505 posts tagged with baseball.
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HEY HEY PITCH THAT BASE CATCH THAT BAT WHO CARES

Jon Bois uses the science of crowdsourcing to create the perfect game of baseball.
posted by Navelgazer on Jul 18, 2015 - 17 comments

[BONK.]

"Let me begin by saying that I believe this is the greatest and most important event ever captured on film. I saw it live, but I was alone, sadly, and had no one with whom to share it. For a while, I wasn’t even sure I had seen what I thought I had seen, and I couldn’t go back to double-check. This was in 2000 — before TiVo became a verb, kids. This document is essentially prehistoric. It might as well be printed on papyrus." Michael Schur, The Greatest Moment in the History of the Triple-A All-Star Game
posted by everybody had matching towels on Jul 15, 2015 - 40 comments

Baseball and Caviar

The Los Angeles Angels baseball team found themselves embroiled in controversy recently when Robert Alvarado, the team's Vice-President of Marketing and Ticket Sales, brushed aside concerns about decreased attendance at the ballpark this season by stating, "We may not be reaching as many of the people on the lower end of the socioeconomic ladder, but those people, they may enjoy the game, but they pay less, and we’re not seeing the conversion on the per-caps,”. This statement by Alvarado prompted this OC Weekly blog headline: Anaheim Angels: We Don't Need Poor Fans, and We Don't Want Them. Alvarado resigned yesterday from the Angels organization.
posted by The Gooch on Jun 18, 2015 - 58 comments

Cardinals vs. Astros: Information Security Edition

Last summer, ten months worth of the Houston Astros' confidential notes on trades and acquisitions leaked onto the web. The FBI now thinks the St. Louis Cardinals were behind the breach. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Jun 16, 2015 - 64 comments

Welcome to the Cup of Coffee Club. See ya.

"Of the 17,808 players (and counting) who’ve run up the dugout steps and onto a Major League field, only 974 have had one-game careers." These are some of their stories.
posted by artsandsci on May 21, 2015 - 8 comments

But if you’re not a fan, this probably seems absurd.

Battering the Batter
For too long, MLB has tolerated the 'tradition' of pitchers intentionally hitting the other team's players. That needs to change.
posted by andoatnp on May 6, 2015 - 83 comments

Today's Orioles and White Sox Game Will Be Played in an Empty Stadium

Today's Orioles and White Sox game at Camden Yards in Baltimore will be the first game in MLB history played in an empty stadium. However, the phenomenon is more common in football (soccer) because of reasons ranging from punishment for racist fans to fears of contagious diseases. The crew at 538.com suggest that the Orioles might lose the home-field advantage from umpiring calls that teams playing in front of a friendly crowd typically enjoy. If you want to view the surreal scene yourself, the game is MLB.com's free game of the day.
posted by Fister Roboto on Apr 29, 2015 - 187 comments

WTF is a Met?

Chris Rock on HBO's Real Sports explaining why Black People Do Not Watch Baseball, and Why It Matters
posted by Potomac Avenue on Apr 22, 2015 - 27 comments

"I was doing fine until they started bunting."

Philadelphia — 1912. In a matter of hours, college student Allan Travers, 20, went from having never pitched a game in his life to starting pitcher for the Detroit Tigers. [more inside]
posted by starman on Apr 20, 2015 - 29 comments

Mr. Bradley Is Very Intimidating

In the spring of 2003, Milton Bradley, a switch-hitting outfielder for the Indians, met his future wife, Monique Williams, a community relations intern with the team. He was about to turn 25. She was 22. Over the next decade—while the erratic, belligerent Bradley was given a pass by many MLB teams, media members and the sports culture at large—he and Williams would be locked in a cycle of emotional and physical abuse, separation and reconciliation, police intervention and court conflict. The Ray Rice elevator video, shocking as it was, captured only one moment. But a trove of public records shows the tragic extent of the Bradleys' violent relationship. This Is What Domestic Abuse Looks Like from Sports Illustrated [Trigger Warning; Graphic text and photos].
posted by chavenet on Apr 9, 2015 - 29 comments

All the presidents’ delightfully awkward first pitches

Photographs of America’s most powerful men throwing the ceremonial first pitch gives some indication of why they got into politics. via NPR's Tumblr
posted by sacrifix on Apr 6, 2015 - 47 comments

The Green Fields of the Mind

It breaks your heart. It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring, when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face the fall alone. You count on it, rely on it to buffer the passage of time, to keep the memory of sunshine and high skies alive, and then just when the days are all twilight, when you need it most, it stops. Today, October 2, a Sunday of rain and broken branches and leaf-clogged drains and slick streets, it stopped, and summer was gone... (full audio on YT) (transcript)
With Major League Baseball season starting its season this Sunday, now is a good time to revisit Bart Giamatti's lyrical ode to the game, "The Green Fields of the Mind." [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Apr 2, 2015 - 31 comments

Just in time for the baseball season...

Baseball behind barbed wire The year was 1944. A playoff series between two all-star baseball teams generated ample excitement. Gila River fought Heart Mountain in thirteen games to win the series. The players described it as exhilarating. But the players taking part in this all-American pastime did so in dire circumstances. Gila River and Heart Mountain were both Japanese incarceration camps (previously known as internment camps), and these athletes were among the tens of thousands of Japanese Americans imprisoned there.
posted by dfm500 on Mar 21, 2015 - 6 comments

Traded to Chicago Cubs for a washing machine.

Not everyone was delighted when Will Ferrell played 10 positions for 10 different teams (all field positions and base coach) in five games in one day last week in the Cactus League--in order to raise awareness and money for Stand Up to Cancer and Cancer for College--but honestly, most people were. [more inside]
posted by jessamyn on Mar 16, 2015 - 45 comments

Butt Bat Girl

When Manga, public art and slapstick comedy collide [more inside]
posted by Megami on Mar 6, 2015 - 7 comments

Hey Dad, I can't see real good- is that Bill Shakespeare over there?

This is where Norris has chosen to live while he tries to win a job in the Blue Jays' rotation: a broken down van parked under the blue fluorescent lights of a Wal-Mart in the Florida suburbs.
posted by stinkfoot on Mar 5, 2015 - 31 comments

Is Charlie Brown the Worst Manager Ever?

Is Charlie Brown the Worst Manager Ever? Without box scores, we can’t measure Brown based on Pythag, and without statistics, we can’t even try to measure the team’s performance against its WAR, as Adam Darowski once suggested. We don’t even have an idea of the league’s playing environment, given that we know less about Brown’s rivals than even his own team. (It would seem, based on the pitches he’s seen to swing through, that most pitchers can throw harder than the batters can handle.) We can only broadly guess at Brown’s skills or habits as a tactician based on what little we know. Please consider the following science inexact. (via SpoFi)
posted by Ufez Jones on Mar 4, 2015 - 23 comments

Curt Schilling 1, Internet Trolls 0

Curt Schilling's tweet congratulating his daughter on her college acceptance was met with the usual assortment of congratulatory replies from friends and fans, some light-heated "can't wait to date her" messages from current students at her future school, and a few seriously vile and offensive responses. The authors of the latter group probably regret their actions today.
posted by COD on Mar 3, 2015 - 199 comments

To be honest, he was going to be hanging out that summer anyway.

If you didn’t know better, you wouldn’t believe it all happened in the space of about five weeks in the summer of 1978. But it did happen. In those five weeks, Bill Murray played professional baseball and established himself as a bona fide movie star and the Grays Harbor Loggers – representing the twin cities of Aberdeen and Hoquiam, Washington – posted the best winning percentage in America and won the Harbor’s only professional sports championship in living memory.
posted by Chrysostom on Feb 16, 2015 - 11 comments

"Little things are big." ~ Yogi Berra

Jackie Robinson West Stripped of Its National Little League Title [New York Times]
An investigation revealed that the Chicago team, which captured the attention of the country last summer, had falsified boundaries to field ineligible players.
[more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 11, 2015 - 117 comments

Let's play two for Mr. Cub.

Hall of Fame shortstop Ernie Banks has died at 83. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Jan 23, 2015 - 42 comments

Rarer than hitting for the cycle...

Here's a list of baseball players who have stolen second, third and home in the same inning. [more inside]
posted by artsandsci on Dec 4, 2014 - 30 comments

Out at Home

"I am extremely grateful that Major League Baseball has always judged me on my work and nothing else"
In a "very quiet and understated way", 29-year veteran MLB umpire Dale Scott has become the first active official in any of the major US sports to come out as gay.
posted by The Gooch on Dec 3, 2014 - 33 comments

Panik to Crawford to Belt

MLB.com's StatCast dissects the World Series Game Seven double play seen as key to the San Francisco Giants win over the Kansas City Royals. [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Nov 5, 2014 - 20 comments

Brains vs. Brawn in Baseball

The Economist examines the cult of the genius GM.
In sports, just like the rest of life, the rich keep getting richer. Anyone who saw or read Moneyball knows that the deck is stacked against small-market Major League Baseball (MLB) teams. Their only hope of competing, Michael Lewis’s story goes, is to acquire brilliant, innovative general managers (GMs) like his protagonist Billy Beane, who have mastered the “art of winning an unfair game” by outmaneuvering wealthier clubs. The problem with this narrative is that there is nothing to stop the sport’s plutocrats from hiring the finest minds money can buy, just as they sign the best athletes.
The deep-pocketed Dodgers have lured away small market Tampa Bay's heralded GM Andrew Friedman to find out what happens when a man who consistently builds winners with one of the smallest revenue streams in the game can do with a payroll in excess of $200 million.
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 15, 2014 - 32 comments

I cut my teeth on series rings... in the 80's

A surprisingly prescient cover of Royals, made back in March 2014. Today the parody is a timely paean to the boys in blue from Kansas City: they have won all three of their post-season games... their first since 1985.
posted by Cold Lurkey on Oct 4, 2014 - 47 comments

Bad News Beards

Who's the hairiest team in baseball? The Washington Post weighted the style of facial hair, or lack thereof, of all active ballplayers on a scale of 0 to 8 — zero being clean shaven, eight being the grizzliest — then calculated the average hairiness of each team.
posted by troika on Oct 3, 2014 - 24 comments

It would be my greatest acting challenge.

Bryan Cranston performs the entire MLB post-season. (SLYT)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Sep 16, 2014 - 11 comments

What happened to...?

Lost treasures of Baseball -The Dauvray Cup -Shoeless Joe's Confession -The McGreevy Collection of Baseball pictures -Eddie Grant's plaque from the Polo Grounds -Bill Mazeroski's home run ball from the 1960 World Series -An eight-foot tall statue of Babe Ruth
posted by dfm500 on Sep 2, 2014 - 5 comments

Japanese slugger attempts to hit 186 mph fastball

Former Nippon Pro Baseball home-run king Takashi Yamasaki tries to hit a 186 mph (300 km/hour) fastball from a pitching machine. Skip to 3:29 for the fun part. (SLYT, Japanese)
posted by DirtyOldTown on Aug 29, 2014 - 56 comments

"Cubs 1908. White Sox 2005. Jackie Robinson West 2014."

Chicago's Jackie Robinson West Little League team just clinched the U.S. Championship in the Little League World Series, becoming the first all-African-American team to do so. They face the South Korean squad tomorrow. The team has attracted many prominent supporters, from Chicago and elsewhere.
posted by SisterHavana on Aug 23, 2014 - 12 comments

She Throws Like a Girl (with a 70 MPH fastball)

This past Sunday, Philadelphia's Taney Dragons punched their ticket to the Little League World Series behind the complete game shutout pitching performance of Mo'Ne Davis, who at 13-years-old already throws a 70 MPH fastball. Davis will become only the 17th girl to play in the LLWS in 68 years. She has become an inspiration to others as she redefines what it means to "throw like a girl".
posted by The Gooch on Aug 12, 2014 - 40 comments

A nice story about baseball

Baseball writer Rany Jazayerli tells us about his online acquaintance Sung Woo Lee, fan of the Kansas City Royals, who is having a good week. He's been a Royals fan since the 1990s and this week, he came to the US to see them play for the first time. KC rolled out the red carpet and the Royals are even winning. [more inside]
posted by LobsterMitten on Aug 11, 2014 - 16 comments

The Best Beer in Baseball

The Washington Post compares beers available at various ballparks, based on locality, quality and uniqueness.
posted by frimble on Aug 9, 2014 - 23 comments

What if there was a Robot cheering for those fans?

The Hanwha Eagles, a much beleaguered South Korean major league baseball team have introduced Fanbots, jersey-clad robots who lead cheers, display messages (and selfies where the robot would otherwise have a blank screen) sent in from fans at home, and generally stand in for fans who aren't there. [more inside]
posted by julen on Jul 30, 2014 - 13 comments

Tuesday afternoon sportz journalizm chuckles

An Oral History of the 1989 Cleveland Indians. It was 1989, and no one knew that the usually predictable world of Major League Baseball was about to get as topsy turvy as it could. Here's the story of a plucky band of misfits, fighting against the entrenched baseball establishment, to obtain success in their efforts against their playing opponents, and an evil owner bent on relocation. [more inside]
posted by LoRichTimes on Jul 22, 2014 - 35 comments

The many crimes of baseball's Mel Hall

"What was his weapon? Trust. Over and over again, he shook the hand of a parent and said, 'It's OK. I'll take care of them. I'll make her a better person.' Instead what he did was rob them of their innocence and change the scope of their lives."

SB Nation on Mel Hall - "a flamboyant baseball player, a charismatic coach, and a sexual predator."
posted by porn in the woods on Jul 18, 2014 - 15 comments

No Joy In Baseball World

For 20 years, he was the biggest name in youth baseball. His coaching popularized a new wave of analysis, while his instructional videos entranced a generation of professional players and fans. And those iconic TV commercials turned him into a pop-culture phenomenon. Then, as suddenly as he arrived, Tom Emanski was gone.
posted by Ghostride The Whip on Jul 17, 2014 - 4 comments

Mile (Legal) High Stadium

"If I had done this in either of New York's baseball stadiums I would have bankrupted myself by the sixth inning."
posted by snottydick on Jul 16, 2014 - 29 comments

Today, I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth

Lou Gehrig's farewell speech at Yankee Stadium on its 75th anniversary. It was immortalized by Gary Cooper in the 1942 film Pride of the Yankees, although the speech as delivered in the movie differed a little bit from the actual speech. The Historic Films Stock Footage Archive has this video of the speech on Youtube. Today, Major League Baseball pays tribute to Gehrig by putting together a video in which contemporary players recite the speech. (Video of this is embedded in the first link).
posted by obscure simpsons reference on Jul 4, 2014 - 8 comments

R.I.P., Mr. Padre

Baseball Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn has died at age 54. In his 20 years with the San Diego Padres, Gwynn racked up over 3,100 hits, a .338 career batting average--the 18th-best of all time--and eight batting title, the second-most in Major League history.
posted by Cash4Lead on Jun 16, 2014 - 74 comments

Vin Scully Retrospective

Vin Scully: voice of the Dodgers for 64 years "My idea is that I'm sitting next to the listener in the ballpark, and we're just watching the game," Scully says. "Sometimes, our conversation leaves the game. It might be a little bit about the weather we're enduring or enjoying. It might be personal relationships, which would involve a player. The game is just one long conversation and I'm anticipating that, and I will say things like ‘Did you know that?' or ‘You're probably wondering why.' I'm really just conversing rather than just doing play-by-play. I never thought of myself as having a style. I don't use key words. And the best thing I do? I shut up."
posted by mandymanwasregistered on Jun 6, 2014 - 22 comments

"Let's go get 'em, boys," he said, arming himself with a fungo bat....

The 1974 Cleveland Indians baseball team "were a smorgasbord of mediocre and forgettable talent playing in an open-air mausoleum" where 85% of the seats at home games went unsold. So the Indians tried to drum up business with a "10-Cent Beer Night" promotion. What could possibly go wrong? The final tally, 40 years ago this evening: 25,134 fans in attendance. 60,000 Genesee beers at 10¢ each. 50 cops. 19 streakers. 7 emergency room injuries. 9 arrests. 2 bare moons. 2 bouncing breasts and 1 sportswriter, punched in the jaw. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 4, 2014 - 28 comments

Meet Scott Boras, the superagent who scored the Nats their top talent

Baseball’s Best Lobbyist [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 27, 2014 - 5 comments

No Relation

It's easy to explain why you love a conventionally excellent player, but way, way more fun to try and explain the appeal of a top-flight athlete whose every step and twitch appeared to be bringing him dangerously close to death itself. You had this guy, St. Louis, and he was awesome and everything, but every time he hit a triple he'd pop up and have the saddest look on his face like everything he loved had died, and left him with the soul of an ancient, sad, and immortal Golem. It was like watching Buster Keaton play centerfield, and he was like that every time he played.
SB Nation Reviews: Willie McGee
posted by davidjmcgee on May 16, 2014 - 43 comments

*The New York Yankees were removed to make this map possible.

Up Close on Baseball's Borders is a detailed, zoomable interactive map which uses data from Facebook to present the team preferences of baseball fandom in the United States. Around the end of March, Facebook had released a map using the same data which despite being touted as most accurate ever, had significant problems. The most notable of these issues was a colorshift introduced as the main graphic went viral, rendering the map illegible. [more inside]
posted by mwhybark on Apr 24, 2014 - 183 comments

Oh God, we don't have to build a football field now, do we?

That's right folks, Field of Dreams is 25 years old. W.P. Kinsella reflects on how his novel "Shoeless Joe" was adapted into the timeless baseball/father-son movie, including how he made peace with the studio changing the name of J.D. Salinger's character. [more inside]
posted by dry white toast on Apr 21, 2014 - 89 comments

The story of how Yasiel Puig made his way from Cuba to Los Angeles

Escape from Cuba: Yasiel Puig's Untold Journey to the Dodgers
For close to a year Puig had been trying to force an answer, to extract himself from Fidel Castro’s state-run sports machine, which paid him $17 a month, and sneak across the tropics to a mythical north, where even benchwarmers lived like kings. Two, three, four times, maybe more, he had risked everything and fled, only to be detained by the Cuban authorities or intercepted by the U.S. Coast Guard—each failure making the next attempt more urgent. Finally, in June 2012, the 21-year-old outfielder left his home in Cienfuegos, on Cuba’s southern shore, and set off by car for the northern province of Matanzas, just 90 miles from Florida. He was traveling with three companions: a boxer, a pinup girl, and a Santeria priest, the latter of whom blessed their expedition with a splash of rum and a sprinkle of chicken blood.

posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates on Apr 14, 2014 - 20 comments

Expos 8, Cardinals 7

45 years ago today at Montreal's Jarry Park, outfielder Mack "The Knife" Jones hit a 3-run homer and a 2-run triple to lead his Montreal Expos to an 8-7 win over the St. Louis Cardinals in the first Major League baseball game ever played outside the US (home opener coverage starts at 4:28 of the CBC video). [more inside]
posted by rocket88 on Apr 14, 2014 - 12 comments

Life imitates art.

In 2002, Lalo Alcaraz drew a depressing political cartoon. In 2014, it happened in real life.
posted by Faint of Butt on Apr 10, 2014 - 98 comments

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