499 posts tagged with baseball.
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The bullet missed his brain but severed his optic nerves

A Real World Series: Inside the world championship of blind baseball. "It’s different this year. I can’t get last year’s Series out of my mind, even though it ended in the last week of July, when Taiwan took two from Austin on a rainy Saturday in Ames, Iowa, to win the title in the 37th annual world series of blind baseball." [more inside]
posted by mwhybark on Feb 17, 2013 - 7 comments

Rick Reuschel should be in the Hall of Fame

The Hall of Fame voters have decided not to enshrine one of the greatest pitchers of all time, despite his stellar on-field performance. No, not Roger Clemens: Rick Reuschel, who, according to High Heat Stats, was one of the 50 greatest pitchers in baseball history. Bonus: Joe Posnanski on why Rich Reuschel was better than Jack Morris.
posted by escabeche on Feb 9, 2013 - 10 comments

Pride of the Yankees (seeknaY?)

In the classic baseball movie The Pride of the Yankees, Gary Cooper played lefty icon Lou Gehrig--but Cooper was a righty. To cover this up, legend has it the filmmakers made a Yankees uniform for him with the print reversed, had him run to third base rather than first, etc, then flipped the shots after filming. But is it true? [more inside]
posted by LobsterMitten on Feb 5, 2013 - 20 comments

Ecce homo

"Footage of Pope John Paul at an indoor batting cage during his 1987 visit to California"
posted by growabrain on Jan 22, 2013 - 36 comments

Stan the Man

A day after Earl Weaver, Cardinal great Stan Musial has passed away. Stan spent 22 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals, racking up a lifetime batting average of .331 and was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969.
posted by holmesian on Jan 19, 2013 - 45 comments

The smallest Hall of all

For some reason, this year no one was elected to the Hall of Fame.
posted by RogerB on Jan 10, 2013 - 65 comments

Somewhere on the internet, someone thinks that not only can your team trade for Stanton, but it won’t be that hard.

Giancarlo (a.k.a. "Mike") Stanton is one of the most exciting young baseball players in the game today. Known primarily as a power hitter with potential Hall of Fame talent, he has hit some legendary home runs, including one he hit as a minor leaguer that reportedly traveled 500+ ft on its way out of Montgomery Riverwalk Stadium and another that broke the scoreboard at Marlins Park and, at an off-bat speed 122.4 mph, was the hardest hit home run ever recorded by the ESPN Hit Tracker. Tampa Bay Rays pitcher David Price likened Stanton to a video game "create a player." But recently, when the Miami Marlins dumped five of his teammates in a blockbuster, cost-cutting trade with the Blue Jays (effectively removing them from contention for the near future), Stanton expressed his dissatisfaction publicly, opening up rumors that he might be next to be traded. Internet baseball fans responded by proposing their own hypothetical (and often wildly optimistic) trade ideas, which Ben Lindbergh of Baseball Prospectus kindly compiled into one list: Stanton trade packages proposed by fans of every team on the internet this offseason.
posted by albrecht on Jan 4, 2013 - 8 comments

Christopher Robin is a Sadist

Flash Friday!!! It's Winnie The Pooh Home Run Derby! In Japanese! And insanely difficult!
posted by clorox on Jan 4, 2013 - 42 comments

At home, there's no line for the bathroom, either

Some sports are better seen in person. Some are better seen on TV.
posted by Chrysostom on Dec 17, 2012 - 47 comments

Baseball Magazine, 1908-1920

Baseball Magazine, founded by Jake Morse in 1908, was the first monthly baseball magazine in the United States. The LA84 Foundation has posted free online copies of the first thirteen years of Baseball Magazine. [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Dec 16, 2012 - 8 comments

Wherever he winds up

2012 has been one great year for pitcher R.A. Dickey. He climbed Kilimanjaro. He published a well-received autobiography revealing for the first time that he'd been a victim of sexual abuse as a child. He starred in a documentary about the knuckleball at the same time as he continued his reinvention of the pitch, to often dramatic effect. After a fantastic season, he became the first knuckleball pitcher, and one of the oldest pitchers ever, to win the Cy Young Award, pitchers' highest honor. And now, pending a contract extension, he's been traded to the rapidly improving Toronto Blue Jays.
posted by RogerB on Dec 16, 2012 - 40 comments

Let's Eliminate Sports Welfare

Let's Eliminate Sports Welfare
posted by no regrets, coyote on Dec 12, 2012 - 85 comments

"But more important than mere longevity was the fact that he had lived through and been a part of more baseball history than almost any other man."

The results of the 2013 Baseball Hall of Fame Veterans Committee Election were released today, and the three men elected were Jacob Ruppert, who owned the Yankees for 24 years and helped steer the team from mediocrity in the 1910s to some of the greatest teams in baseball history; Hank O'Day, one of the longest-serving umpires in league history and the man who made the official ruling on Merkle's Boner, and Deacon White, the first great catcher and one of the main players in the first baseball dynasty, the Boston Red Stockings of the 1870s National Association. [more inside]
posted by Copronymus on Dec 3, 2012 - 9 comments

"And a very pleasant evening to you wherever you may be..."

Today is the 85th birthday of Hall of Fame baseball announcer Vin Scully. He will be returning next year for his unprecedented 64th season calling games for the Dodgers, in a career reaching back to the team's Brooklyn days and their move to Los Angeles in 1958. The New York Yankees tried to pry him away in the 1960s, but he remained with the team and has become an LA institution. In the 21st Century, he has inspired blog names and tattoos and even dabbled in the online world himself during a game last season -- as an experiment, he asked fans to get a topic trending on Twitter about Dodger catcher A.J. Ellis, "a nice boy." Later in the broadcast he announced sheepishly that Ellis was trending across the U.S. This coming Monday, he will be taking over the team's Twitter feed to answer questions -- tag your tweets #askvin. [more inside]
posted by Celsius1414 on Nov 29, 2012 - 23 comments

"If at any time during my tenure here you find there’s a pattern of owners and owners’ officials singing my praises, you’d better fire me. I’m not kidding."

Marvin Miller, labor economist and former executive of the MLBPA, has died at the age of 95.
posted by Groundhog Week on Nov 28, 2012 - 11 comments

Goodbye, Yankees

Who to root for now? As a result of FOX/News Corp. going into business with the New York Yankees through by acquiring a 49% stake in the Yankees's regional sports network, Craig Robinson disavows his Yankees fandom, and goes in search of a new baseball team to which to swear his allegiance and passion.
posted by dry white toast on Nov 21, 2012 - 93 comments

Skill-Luck Continuum

"We have little trouble recognizing that a chess grandmaster’s victory over a novice is skill, as well as assuming that Paul the octopus’s ability to predict World Cup games is due to chance. But what about everything else?" [Luck and Skill Untangled: The Science of Success]
posted by vidur on Nov 20, 2012 - 16 comments

Coronet Instructional Films

From the mid 40s to the mid 50s Coronet Instructional Films were always ready to provide social guidance for teenagers on subjects as diverse as dating, popularity, preparing for being drafted, and shyness, as well as to children on following the law, the value of quietness in school, and appreciating our parents. They also provided education on topics such as the connection between attitudes and health, what kind of people live in America, how to keep a job, supervising women workers, the nature of capitalism, and the plantation System in Southern life. Inside is an annotated collection of all 86 of the complete Coronet films in the Prelinger Archives as well as a few more. Its not like you had work to do or anything right? [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Nov 1, 2012 - 41 comments

Revisiting Baseball's Perez Brothers after Pasqual's Death

"My best start I win one-nothing," he recalls. "I have single, double, two RBI." A quote from Chi Cho Perez, father of the Perez brothers, chronicled in this classic 1990 Sports Illustrated article. Soberingly, Pasqual Perez, famous for among other things missing a start because he was circling Atlanta repeatedly, was found murdered in the Dominican Republic today.
posted by mcstayinskool on Nov 1, 2012 - 15 comments

Matt Cain destroys things

Matt Cain with Tori and Kari from Mythbusters destroys things mid air with his fastball (SLYT)
posted by Long Way To Go on Oct 28, 2012 - 263 comments

"This never happens during MY matches."

Some folks in CHIKARA Pro were having a wrestling match, and a baseball game broke out.
posted by mightygodking on Oct 27, 2012 - 20 comments

StubHub Data

Baseball or Football? How Your Sports Choices ... Reveal your Politics. StubHub crunched their ticket data and found that baseball states tend to vote blue and football states tend to vote red. [via PostRoad's very excellent linkblog (nsfw)]
posted by caddis on Oct 12, 2012 - 51 comments

I've got it! I've got it!

Down by three runs with runners at first and second and one out in last night's first-ever NL Wildcard Playoff Game, Braves' shortstop Andrelton Simmons hit a pop fly to left field. Cardinals' shortstop Pete Kozma went back to make the catch but broke off at the last second, and the ball dropped. The runners advanced, and almost everyone thought it was bases loaded with one out. But left-field umpire Sam Holbrook invoked the infield fly rule, and so, Simmons was out on the play. Video of the whole thing here. Braves fans were not happy. [more inside]
posted by Jonathan Livengood on Oct 6, 2012 - 54 comments

Why not?

Their last winning season came in 1997. Only one member of their Opening Day starting rotation remains, a 27-year-old from Taiwan who hadn't pitched in the majors before this year. The others have been replaced by a Red Sox cast-off picked up from the Mexican League, an ex-prospect with a career ERA of 5.5 in his first three years, and the son of one of their former pitchers, a throw-in in a 2009 trade with the Dodgers. They have only one regular hitting over .270, they're missing two-thirds of their Opening Day outfield, and their 20-year-old third baseman started the year at AA. Nate Silver's PECOTA projection system reckoned they'd finish in last place, 24 games behind the Yankees. And tomorrow night, the Baltimore Orioles will play their first postseason game in 15 years. [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Oct 4, 2012 - 87 comments

All Hail Miguel Cabrera -- Triple Crown Winner

Miguel Cabrera has won the Triple Crown. The list of Triple Crown winners is quite short (considering that Major League Baseball is 136 years old). [more inside]
posted by Groundhog Week on Oct 4, 2012 - 273 comments

I'm as high as a Georgia pine.

The Long, Strange Trip of Dock Ellis. ESPN's Outside the Lines has created a digital reading experience worthy of its subject matter. [more inside]
posted by whimsicalnymph on Sep 12, 2012 - 18 comments

FEAR THE ARTICHOKE KING

The History Of New York In 50 Objects (NYT)
posted by The Whelk on Sep 5, 2012 - 29 comments

"For each inch a player grows above 5'6", announcers are 2 percent less likely to praise him with intangibles."

The product of a successful Kickstarter project, a study has been released focusing on subconscious racism in baseball announcing. [more inside]
posted by Bulgaroktonos on Aug 27, 2012 - 72 comments

65-year-old Bill Lee wins game

Bill "Spaceman" Lee wins a professional baseball game at 65. The former Red Sox pitcher and co-author of "The Wrong Stuff" went all nine innings for the San Rafael Pacifics of the North American League, beating the Maui Na Koa Ikaika by a score of 9-4. He also batted for himself and singled in a run. Take that, Roger Clemens!
posted by tallmiddleagedgeek on Aug 24, 2012 - 20 comments

Melky Cabrera Phony Website

"Facing a 50-game suspension for doping, San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera created a phony website and a fake product in an attempt to dodge the ban by proving he inadvertently ingested a banned substance, according to a report."
posted by mr_crash_davis on Aug 19, 2012 - 56 comments

Just in time for Football Manager 2013

As you know, Bob, Bill James revolutionised baseball with sabermetrics, statistical analyisis of how the game is actually played. In football (soccer that is) this revolution is long overdue, as it has largely lagged behind American sports in its use of data analysis. Now however there's a chance for somebody clever to become football's Bill James, as Manchester City is going to release all player data and analysises from the 2011-12 season.
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 16, 2012 - 50 comments

Honestly, you guys, these are *supposed* to be pretty rare...

Felix Hernandez of the Seattle Mariners has pitched the Major League's 24th 23rd perfect game, in a 12-strikeout, 1-0 win over the Tampa Bay Rays. You can watch an abbreviated video showing all 27 outs in succession at mlb.com here (6:08). [more inside]
posted by hincandenza on Aug 15, 2012 - 64 comments

There are still so many mistakes to be made!

Who is the world's greatest athlete? Is it Kelly Slater? Is it Jesse Owens? Maybe. If you ask Josh Wilker, proprietor of Cardboard Gods, one thing is certain, it will be a player from his childhood baseball card collection [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Aug 15, 2012 - 13 comments

Johnny Pesky has left the park.

Johhny Pesky, longtime member of the Boston Red Sox has passed away at the young age of 92. More famous for the right field foul pole named after he hit one of his only 6 Fenway Park home runs as it swung around the pole, the erstwhile manager spent nearly his entire 73 year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox. Much like teammate Ted Williams Johhny left baseball during his prime to fight in World War Two
posted by Gungho on Aug 13, 2012 - 47 comments

Rarer Than a Perfect Game

Tonight, for only the third time in Major League Baseball history, a player (Kendrys Morales of the Los Angeles Angels) hit two home runs in the same inning, one from each side of the plate. Morales' second home run of the inning was a grand slam, his first since the ill-fated events of 5/29/10, when he suffered a freak ankle injury jumping onto home plate in celebration of his game-winning hit, just as his career was really beginning to take off. Morales subsequently missed nearly two full seasons of baseball, returning just this year.
posted by The Gooch on Jul 30, 2012 - 19 comments

"Why the f--- did I even buy this?"

In 2009, Sports Illustrated investigated the strange and perilous financial lives of professional athletes. [more inside]
posted by Snarl Furillo on Jul 26, 2012 - 38 comments

What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light?

What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light?
posted by markdj on Jul 10, 2012 - 108 comments

27 up, 27 down

San Francisco Giants' Matt Cain has pitched a particularly fine perfect game.
posted by anigbrowl on Jun 13, 2012 - 64 comments

That's Amazin'

A group of Kenyan students re-enact Bill Buckner's error leading to the Mets winning run in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. Here's the original play. Previously
posted by exogenous on Jun 11, 2012 - 42 comments

One of 'em Suck!

Former major leaguer and current minor league manager Wally Backman says some very colorful things. The full censored episodes are online (starting with Episode 1: Where's Wally Backman?) Mostly NSFW. [more inside]
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Jun 3, 2012 - 6 comments

No-hitter for Johan Santana!

Mets pitcher Johan Santana has just thrown the first no-hitter in the fifty-year history of the New York Mets.
posted by Fister Roboto on Jun 1, 2012 - 49 comments

The Cup Of Coffee Club: The Ballplayers Who Got Only One Game

Of the 17,808 players (and counting) who’ve run up the dugout steps and onto a Major League field, only 974 have had one-game careers. [...] The Cup of Coffee club is filled exclusively with people who do not want to be members.
posted by Chrysostom on May 31, 2012 - 26 comments

Pitching through pain. *All kinds*.

NYTimes: The Glory and Pain of Pitching. Bobby Ojeda, starting pitcher for one of the greatest games in the history of Major League Baseball, takes us into the mind of the career athlete and his relationship with a constant companion -- pain.
posted by workingdankoch on May 26, 2012 - 15 comments

"Never Be Satisfied"

"I'm just looking for a second chance. Other people get second chances. Alcoholics. Drug addicts. Spousal beaters. Not gamblers, though. But, if you want to put something on my tombstone that was very important to me, it’s 1,972. That’s how many winning games I’ve played in. So that makes me the biggest winner in the history of sports. No one else can say that." Here, Now is a short documentary that looks at baseball legend Pete Rose, as he lives his life today. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 23, 2012 - 45 comments

A Magazine in Nine Innings

The Eephus League presents: a web magazine about baseball.
posted by zamboni on May 23, 2012 - 15 comments

The 1986 New York Mets

"A great ballclub, a beautiful demonstration of what talent can do when assembled with planning and guided by intelligence." - Bill James, on the 1986 New York Mets [more inside]
posted by Trurl on May 16, 2012 - 36 comments

National anthem on an electric violin made out of a bat

If you were watching the Orioles-A's game from Camden Yards tonight, you saw a guy playing the National Anthem on an electric violin made out of a baseball bat. This is how that looks and sounds. This is the guy talking about and showing off his Louisville Slugger violin. And this is the Washington Post profile of Glenn Donnellan, a violinist with the National Symphony Orchestra and the maker and player of the world's only electric baseball bat violin.
posted by escabeche on Apr 27, 2012 - 15 comments

Number 20

Phil Humber, pitcher for the Chicago White Sox, playing vs. the Seattle Mariners, today pitched the 20th regular season perfect game (and 21st overall) in Major League Baseball history.
posted by hippybear on Apr 21, 2012 - 95 comments

"Fenway is the essence of baseball"

Fenway Park, in Boston, is a lyric little bandbox of a ballpark. Everything is painted green and seems in curiously sharp focus, like the inside of an old-fashioned peeping-type Easter egg. It was built in 1912 and rebuilt in 1934, and offers, as do most Boston artifacts, a compromise between Man's Euclidean determinations and Nature's beguiling irregularities. So wrote John Updike in his moving tribute to Red Sox legend Ted Williams -- an appropriately pedigreed account for this oldest and most fabled of ballfields that saw its first major league game played one century ago today. As a team in flux hopes to recapture the magic with an old-school face-off against the New York Highlanders Yankees, it's hard to imagine the soul of the Sox faced the specter of demolition not too long ago. Now legally preserved, in a sport crowded with corporate-branded superdome behemoths, Fenway abides, bursting with history, idiosyncrasy, record crowds, and occasional song. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Apr 20, 2012 - 48 comments

It played ball

Bedridden, bored as all hell, and finally surrounded by a rare quiet, [John Burgeson] thought about the IBM 1620, and how its algorithmic alacrity bordered on self-learning, and realized, maybe deliriously, that the machine had the capability of making a little baseball simulator.
The Lost Founder of Baseball Video Games
posted by griphus on Apr 10, 2012 - 3 comments

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