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It's Family Circus, but about birding.

Birding Family Circus
posted by hydrophonic on Oct 5, 2014 - 54 comments

Chicken or egg? There was no moment when a dinosaur became a bird.

A team of researchers, including University of Edinburgh paleontologist Stephen Brusatte and Swarthmore College Associate Professor of Statistics Steve C. Wang, cataloging 853 skeletal characteristics in 150 dinosaurs and analyzing the rate at which these characters change, and they found that "there was no grand jump between nonbirds and birds in morphospace." In other words, birds didn't suddenly come into existence, but evolved, bit by bit, or characteristic by characteristic. But when birds were finally a thing, they went crazy. "Once it came together fully, it unlocked great evolutionary potential that allowed birds to evolve at a super-charged rate."
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 29, 2014 - 37 comments

I will name him "Puffy"

Petaluma couple rescue tiny ambulatory pom-pom; turns out to be rare shorebird. [more inside]
posted by oneirodynia on Aug 12, 2014 - 23 comments

Knit me a nest

"We use these nests primarily for the song birds," said Alison Hermance, WildCare's communications manager, as she gestured toward a blue knitted nest carrying baby finches and a gray and white nest full of tiny and eager chestnut-backed chickadees, their beaks wide open in anticipation of a feeding. [more inside]
posted by gingerbeer on Jul 4, 2014 - 21 comments

RIP Trampas

Trampas, aka StudBook 424, passed away this week, leaving behind over 770 descendants, at the ripe old age of 13, the longest life known for a loggerhead shrike. [more inside]
posted by gingerbeer on Jul 1, 2014 - 14 comments

Humming Along

Hummingbirds have been slow to give up their secrets, but slowly, we've learned to understand them.
Thanks to a certain resemblance to an insect, the hummingbird is known in French as “oiseau mouche” (fly bird). Its fondness for the calyxes of blossoms has inspired the Portuguese names “beija flor” (flower kisser) and “chupa flor” (flower sucker), and the related Spanish “pica flor” (flower poker). In other languages, hummingbirds are known as “Kolibri,” a word likely of Caribbean origin, or Trochilidae, their scientific name (which was provided by Carl Linnaeus and, curiously, seems to relate to a different bird — a type of kinglet called “trochilus” by the ancient Greeks). These inventive names reflect the wonder and enigma that surrounds these creatures and the peculiar abilities and proclivities that set them apart from other birds.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 20, 2014 - 38 comments

They know when the boxed bird sings.

Vinkensport (finch sport), or vinkenzetting (finch sitting) is a Belgian, primarily Flemish, sport involving a box, a bird, and a counting stick. The bird that sings the most times in an hour wins. Here is a short and somewhat doubtful documentary.
posted by hydrophonic on Jun 4, 2014 - 9 comments

"You've never seen anything like it!"

Bill and Coo Plot: The feathered residents of Chirpendale are terrorized by an evil black crow by the name of "The Black Menace". But to the citizen's rescue comes a brave young taxi puller named Bill! [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 31, 2014 - 7 comments

Of Course

What song do you play when you have a crow sitting on your guitar? Blackbird, of course. (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by tommasz on May 30, 2014 - 36 comments

The goat says "Meh"

Visualize a comic book, in your language, and imagine what would be written in the text balloon coming from the mouth of an animal. Now translate it. Derek Abbott of The University of Adelaide (previously) has compiled "the world’s biggest multilingual list" of animal sounds, commands, and pet names.
posted by Room 641-A on May 21, 2014 - 20 comments

Ech!

Meet the majestic American WoodEch.
posted by Evilspork on Apr 14, 2014 - 12 comments

On Engastration

His recipe calls for a bustard stuffed with a turkey stuffed with a goose stuffed with a pheasant stuffed with a chicken stuffed with a duck stuffed with a guinea fowl stuffed with a teal stuffed with a woodcock stuffed with a partridge stuffed with a plover stuffed with a lapwing stuffed with a quail stuffed with a thrush stuffed with a lark stuffed with an ortolan bunting stuffed with a garden warbler stuffed with an olive stuffed with an anchovy stuffed with a single caper - The Roti Sans Pareil or Roast Without Equal.
posted by The Whelk on Apr 5, 2014 - 70 comments

Charting climate change and local loss of flora from Thoreau's journals

From 1851 to 1858, Henry David Thoreau noted a number of natural occurrences in detail, including the first flowering dates for over 500 species of wildflowers in Concord. Additionally, Alfred Hosmer, a botanist in the same area, had recorded the flowering dates of over 600 species of wild plants in 1878 and from 1888 to 1902. With that data, Richard Primack, a biology professor at Boston University, and fellow researcher Abraham Miller-Rushing spent years aligning old plant names with current names to study the change flowering patterns from the recorded past to present. Their phenological study concluded that plants in Concord, on average, are now flowering 10 days earlier than they were in Thoreau's time (full article for the journal BioScience). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 25, 2014 - 3 comments

Pelican Cam

Somebody put a camera on a pelican's beak & it's awesome!! (SLYT)
posted by The Blue Olly on Mar 4, 2014 - 40 comments

Western Digs: Dispatches from the Ancient American West

Western Digs is a source for "dispatches from the American ancient West." Posts are sorted into three main categories: Dinosaurs & Ancient Life (Paleontology, split into Dinosars, The Ice Age, Birds and All Fossils), Prehistoric Americans (Archaeology, split into Ancient Southwest and The Mississippians [Cahokia]), and Modern Artifacts (Historic Archaeology, including the subset The 20th Century). If you're not sure where to start reading, here are Western Digs’ Top 5 Paleontology Stories of 2013 and Western Digs’ Top 5 Archaeology Stories of 2013.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 30, 2014 - 5 comments

Fish leaps to catch birds on the wing

...a fish grabs one of the famously speedy birds straight out of the air.
posted by Confess, Fletch on Jan 12, 2014 - 33 comments

Great selfie. Not a trace of duckface

Eagle steals a camera that was set up to film crocodiles, flies off with it and transports it over 100 kilometers. The motion-sensitive camera was triggered three times, so we get to see the young sea-eagle fly away with it, setting it down and pecking at it. The camera was found and recovered through sheer luck. The footage is worth seeing.
posted by Too-Ticky on Dec 3, 2013 - 17 comments

Budgies Go Round And Round

Someone in the UK really likes training budgies to ride little rides.
posted by The Whelk on Nov 30, 2013 - 23 comments

Trick or Tweet.

Bird. Here to remind you that Halloween is on its way.
posted by kinnakeet on Oct 7, 2013 - 20 comments

Hello yes this is a bird

I am a birdsrightsactivist and fight against antibird sentiment. tree
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Sep 26, 2013 - 62 comments

The Maleos of Indonesia, birds that can fly from the day they hatch

Megapode, Greek for "large foot," refers to refers to 12 species of Australasian chickenlike birds (order Galliformes), which have small heads compared to their bodies, and large feet. They are also known as Mound Builders, or Incubator Birds, as they bury their eggs in some warm material, most commonly fermenting or decomposing plant matter. But on Sulawesi island in Indonesia, Maleos bury their eggs in sun-baked or volcanically heated sands, then depart. The young hatch from their large eggs (5 times the size of chicken eggs), then dig out of their sandy incubators and walk or fly away. If you can't make it to Indonesia to see the birds in person, you can also visit the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo to see their 9 Maleos, or check out their video about Maleos and the zoo's breeding program. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 10, 2013 - 5 comments

The body will be cremated and the ashes taken to Australia

Tomorrow, the 2013 Ashes series (England verses Australia) begins with the start of the first match at Trent Bridge (Nottingham). Though England and Australia have battled since 1861, the Ashes were first contested in 1882. Australia lead England 31-30 in series victories. England start as strong favorites with the bookmakers. Glenn McGrath cautiously predicts a 2-1 Australia series win, whilst Ian Botham predicts a 10-0 wipeout for England over the two series. The 2013 Ashes will be streamed live to 53 countries over YouTube. With Britain in the grip of unusual summer weather (sun), much play is likely. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Jul 9, 2013 - 127 comments

Feathers, photographed and scanned.

Feathers, photographed and scanned. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by aniola on Jun 17, 2013 - 16 comments

What seems to be the problem officer? I am not a crook!

Disco the parakeet is on a roll with many of his (and possibly your) favorite phrases
posted by Blasdelb on May 10, 2013 - 17 comments

Hope is the thing with feathers

Listening to birdsong is really good for you. But many of us live in urban environments where birdsong is a scarce resource, so you might consider opening up this YouTube audio clip, or this one, or this one, and just let those little birdies serenade you while you work at your computer, or savor your morning coffee, or do your household errands. It's good for the soul.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 26, 2013 - 53 comments

Getting Stuffed

David Sedaris buys an owl.
posted by Artw on Apr 14, 2013 - 22 comments

H7N9: The next pandemic?

Is this a pandemic being born? [Google cache] The H7N9 (Bird) Flu Virus May Have Adapted To Mammals. The WHO is investigating. Four new human cases were identified late Tuesday.
posted by spock on Apr 2, 2013 - 139 comments

Pluck

Prior to their southward migration, the godwits eat up large, until up to 55 per cent of their body weight is fat. They then reduce the size of their gut, kidney and liver by up to 25 per cent to compensate for the added weight. Godwits are amazing migratory shorebirds who travel many thousands of miles at a go. Here's a brief documentary of people studying them (12 minutes on youtube + ad, shows invasive surgery). Here's some science on their flights (creative commons). [more inside]
posted by aniola on Apr 1, 2013 - 6 comments

Shake Shake Shake

1:42 minutes of a crow taking a bath.
posted by The Whelk on Mar 31, 2013 - 66 comments

How “Golden Eagle Snatches Kid” Ruled The Internet

Chris Stokel-Walker of BuzzFeed explains the motivation and technology behind last year's “Golden Eagle Snatches Kid” viral video sensation. [Previously]
Four Canadian film students were assigned a project: Create a YouTube hoax video that gets 100,000 views. They got nearly 42 million instead. Here’s the definitive behind-the-meme look at how—and why—their homework snowballed into one of the most popular and rapidly spread videos ever.

posted by ob1quixote on Feb 21, 2013 - 32 comments

like, it's FROM a bird, but then there's a bird IN it, i don't even--

Cut feather shadowboxes: feather art by Chris Maynard.
posted by cortex on Jan 29, 2013 - 12 comments

Murmuration

Murmuration (slvim)
posted by grateful on Jan 29, 2013 - 4 comments

Birdstep

Bird sings dubstep [slyt]
posted by special-k on Jan 13, 2013 - 29 comments

de Dodo doo, de da da da

More dodos than you can shake a stick at! The Dodo Blog: "The influence of dodos in the modern culture, in other words, a blog about dodos." Continued at The Dodo Tumblr.Dodos previously & previously
posted by not_on_display on Jan 5, 2013 - 8 comments

Hint. It's not sugary breakfast cereal.

'If you’re like me, you’ll have asked yourself many times, “Why do toucans have such ridiculously big bills?”' [more inside]
posted by panaceanot on Dec 20, 2012 - 32 comments

nice try, birdie

Golden eagle snatches kid. (Warning: slow motion section features inexplicable music choice.)
posted by flapjax at midnite on Dec 18, 2012 - 333 comments

smart bird

"Tool use in animals is rare, and bespeaks a level of intelligence that most of us are unaccustomed to associating with non-humans. That's what makes this video of a Green Heron using bread to lure fish to their doom so remarkable. One would be hard pressed to argue that this bird is not thinking critically about the technique it is employing to catch its prey. Not only is it demonstrating logic and reason in its capacity to understand that a piece of bread can be used as bait, it's also passing up the chance to eat the bread in favor of a better meal, actively weighing cost and benefit, pitting immediate gratification against delayed satisfaction. It's a stunning display of animal intelligence."
posted by flapjax at midnite on Aug 27, 2012 - 68 comments

Chicks In Luxury

Petter Lippmann photographs elegant poultry.
posted by The Whelk on Aug 5, 2012 - 27 comments

Doot do do doo do doot do do do dooooo

Kame Chan is a cockatiel that likes to sing. The Chocobo theme! Zelda! Victory!
posted by The Whelk on Jun 22, 2012 - 10 comments

Strawberry Rocks Forever

Those of you who go in for gardening, specifically those with strawberry patches, may find this idea to be of benefit: strawberry rocks. Might just keep those birds away!
posted by flapjax at midnite on May 25, 2012 - 37 comments

A Gull-Eating Octopus in Victoria, BC

An octopus eats a bird.
posted by jjray on Apr 28, 2012 - 77 comments

Red-Tailed Hawk and Great Blue Heron Webcams

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology has set up web cams next to red-tailed hawk and great blue heron nests near campus, with around-the-clock live streaming video. Greatest hits so far include a newly-hatched hawk being fed, and an evening owl attack on the female heron. More exciting than Cornell's recent stinky corpse flower cam. (Note: the gristly thing in the hawk nest is a pigeon killed yesterday that they've been feeding to the hatchling, so trigger warning if dead things upset you.)
posted by aught on Apr 24, 2012 - 22 comments

that's one mellow cat

Little parakeet just won't leave kitty alone. I mean, really. Doesn't matter if kitty is drinking, or trying to sleep. He just won't leave kitty alone. I mean, really. Kitty's cool with it, though, and they enjoy the same food. And neither of them are especially interested in the beetle.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 8, 2012 - 55 comments

A California City Is Into Tweeting—Chirping, Actually—in a Big Way

Lancaster, CA employs an innovative method of crime fighting: bird noises.
posted by reenum on Jan 24, 2012 - 20 comments

Sitting on the old gum tree

Laughing Kookaburra birds: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.
posted by twoleftfeet on Dec 8, 2011 - 16 comments

"The next time you hear a bird chirping outside your window, you might think twice about what’s going on inside his little birdbrain."

Are birds’ tweets grammatical? [Scientific American] But are the rules of grammar unique to human language? Perhaps not, according to a recent study, which showed that songbirds may also communicate using a sophisticated grammar—a feature absent in even our closest relatives, the nonhuman primates. Kentaro Abe and Dai Watanabe of Kyoto University performed a series of experiments to determine whether Bengalese finches expect the notes of their tunes to follow a certain order.
posted by Fizz on Nov 3, 2011 - 31 comments

This post is really only intended for those that can appreciate and afford high quality bird pistols

The Only Pair of Matching Singing Bird Pistols
posted by twoleftfeet on Sep 19, 2011 - 40 comments

Hello Cockie! Whose a pretty bird?

The cockatoos are talking, and they're borrowing our words. Wild cockatoos, native to Australia, have been heard to utter English phrases. Escaped or freed pet birds pass phrases to others as they move up the hierarchy of their flock, as explained in an 8 minute news clip (MP3 linked in the page) featuring an interview with Martyn Robinson at the Australian Museum. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 15, 2011 - 83 comments

Apple Stoer

Blogger BirdAboard discovers not one, but three fake Apple stores in Kunming, China.
posted by bwg on Jul 21, 2011 - 74 comments

The World Record is awarded for Cleanest Floor, not Longest Bird Ball Balance

Here is a video of a budgie attempting to stand on a tennis ball.
posted by BeerFilter on May 28, 2011 - 49 comments

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