Join 3,377 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

12 posts tagged with bmj. (View popular tags)
Displaying 1 through 12 of 12. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (4)


Users that often use this tag:
alby (4)

BMJ Christmas Edition

Every year the British Medical Journal publishes a special Christmas edition. [more inside]
posted by alby on Dec 21, 2013 - 12 comments

Why?

The world's most extensive study of the drug trade has just been published in the medical journal BMJ Open, providing the first "global snapshot" of four decades of the war on drugs. To sum up their most important findings, the average purity of heroin and cocaine have increased, respectively, 60 percent and 11 percent between 1990 and 2007. Cannabis purity is up a whopping 161 percent over that same time. Not only are drugs way purer than ever, they're also way, way cheaper. Coke is on an 80 percent discount from 1990, heroin 81 percent, cannabis 86 percent. After a trillion dollars spent on the drug war, now is the greatest time in history to get high.
posted by mannequito on Oct 7, 2013 - 96 comments

BMJ Christmas Edition

Every year the British Medical Journal publishes a special Christmas edition. [more inside]
posted by alby on Dec 19, 2012 - 16 comments

To read or not to read

How to read a paper is a series by Trisha Greenhalgh in BMJ, the British Medical Journal, that explains how to critically read and apply the biomedical literature. Deciding what the paper is about. Assessing methodological quality. Statistics for the non-statistician: parts I and II. Drug trials, diagnostic and screening tests, economic analyses, systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PDF), and qualitative research (PDF).
posted by grouse on Apr 19, 2012 - 14 comments

BMJ accuses researcher who claimed link between vaccines and autism of fraud

The British Medical Journal has called Andrew Wakefield, the lead author of the study that initially claimed a link between the MMR vaccine and autism, a fraud. Investigative journalist Brian Deer went through the original medical records of the children included in the study and found that, amongst other things, some of them didn't have autism. Language this strong in a journal like this is pretty unusual, especially given the UK's libel laws. The Lancet retracted the original paper (PDF) last year due to concerns about breaches of research ethics (previously on Metafilter), but the BMJ is claiming deliberate manipulation and misrepresentation of data for financial gain.
posted by une_heure_pleine on Jan 7, 2011 - 120 comments

BMJ Christmas Edition

BMJ Christmas Edition Every year the British Medical Journal publishes a series of tongue-in-cheek papers for Christmas.
posted by alby on Dec 13, 2010 - 8 comments

BMJ Christmas Issue

Every year the British Medical Journal publishes a less-than-serious Christmas edition. [more inside]
posted by alby on Dec 24, 2008 - 11 comments

Science: How About Some Kenny Loggins Instead?

The conclusion of a research paper by associate professor Andrew McIntosh and research assistant Declan Patton of the School of Risk and Safety Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia: "To minimise the risk of head and neck injury, head bangers should decrease their range of head and neck motion, head bang to slower tempo songs by replacing heavy metal with adult oriented rock, only head bang to every second beat, or use personal protective equipment." (Via)
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing on Dec 19, 2008 - 31 comments

Parachutes and the Military Industrial Complex

Parachute use to prevent death and major trauma related to gravitational challenge: systematic review of randomised controlled trials.
posted by sluglicker on May 2, 2007 - 21 comments

You're not going to give me the umbrella, are you?

Sword swallowing and its side effects. The British Medical Journal goes for a bit of holiday levity. Sword swallowing, urethral umbrellas, and more. I am not a doctor, but I play one on screen.
posted by caddis on Dec 31, 2006 - 5 comments

War, what is it good for

War, what is it good for absolutely nothing?. Poverty, political, social and economic inequalities result in war. So whats new.
posted by johnnyboy on Feb 14, 2002 - 8 comments

Hand-arm vibration syndrome may be associated with prolonged use of vibrating computer games.

Hand-arm vibration syndrome may be associated with prolonged use of vibrating computer games. Prolonged in this case means seven hours per day, which seems to be "excessive and exceeds the manufacturer's recommendation." Methinks this is the least of his problems.
posted by gazingus on Feb 1, 2002 - 8 comments

Page: 1