after they broke up in 1970. The great songwriter Paul Simon went on, of course, to have a highly successful solo career, and Art did a few films and several albums. They reunited for several tours over the years (most notably, Central Park in 1982, full concert here, and the on-and-off, often acrimonious friction has been widely reported. In this new Art Garfunkel interview, the singer cuts loose again on Simon and the results are not pretty. (You may want to read the comments below the piece Rolling Stone did on this, many are quite insightful)
posted by Seekerofsplendor on May 24, 2015 - 46 comments

"By this art you may contemplate the variation of the 23 letters."

http://libraryofbabel.info/
The Library of Babel is a place for scholars to do research, for artists and writers to seek inspiration, for anyone with curiosity or a sense of humor to reflect on the weirdness of existence - in short, it’s just like any other library. If completed, it would contain every possible combination of 1,312,000 characters, including lower case letters, space, comma, and period. Thus, it would contain every book that ever has been written, and every book that ever could be - including every play, every song, every scientific paper, every legal decision, every constitution, every piece of scripture, and so on. At present it contains all possible pages of 3200 characters, about 104677 books. [more inside]
posted by andoatnp on May 24, 2015 - 59 comments

"So, what do you do?"

A 10-step guide to party conversation for bioinformaticians
posted by a lungful of dragon on May 23, 2015 - 36 comments

A way to keep pollinating bees around without chemicals? There mite bee.

"The first 21 days of a bee's life in 60 seconds" is a time-lapse video by photographer Anand Varma, who discusses his collaboration with the bee lab at UC Davis in breeding a naturally mite-resistant line of honeybees. (Via.)
posted by a lungful of dragon on May 22, 2015 - 15 comments

Emerald. Elegant. Curious. Hidden. Unseen. Dragon. Treasures. Unbound.

The Asians Art Museum is a parody site bringing a cirtical lens to orientalist tropes in art museums, prompted particularly by rhetorical choices of the San Francisco Art Museum's 2009 Lords of the Samurai exhibition [audio]. It highlights the tendency for museums showing Asian art to present their shows as a"a harmless trip to a fantasyland of romanticized premodern Otherness, a place where dreams of Manifest Destiny never have to die?" [more inside]
posted by Miko on May 21, 2015 - 24 comments

danny devitos smug cat face looking out over everything i do, forever

a story of a lovely porcelain cup with kitty Danny Devito on it [more inside]
posted by NoraReed on May 20, 2015 - 17 comments

A gorgeously tiled and carved Moroccan court, at a reduced scale

Building the Moroccan Court at the Metropolitan Museum of Art [slyt, 17m44s] "In 2011, The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia, which house the Museum's renowned collection of Islamic art. A vital part of the installation was the Patti Cadby Birch Court, a Moroccan court built by a team of experts—from curators and historians to designers and craftsmen—over many months.... This video documents a marvelous journey from Fez to New York, and the creation of a twenty-first-century court using traditional fifteenth-century methods."
posted by ocherdraco on May 20, 2015 - 5 comments

Homemade Lava

Hot out of the furnace. Instructions included. Banana for scale. (SLArs) (previously)
posted by dobi on May 18, 2015 - 22 comments

I'll be out in a minute

This past year, artist Lucy Gafford developed an intriguing new medium. It's well suited to evocative sketches of simple subjects -- a portrait of Mom, a still life of avocados, a cat, a feeding pig. Please enjoy her hashtag exhibition, #ShowerHairMasterpiece.
posted by Countess Elena on May 15, 2015 - 11 comments

Mike Grost's Auteurist Checklists

Diligent lists of the recurring images, events, themes, and subjects in the films of Orson Welles, George Cukor, Michael Antonioni, Jacques Tourneur, Frank Capra, John Ford, Anthony Mann, Agnès Varda, Howard Hawks, Robert Siodmak, Louis Feuillade, and many other directors.
posted by Iridic on May 14, 2015 - 9 comments

TimeSinkTimeSinkTimeSinkTimeSink

The beinArt Collective is an international network of highly skilled figurative artists with a shared fascination for surreal and imaginative themes.
There are three pages of artists which all link on to the artists own websites.
There is also a page with links to some interesting magazines, and beinArt has an active FB page
Some pages NSFW and some could induce nightmares.
posted by adamvasco on May 13, 2015 - 3 comments

Putting artists to work in World War II

The crazy idea was this: The United States Army would design a “deception unit”: a unit that would appear to the enemy as a large armored division with tanks, trucks, artillery, and thousands of soldiers. But this unit would actually be equipped only with fake tanks, fake trucks, fake artillery and manned by just a handful of soldiers.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on May 13, 2015 - 32 comments

No Pixel Small Enough

Dinofarm Games explain why the demand for higher definition graphics have led them to abandon pixel art... over the course of a wonderfully explained, beautifully illustrated, and clearly demonstrated love letter to pixel art.
posted by gilrain on May 12, 2015 - 32 comments

WELCOME TO SWEDEN

The Singing Sailor Underwater Defense System - the Swedish Peace and Arbitration Society sends out a message of peace, love, understanding and respect to Russian submariners cruising through the Stockholm archepelago
posted by a lungful of dragon on May 12, 2015 - 8 comments

The $179 Million Picasso

Picasso's "Les Femmes d'Alger" sold for a record-breaking $179,365,000 yesterday at a Christie's auction in New York. [more inside]
posted by ourt on May 12, 2015 - 48 comments

Re-keyed

Michael Moerkirk makes metal into art.
posted by Deoridhe on May 11, 2015 - 3 comments

"My god, are they going to leave me here to die?"

The late Roger Ebert writes about a piece conceptual artist Chris Burden performed at the Museum of Contemporary Art in 1975. Chris Burden previously on Metafilter.
posted by Juliet Banana on May 11, 2015 - 23 comments

The Pen is Mightier than the Sword

Seb Lester is an astonishing calligrapher and graphic designer. In this clip, he freehands a number of famous logos... [more inside]
posted by quin on May 9, 2015 - 35 comments

Beth vs. Beth

"I created a series of pop culture-inspired portraits of my friend Beth, playfully celebrating her fantastic weight loss of 150 pounds. I shot her "Before" and "After" selves two years apart, and the digitally integrated them to interact with each other within each scene. To properly communicate and celebrate Beth's accomplishment, her body shape has not been digitally altered."
Photographer Blake Morrow on The Beth Project
posted by Room 641-A on May 9, 2015 - 51 comments

Our Thing

“African Americans,” he wrote in one of his section introductions for Hokum, “like any other Americans, are an angry people with fragile egos. Humor is vengeance. Sometimes you laugh to keep from crying. Sometimes you laugh to keep from shooting … black folk are mad at everybody, so duck, because you’re bound to be in someone’s line of fire.” Paul Beatty on Satire, Racism and Writing for "Weirdos", from the Paris Review.
posted by chavenet on May 9, 2015 - 6 comments

The Great & Beautiful Lost Kingdoms

Yet to tell the diffusion of Indian influence at this period as two separate processes partially obscures a still more extraordinary story. For it is now increasingly clear that between the fourth and twelfth centuries the influence of India in both Southeast and Central Asia, and to some degree also China, was comparable to the influence of Greece in Aegean Turkey and Rome, and then in the rest of Europe in the early centuries BC. From the empire of the Gupta dynasty in the north and that of the Pallava dynasty in the south, India during this period radiated its philosophies, political ideas, and architectural forms out over an entire continent not by conquest but by sheer cultural sophistication.
posted by infini on May 9, 2015 - 21 comments

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