278 posts tagged with black.
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We don't know you like that

"However, our race-based skepticism actually makes us nicer. Because of what we see on TV and movies, we assume all White people are one bad breakup or firing away from becoming a serial killer. I know that’s very prejudiced, but just like how your kin clutch their purses when we pass them in parking lots of Target, Black people will be nice to you for the first three months because they want to be the one person you spare when you go on your shooting spree."-The Caucasian's guide to Black neighborhoods
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Oct 19, 2016 - 45 comments

Representation, today.

Today, I bring you a small handful of stories about representation mattering to people. Previously, a story about #toylikeme mattering to those with disabilities. About a black man cosplaying Batman mattering to a fellow-cosplaying child. About finally seeing yourself mattering to inventors of worlds. And a short note about a common experience of mattering in airports to young girls.
posted by TheNewWazoo on Oct 8, 2016 - 7 comments

It’s a river of bullshit and I’ve got no paddle.

Remembering activist Niki Massey (1980-2016). Niki "lived the kind of life that our media and our society like to pretend doesn’t exist; the life of a black, asexual, disabled woman." Her freethought blog, Seriously?!?, among many other things chronicled her disability and her service as a clinic escort. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 2, 2016 - 17 comments

Who Tells Their Story?

"For Asian-American actors, there is a persistent fear of being left out of the conversation entirely, since “diversity” has often been conflated with black representation only. As Hamilton star Leslie Odom Jr. put it, “In America, things get boiled down into a black and white issue, but I want to see stories about Asian people, I want to see stories about trans people — diversity is not just a black and white issue. … We’ve still got some work to do when you talk about real diversity.” (Buzzfeed longform)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Sep 29, 2016 - 16 comments

Why do we dance?

Dance is a language, and social dance is an expression that emerges from a community. A social dance isn't choreographed by any one person. It can't be traced to any one moment. They are as old as our remembered history. In African-American social dances, we see over 200 years of how African and African-American traditions influenced our history. The present always contains the past. And the past shapes who we are and who we will be.
posted by ChuraChura on Sep 28, 2016 - 27 comments

Symbols matter

What I Pledge Allegiance To. "I am a black Mississippian. I am a black American. I pledge to never be passive, patriotic, or grateful in the face of American abuse. I pledge to always thoughtfully bite the self-righteous American hand that thinks it’s feeding us. I pledge to perpetually reckon with the possibility that there will never be any liberty, peace, and justice for all unless we accept that America, like Mississippi, is not clean. Nor is it great. Nor is it innocent." -- Author Kiese Laymon, Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi [more inside]
posted by zarq on Sep 21, 2016 - 19 comments

Many times the tone just simply says, “I do not feel you belong here.”

And Do You Belong? I Do by Solange Knowles [Saint Heron] “It’s the same one that says to your friend, “BOY…. go on over there and hand me my bag” at the airport, assuming he’s a porter. It’s the same one that tells you, “m’am, go into that other line over there” when you are checking in at the airport at the first class counter before you even open up your mouth. It’s the same one that yells and screams at you and your mother in your sleep when you’re on the train from Milan to Basel “give me your passport NOW.” You look around to see if anyone else is being requested this same thing only to see a kind Italian woman actually confront the agents on your behalf and ask why you are being treated this way.” [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 14, 2016 - 16 comments


Black Classical charts the history of spiritual jazz through a 12 hour mega-mix. [more inside]
posted by philip-random on Sep 7, 2016 - 10 comments

All mixed up

What do we call people of multiple backgrounds? Leah Donnella writes about the complexities of naming yourself and being named by others. She also links to Evoking the Mulatto, a project to explore black mixed identity in the 21st century. [more inside]
posted by cubby on Aug 25, 2016 - 10 comments

The movement for Black lives

A Vision for Black Lives: Policy Demands for Black Power, Freedom and Justice. (Platform, Downloads/Briefing)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 1, 2016 - 16 comments

The Florida Highwaymen, Jim Crow era painters who captured old Florida

If you lived or traveled through the Fort Pierce region of Florida in the late 1950s and throughout the 60s, you may have had the chance to buy a landscape painting from an African American man, with Upson board as the canvas and crown molding as a frame, and the paint might have still been wet. Unable to get their art into local galleries, this rough collective of 26 self-taught artists peddled their wares to local businesses, through neighborhoods and to tourists. Their style fell out of fashion into the 1980s, but some of the painters persisted. Their style gained new recognition in the 1990s, a handful continue to paint to this day. They are known as The Highwaymen, and their art captures the natural, and somewhat lost Florida of the past. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 28, 2016 - 13 comments

Some days....

The Bears Who Came to Town and Would Not Go Away. "This is the story of a place at the edge of the world, where a black bear ventured into a Russian hamlet and attacked a human. One bear became two, two became dozens, and before long no one would leave their home, and no one had any idea what to do."
posted by zarq on Jun 21, 2016 - 45 comments

Graduate for Jolley

Last fall, Baltimore's Renaissance Academy High School was put on the school district's closure list for poor student performance, though the decision was later reversed. In November, 17 year old senior Ananias Jolley was stabbed in the middle of science class, and died a few days before Christmas. By the end of February, two more students from the school were killed. 65 students graduated this past Friday from Renaissance; among them Ananias' brother, 20-year-old Santonio Jolley, a dropout who enrolled in Renaissance five days after his brother died. This is Renaissance.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jun 5, 2016 - 7 comments

Our goal is to change the way readers think about the history of movies

In order to expand the discussion of black cinema beyond #OscarsSoWhite, Slate put together a panel of cinema experts and historians to create The Black Film Canon - fifty important films by black directors, showcasing the black cinematic voice spanning over half a century. (SLSlate)
posted by NoxAeternum on May 31, 2016 - 10 comments

The Black Conversation Was Really About Something Much Bigger

Larry Wilmore's ending comment to the President of the United States at the White House Correspondents' Dinner has sparked a lot of conversation. Rembert Browne explores and explains some of the implications and reactions. [more inside]
posted by Deoridhe on May 10, 2016 - 32 comments

Wait for it.

Leslie Odom Jr. Is Not Throwing Away His Shot (SL Longform Buzzfeed)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 29, 2016 - 67 comments

One in five African Americans in Virginia is disenfranchised

...until now? "Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia used his executive power on Friday to restore voting rights to more than 200,000 convicted felons, circumventing his Republican-run Legislature. The action overturns a Civil War-era provision in the state’s Constitution aimed, he said, at disenfranchising African-Americans." SLNYT: Virginia Governor Restores Voting Rights to Felons
posted by Jacqueline on Apr 22, 2016 - 93 comments

modern send-ups of blues tunes transformed into dancing ditties

Black Trauma Remixed For Your Clicks
In viral videos, the real-life pain of black people is repurposed into fun, catchy songs for popular consumption. But at what cost?
posted by andoatnp on Apr 15, 2016 - 25 comments

"As long as she thinks of a man, nobody objects to a woman thinking."

Reader on Revolutionary Feminism "The Revolutionary Feminism reader includes a century of debates between communist, anarchism and radical feminists, extending from 1890 to 1983. Groups in 21 cities and four countries did study groups on the Revolutionary Feminism reader in the fall and winter of 2015. This collection is beautifully laid out, easy to share, and includes a lot of great material on lost traditions of queer and women's liberation movements." From Mefi's own alexkollontai, via MetaFilter Projects. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Apr 13, 2016 - 11 comments

Look for Periwinkle Patches.

The Burial Database of Enslaved African Americans is a project of the Periwinkle Initiative to identify and document often-unmarked cemeteries where the remains of enslaved people are interred. Now "in its infancy," it will aggregate submissions nationwide. People who know of a site can submit it online - an important task given that many are threatened by development and identified by local lore and memory alone.
posted by Miko on Apr 8, 2016 - 6 comments

In the greatest city in the world....

"The statistics tell us that changing the way we think of race and ethnicity in the theater will not be easy. Of Equity’s 50,823 active members, 68% identify themselves as Caucasian." -- Actors' Equity President Kate Shindle, on the Hamilton casting debacle, and the real problem of diversity in theatre. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 8, 2016 - 39 comments

New York Times has a Conversation on Race

A Conversation on Race. With Asians. With Latinos. With Black Women. With Police. With White People.
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Apr 6, 2016 - 22 comments

“It’s a good school. It’s capable of being a better school.”

Price of Admission
Howard University has admitted its troubles. Can it thrive again?
posted by andoatnp on Mar 25, 2016 - 4 comments

There Is Light Here As Well

"Growing up in this home, I was ensconced in blackness — and as an adult, I now see and appreciate the ways that affirmed my identity. I finally saw Ferris Bueller’s Day Off when I was 24, and I was shocked that it was lauded as a 'staple of teen comedy.' I had always thought that the classic tale of Chicago youth skipping class was Cooley High. I didn’t learn whiteness as a default, or the limitations placed on those who exist outside of it, until I was much, much older." Jasmine Sanders (@ToniAliceZora) writes for Buzzfeed on growing up in one of Chicago's poorest black neighborhoods. [more inside]
posted by capricorn on Mar 20, 2016 - 18 comments

Whitewashing the Green Rush

America's Whites-Only Weed Boom.
posted by naju on Mar 17, 2016 - 52 comments

Black hole paint

Artist Anish Kapoor has been granted exclusive rights to use Vantablack, which is so dark it makes everything look two-dimensional, useful for military and space technolgies, as well as making urinal cakes. [more inside]
posted by jeather on Mar 6, 2016 - 54 comments

This feels too much like the late 80s/early 90s

Independent Lens documentary Wilhemina’s War [55m30s]: AIDS is one of the leading causes of death for black women in the rural South, where living with HIV is a grim reality. In Wilhemina’s War, Wilhemina Dixon, her daughter Toni, granddaughter Dayshal, and her 92 year-old mother, all the descendants of sharecroppers, live in South Carolina. Wilhemina cares for Dayshal, 19, who was born with HIV.
posted by hippybear on Mar 4, 2016 - 4 comments

Ya Momma So Black

Ya Momma So Black... [more inside]
posted by cashman on Feb 28, 2016 - 11 comments

"Be prepared to burn."

To Black Girls Everywhere by Linda Chavers
posted by Fizz on Feb 24, 2016 - 5 comments

What It’s Really Like to Work in Hollywood*

What It’s Really Like to Work in Hollywood* (*If you’re not a straight white man.) (SLNYTimes, Interactive)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 24, 2016 - 32 comments

Love, Naturally*

Why Do Black Women In Movies Have To Choose Between A Weave And A Relationship? "Pop culture fronts like black women can’t love both a partner and our hair extensions, but it’s really not that deep." Hannah Giorgis writes for Buzzfeed about the strange movie trope of black women taking out weaves when falling in love
posted by MCMikeNamara on Feb 16, 2016 - 7 comments

CoCo Avenue and Black Musicians in Kpop

When Jenny and Jenna, two Black singers regularly posting Kpop covers on YouTube, found that they were often confused for each other, they decided to band together and form CoCo Avenue, currently the world's first all-Black Kpop group. Other Black Kpop performers include RaNia's Alex, Insooni, Lee Michelle, and Tasha a.k.a. Yoon Mi Rae.
posted by divabat on Feb 8, 2016 - 1 comment

Unpublished Black History

"Every day during Black History Month, we will publish at least one of these photographs online, illuminating stories that were never told in our pages and others that have been mostly forgotten.... other holes in coverage probably reflect the biases of some earlier editors at our news organization, long known as the newspaper of record. They and they alone determined who was newsworthy and who was not, at a time when black people were marginalized in society and in the media."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 1, 2016 - 13 comments

A Reader on Black Revolutionaries in the United States

A Reader on Black Revolutionaries in the United States [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by Westringia F. on Jan 24, 2016 - 5 comments

White ally background material for anti-racism in the US.

Here's a primer for white Americans to learn about race and racism without making their friends/colleagues/acquaintances of color have to keep explaining it.
posted by Stewriffic on Jan 18, 2016 - 14 comments

Why must the Black Mother Courage be delusional?

Actress Tonya Pinkins, on her decision to depart from Classical Stage Company's production of Mother Courage, which was set to open next week.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Dec 31, 2015 - 25 comments

Where "schools aren’t a place to learn, they’re a place to fear."

In 2007, the Pinellas County, Florida School Board abandoned integration, joining hundreds of US school districts in former Confederacy states that have resegregated since 2000. The Board justified the vote with bold promises: Schools in poor, black neighborhoods would get more money, more staff, more resources -- none of which happened. This past August, the Tampa Bay Times published an exposé, revealing how district leaders turned five once-average schools into Failure Factories. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 18, 2015 - 62 comments

AirBnB and Discrimination, Part II

A working paper by three Harvard Business School researchers shows evidence of "widespread" discrimination against African-American guests by Airbnb hosts.

Previously on MetaFilter, a paper by two of the study's authors, Benjamin Edelman and Michael Luca, found a similar effect involving the prices African American hosts could command on the service. [more inside]
posted by kewb on Dec 11, 2015 - 60 comments

The Wiz Needed a Studio Audience

"There's an intimacy to live performance that's removed through the medium of television, and in-studio audiences help restore it. After soaring, cathartic numbers, we need applause breaks. The collective gasp of appreciation when an impressive set piece dazzles, or the murmur of amazement when a section of choreography transfixes are parts of the lived language of musical theater. If you want to make a movie, make a movie. If you want to put on a show, don't play to an empty house." [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Dec 6, 2015 - 38 comments

5 Harmful Myths the Ethically Non-Monogamous Community Needs to Address

Awesome gender-queer Michon Neal address intersectionality and poly relationships. "There are some deeply ingrained myths about non-monogamy that actually exclude many people with varied experiences – especially those of us who have intersecting marginalized identities (minorities of minorities, as I like to call myself)."
posted by stoneweaver on Nov 13, 2015 - 7 comments

reading comprehension and good-old scene analysis

Playwright Katori Hall responds to a production of her play, The Mountaintop where the role of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had been double-cast the role of King with a black actor and a white one.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Nov 10, 2015 - 18 comments

Long live the Blerd!

"Black nerds on Twitter are an eclectic group, into sci-fi/horror/nerdy shows like Doctor Who, The Walking Dead, American Horror Story and Game of Thrones, and they often view the show through a different lens, compared to a non-POC viewer. Blerd Twitter’s consistent viewership and use of blerd hashtags along with network hashtags have made them a prominent source for constructive critiques about television. Hashtags aside, Blerds will give shows a fair shot, but this community won’t hesitate to call series writers and producers out on important issues, like a lack of diversity and/or lax character development for Black characters on the show." How Twitter Blerds are Impacting the Future of TV (by Tai Gooden)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 2, 2015 - 4 comments

The Olivia Pope of Children's Television

From W. Kamau Bell: "First of all, Doc McStuffins is about a seven-year-old black girl. That basically makes the title character the Diahann Carroll of children’s TV. How many other children’s TV shows have a black female lead character? Hint: The answer is “not nearly enough.” Second of all, Doc McStuffins is a doctor for her stuffed animals and toys. And that may sound merely adorable to you, but I’m raising a pair of black girls who will one day be powerful black women. And Doc McStuffins is the reason that my four year old could say the words “stethoscope,” “otoscope,” and “sphygmomanometer” when she was two years old."
posted by ChuraChura on Oct 13, 2015 - 25 comments

"This is not a comfortable conversation."

Michael Twitty is becoming one of the most transformative figures in the world of food. Reinterrogating and recreating African-American history in the context of American culinary history through his blog Afroculinaria, Twitty argues for "culinary justice" in food writing and the conversation on food history. His project (and forthcoming book of the same name) The Cooking Gene is in part a product of his Southern Discomfort Tour, a journey retracing the preservation and transmission of culinary knowledge before, during and beyond slavery. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Oct 11, 2015 - 8 comments

None more black

The Reinvention of Black
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 7, 2015 - 26 comments

Black & White In Color

One of my biggest pet peeves in art is the lazily-desaturated DSLR video. "Black & White In Color" is my personal response to treating black and white as an editing afterthought.
Visual artist Julianna Thomas reminds us that some things really are black and white. (SLVimeo)
posted by Etrigan on Oct 5, 2015 - 31 comments

Meet Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, Black Woman Theoretical Physicist

Dr. Prescod-Weinstein talks about her inspiration, teaching herself what she needed to know, how she keeps balance in her life, and being one of 89 black women with a physics Ph.D., and the only theoretical physicist. [more inside]
posted by Deoridhe on Sep 18, 2015 - 20 comments

One doesnt build a safety net for a race of predators. One builds a cage

In his latest essay for The Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates (previously) examines "The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration." [more inside]
posted by DynamiteToast on Sep 14, 2015 - 37 comments

Calling All Brothers

On August 25, a group of 100 men of color lined up outside Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School, in Hartford to greet and cheer for the children on their first day of school. “In an urban community, people say that black men [aren’t] valued or there aren’t enough black men doing something,” Pastor AJ Johnson explained. “I wanted to prove everyone wrong.”
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Sep 12, 2015 - 9 comments

‘‘I play for me,’’

The Meaning of Serena Williams by Claudia Rankine [New York Times] On tennis and black excellence.
There is a belief among some African-Americans that to defeat racism, they have to work harder, be smarter, be better. Only after they give 150 percent will white Americans recognize black excellence for what it is. But of course, once recognized, black excellence is then supposed to perform with good manners and forgiveness in the face of any racist slights or attacks. Black excellence is not supposed to be emotional as it pulls itself together to win after questionable calls. And in winning, it’s not supposed to swagger, to leap and pump its fist, to state boldly, in the words of Kanye West, ‘‘That’s what it is, black excellence, baby.’’
posted by Fizz on Aug 25, 2015 - 34 comments

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