71 posts tagged with bldgblog.
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PANOPTICOPS

How Aerial Surveillance Has Changed Policing — and Crime — in Los Angeles Geoff Manaugh rides along with the LAPD's Air Support Division.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 28, 2016 - 16 comments

boreal mysteries

In the boreal forests of northern Ontario, aerial photography revealed groups of 'rings' of stunted tree growth. The Ontario Geological Society[PDF] conducted research and found the rings are from 'reduced chimneys' forming enormous electrochemical cells.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 17, 2016 - 19 comments

"It is for her love that we’ve done everything."

"Like grimey servants we followed every new trace that could lead us to her, the aim of our two year quest was always to see the toughest of all the machines. A dormant juggernaut that lies underground. Her name? Iseb, the worm maiden." [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 17, 2015 - 22 comments

the ghost streets of LA

Other times, it actually takes on solidity and mass in the form of oddly skewed, diagonal slashes of houses.  The buildings that fill it look more like scar tissue, bubbling up to cover a void left behind by something else's absence.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 6, 2015 - 31 comments

gentrification, tent cities, climate change, garbage, traffic jams

Grist: Seattle: City Of The Future series includes -
Is Seattle a model for sustainable cities, or just a mess?
In reality, of course, change is a complicated and messy thing. With that in mind, the crew at Grist decided a few months back to use our hometown as something of a laboratory. We abandoned our work stations and set off in search of stories that would illustrate how Seattle is changing, for better or worse, and how the city and its residents are coping. It was a chance to get to know the place better, put our theories and prognostications to the test, and see what lessons Seattle holds for other cities.
[more inside] posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 16, 2015 - 40 comments

Slip, sliding along

The Town That Creep Built
In Hollister, Calif., fault creep shows that no matter what we create the earth will keep on doing what it wants. If we're lucky, our concrete will serve to mark the changes we cannot stop.
posted by dame on Apr 19, 2015 - 31 comments

"In a sense, there is no such thing as healing."

American Mine [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 15, 2015 - 6 comments

‘Yeah, I might die, but it’s a pretty nice way.’

How A Chicago Man Hampered His Own Rescue From The Columbia Icefield, And What Searchers Learned From Him.
When you ask members of the Jasper Parks Canada visitor safety team if they remember the search for George Joachim, a common response is a deep sigh, and something like: “Ah yes…George.” Four years later, the name still conjures head shaking and wary glances. ... Joachim unintentionally misled searchers by listing his destination incorrectly in the climber’s registry, and then behaved so unlike other people previously have in his circumstance that he was repeatedly missed in the search. Parks Canada’s search and rescue community considers his case a valuable learning experience and have since tweaked search protocols to account for other behavioral outliers.
via BLDGBLOG: Algorithms In The Wild
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 1, 2015 - 85 comments

like something out of the Aeneid!

"A new electricity distribution system being described as the "'Hoover Dam' of the 21st century" will bring wind energy from Wyoming to customers in California—and it will get there by way of a $1.5 billion artificial cave built specifically for storing air inside a salt dome in Utah. " [more inside]
posted by xcasex on Sep 24, 2014 - 64 comments

Under the Ground Floor

Rocks Made Of Plastic Found On Hawaiian Beaches. But is it rock, or just fused detritus? Depends on the timescale, similar to how the beaches of Normandy are part shrapnel. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 25, 2014 - 15 comments

It's smaller on the outside - The mechanical furniture of the Roentgens

The mechanical furniture of the Roentgens [more inside]
posted by zamboni on Feb 24, 2014 - 25 comments

Tiny People's Adventures in the World of Food

Dioramas of food and tiny people, courtesy playful food photographers Akiko Ida and Pierre Javelle. Those tiny people are so industrious! More and more of the same.
posted by aka burlap on Jan 24, 2014 - 13 comments

Finance as a novelistic plot engine

An unpublished interview with novelist Sol Yurick by BLDGBLOG's Geoff Manaugh. "[S]uppose we think of The Iliad as one big trade war. Troy, as you know, sat on the route into the Black Sea, which means it commanded the whole hinterland where people like the Greeks and the Trojans did trading. The Trojan War was a trade war." (previously on the 2013 passing of the writer of The Warriors) [more inside]
posted by spamandkimchi on Jan 3, 2014 - 15 comments

"aboriginal landscapes of fabulous hybrid creatures"

Marguerite Humeau is an artist who has made reconstructions of extinct creatures' vocal tracts, extrapolating from extant species and fossil remains. The Extinction Orchestra. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 12, 2013 - 5 comments

BLDGBLOG Books Received

BLDGBLOG has a new Books Received post about the latest books to cross their desk. Previously
posted by Cloud King on Dec 19, 2012 - 2 comments

Christmas Tree Science

Pop-Up Forests and Experimental Christmas Trees
posted by ennui.bz on Dec 8, 2012 - 0 comments

Backup Tut and other decoy spatial

Backup Tut and other decoy spatial: creating a duplicate of King Tut's tomb
posted by Cloud King on Dec 5, 2012 - 8 comments

Lebbeus Woods, Architect

“I’m not interested in living in a fantasy world. All my work is still meant to evoke real architectural spaces. But what interests me is what the world would be like if we were free of conventional limits. Maybe I can show what could happen if we lived by a different set of rules.” Lebbeus Woods, a brilliant, visionary architect, has passed away. [more inside]
posted by Bron on Nov 1, 2012 - 22 comments

"one can quickly find themselves on the wrong side of an argument at a materials handling convention"

The Single Most Important Object In The Global Economy (Slate) [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 22, 2012 - 54 comments

Way down in ...

"The Hole is a small triangle of land divided in half by Brooklyn and Queens, and is located west of the intersection of Linden and Conduit Boulevard. The Hole is literally a hole. It is "30 feet below grade," according to the NY Times, sunken down from the busy roads around it. The neighborhood floods often and is only a few feet above the water table, so its homes are "not incorporated into the city sewer system. They all have cesspools," according to the NY Times. Streets are threatened by reedy marshes, and many residents keep a boat parked in the driveway." It's also home to some stables used by the Federation of Black Cowboys. Brooklyn's Lost Neighborhood [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 25, 2012 - 37 comments

This country will self-destruct in 3 .. 2 ..

"McPhee describes two things: how Switzerland requires military service from every able-bodied male Swiss citizen—a model later emulated and expanded by Israel—and how the Swiss military has, in effect, wired the entire country to blow in the event of foreign invasion. To keep enemy armies out, bridges will be dynamited and, whenever possible, deliberately collapsed onto other roads and bridges below; hills have been weaponized to be activated as valley-sweeping artificial landslides; mountain tunnels will be sealed from within to act as nuclear-proof air raid shelters; and much more." (via)
posted by vidur on Jun 20, 2012 - 100 comments

Books Received

Books Received is the latest post in a series by BLDGBLOG about interesting books that have crossed their desk. Previously: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
posted by Cloud King on Jun 1, 2012 - 3 comments

"I Can Eat 50 Plates Of Beans"

"As such, the film offers an interesting mix of, on the one hand, the surreal impossibility of reasoning with the state and its hired representatives (similar, say, to the writings of Franz Kafka); and, on the other, what seems to be a particularly American breed of libertarianism, one in which even parking meters can be interpreted as 'just a lot of guys laying down a lot of rules and regulations,' where all instances of authority are meant to be, if not resisted, than at least publicly mocked and undercut."--BLDGBLOG weighs in on the classic American film Cool Hand Luke (theatrical trailer). Part of a series entitled "Breaking Out & Breaking In"
posted by bardic on Feb 26, 2012 - 15 comments

Imagine an entire city district dedicated to nothing but ventilating the underworld!

The house Greek Revival subway ventilator on Joralemon Street.
posted by griphus on Dec 22, 2011 - 19 comments

Photo Montages of Tsunehisa Kimura

Tsunehisa Kimura (1928-2008) was a Japanese artist best known for his photomontage art. There doesn't seem to be much about him in online in English, beyond reiterations of the same three images that BLDG BLOG copied from the 1979 book Visual Scandals, and a few short pages that are related to an interview on Australian radio back in 2002. Yet his imagery has caught the eye of various musical groups over the years, including Midnight Oil, Paul Schütze, and most recently, Cut/Copy join the fanclub, with their cover for Zonoscope. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 25, 2011 - 4 comments

Slow Sculpture

Unsolving the city: BLDG BLOG interviews China Miéville
posted by Artw on Mar 3, 2011 - 30 comments

"It's the old houses in Rhode Island."

"I have never done a story in a shopping mall because, even if I'm not drawing it myself, I don't want to see somebody draw a shopping mall." Mike Mignola talks to BLDGBLOG about the influence architecture has on his work. Also includes a link to a USA Today exclusive Hellboy story that appeared previously on these pages.
posted by yerfatma on Feb 9, 2011 - 15 comments

Labyrinthine

Labyrinths – not to be confused with mazes – are being rediscovered as tools for contemplation, meditation, reflection, and community well-being, as well as inspiration for architecture, music, dance, ritual, business, and visual art. [more inside]
posted by velvet winter on Dec 20, 2010 - 19 comments

Offshore Oil Strike!

The thrills of drilling, the hazards and rewards as you bring in your own . . . Offshore Oil Strike. "An exciting board game for all the family." Lovingly brought to you by BP. //BLDGBLOG
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates on Jul 14, 2010 - 15 comments

Julio Dives In Mexico City's Sewers

Good afternoon, my name is Julio and I’m a diver in the sewage here in Mexico City.
posted by Fiasco da Gama on Jun 17, 2010 - 24 comments

Nakatomi Space

Nakatomi Space: On Die Hard, walking through walls, and the Israeli Army.
posted by vronsky on Jan 12, 2010 - 31 comments

A decaying Biosphere 2

Photographer Noah Sheldon documents the collapsing biosphere 2. In case you don't remember it, Biosphere 2 was a terrible disaster - or not. Here's one of the former residents. First link via BLDG BLOG.
posted by serazin on Jan 6, 2010 - 37 comments

One million years of isolation

An interview with Abraham Van Luik, US DoE geoscientist working on the nuclear waste repository under construction in Yucca Mountain. [more inside]
posted by Dr Dracator on Jan 4, 2010 - 32 comments

California "City"

California City is the 3rd largest city in California (geographically), home to California's largest open-pit boron mine, a privately-run Federal Prison, and only 8,835 residents. Originally planned as a "large master-planned leisure community" of up to 1 million people, such growth never materialized, and the remains of the undeveloped streets and cul-de-sacs presage images of the current housing crisis, and are a modern, uniquely American version of the Nazca Lines.
posted by joshwa on Nov 25, 2009 - 46 comments

Long live The New flesh!

"All of which is a long way of saying that, to construct a new church of anatomical horror and to do so out of stone, as Al-Mehdari seems to be suggesting, is a fascinating idea. " - Body Baroque
posted by Artw on Sep 23, 2009 - 24 comments

Saddam's Palaces

Breach. Photographer Richard Mosse's pictures of Saddam Hussein's palaces.
posted by homunculus on Jun 10, 2009 - 11 comments

Evil Lairs

Game developers are unconstrained in their designs for the enemy. Such designers will be punished with poor sales, not death in the gulag, if their designs for the overlord are unpopular. They could go anywhere with the homes of evildoers: halls of electric fluorescence, palaces carved from corduroy, suburban back yards. And yet, in spite of this freedom, most videogame designers choose to make a definite connection to familiar – or real-world – architecture ...
posted by jim in austin on May 15, 2009 - 11 comments

If it's got to be clean [energy] , it's got to be Tide

The Wave Motors of California. "Still embedded somewhere in the shores of California, buried by more than a century of sand, are lost hydroelectric machines." Further reading.
posted by dersins on May 7, 2009 - 26 comments

We are encased in a world of light and cloud

Photos of shadows in the clouds over Austin. via bldgblog
posted by signal on Jan 17, 2009 - 24 comments

Lake Michigan Stonehenge

A year and a half ago, a professor of underwater archeology at Northwestern Michigan University discovered a pattern of stones 40 feet below the waters of Lake Michigan. The story has been surprisingly under-reported, given that the Stonehenge-like structure is potentially estimated to be 10,000 years old. One of the stones even appears to have a mastodon carved on it.
posted by jon_hansen on Jan 5, 2009 - 42 comments

Nuclear Urbanism

Ground Zero. This Google Maps mashup shows the thermal damage caused by various nuclear weapons or an asteroid on the city of your choice.
posted by homunculus on Dec 27, 2008 - 53 comments

Organic Decay

Tickling Thicket: the art of Katty Stone and Yvette Molina. [Via BLDGBLOG and Inhabitat] [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Nov 16, 2008 - 2 comments

Architecture, Sampled And Remixed

Dionisio González makes photographs of imaginary favelas, Filip Dujardin makes photographs of imaginary buildings.
posted by jack_mo on Nov 9, 2008 - 6 comments

Mayan Muons and Unmapped Rooms

Ghost Particles & Pyramids: How physicists and archaeologists “see” inside ancient monuments.
posted by homunculus on Aug 21, 2008 - 11 comments

city of shadows

In City of Shadows, Alexey Titareno uses long exposures to create an eerie effect.
posted by Armitage Shanks on Jun 12, 2008 - 35 comments

magic places

The incredible landscapes of game designer Daniel Dociu.
posted by dhruva on May 5, 2008 - 21 comments

Urban[e] Renewal

Postcards from Our Awesome Future. [via] An art exhibition stemming from the minds of Packard Jennings (whose illustrations have appeared in Adbusters) and Steve Lambert (of Anti-Advertising Agency fame); using San Francisco's infrastructure as a model for improvement, the duo answered the siren call of Objectivism through an arcology devoid of “...budgets, beauracracy [sic], politics, or physics”. [more inside]
posted by Smart Dalek on Jan 8, 2008 - 11 comments

Tomb of tomes

An obscure 1911 British law requires a copy of every published book, journal, newspaper, patent, sound recording, magazine etc.. to be permanently archived in at least one of five libraries around the country. The British Library has the most complete collection and is currently adding about 12.5km of new shelf space a year of mostly unheard of and unwanted stuff. A new state-of-the-art warehouse is being constructed with 262 linear kilometers of high-density, fully automated storage in a low-oxygen temperature controlled environment. It is not a library, it is a warehouse for "things that no one wants." BLDG Blog ponders on what it all means.
posted by stbalbach on Dec 4, 2007 - 60 comments

Bannerman's Arsenal Photoessay

Excellent post over at BLDBLOG on the history of Bannerman's Arsenal, a ruined island castle in the middle of the Hudson river, created by a war profiteer who was at one time the world's largest arms dealer. Bonus points for the amazing accompanying photos by Shaun O'Boyle, whose site Modern Ruins has been featured on the blue previously.
posted by jonson on Nov 17, 2007 - 14 comments

I wanna live in los angeles, but not the one in los angeles

Los Angeles Uber Alles. A passionate argument (by mefi's own bldblog, no less) for why Los Angeles is the greatest city in America. Dissenters, please see the more inside: [more inside]
posted by jonson on Oct 16, 2007 - 284 comments

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