417 posts tagged with cancer.
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"When it comes to left feet, I've got ZERO!"

Josh Sundquist is a Paralympian, a bestselling author and motivational speaker. He lost his left leg to Ewing's sarcoma at age nine and later became a Paralympic ski racer. He also has basketball skills: Scorpion Shot, Alley Oop, Trampoline Shot, Toe Flick.

He has rap ambitions, too. And he finally found his sole mate. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Sep 30, 2016 - 5 comments

Smile! You've got cancer

Cancer is not a problem or an illness – it's a gift. Or so Barbara Ehrenreich was told repeatedly after her diagnosis. But the positive thinkers are wrong, she says: sugar-coating illnesses can exact a dreadful cost
posted by neworder7 on Aug 10, 2016 - 77 comments

Genetic Engineering Will Change Everything Forever – CRISPR

Designer babies, the end of diseases, genetically modified humans that never age. Outrageous things that used to be science fiction are suddenly becoming reality. The only thing we know for sure is that things will change irreversibly. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Aug 10, 2016 - 55 comments

Love, Loss, and Kimchi

" I’d create true fusion one mouthful at a time, using chopsticks to eat strips of T-bone and codfish eggs drenched in sesame oil, all in one bite. I liked my baked potatoes with fermented chili paste, my dried cuttlefish with mayonnaise."

Michelle Zauner writes on how Korean food helped her connect with her mother after her death, winning Glamour's 11th essay contest.
posted by FirstMateKate on Aug 8, 2016 - 9 comments

Hello, my name is...

Dr Kate Granger has died at the age of 34, three years after a hospital stay with post-operative sepsis prompoted her to start the "Hello, my name is..." campaign. The campaign has now spread across the entire NHS, and out of this has also come the Kate Granger Compassionate Care Awards. She wrote two books and a blog, as well as tweeting about her experiences as a doctor becoming a patient, and having terminal cancer. Three days before she died, she hit her fundraising target for the Leeds Cancer Centre. [more inside]
posted by Vortisaur on Jul 24, 2016 - 17 comments

»Mr. Klein wants to keep control over bad stories.«

Christoph Klein, director of the Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital in Munich, is considered an excellent doctor with plenty of ambition. Too much? For years, Klein has been pursuing an experimental study. Several of the children he has treated are now dead.
[more inside] posted by brokkr on Jul 20, 2016 - 9 comments

I'm Just A Person

A couple of days later, I stood in front of a mirror and slowly unbuttoned my shirt. When I looked down, what I saw turned out to be just a flat chest with fresh scars on their way to looking healed. My stitches had dissolved. I took my shirt off and stared at myself, thinking, “Lake was right, I can do this.” - Tig Notaro on luck, love, family, friends, fame, stand up, her new book, and life after breasts
posted by nadawi on Jun 11, 2016 - 11 comments

New mysteries. New day. Fresh doughnuts.

Let these chipper YouTube science vids fill you with existential terror. Popular YouTube education channels CGP Grey and Kurzgesagt teamed up to produce a pair of videos designed to cause you to question everything about your existence.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jun 3, 2016 - 24 comments

inform, but do not inflame

Let Smokers See the Warning They Need [NYT Op/Ed by Joanna Cohen]
Previously: coughin', Warning: Cigarettes are addictive.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jun 3, 2016 - 56 comments

Beautiful and heartbreaking New Yorker photo essay. And fuck cancer.

Portrait of a Friendship in the Face of Cancer [more inside]
posted by nevercalm on Jun 1, 2016 - 9 comments

"I truly believe sunscreen is the No. 1 anti-aging ingredient"

You Know You Should Use Sunscreen. But Are You Using It Right? [SLNYT] [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 30, 2016 - 179 comments

Nothing is straightforward in the cancer world.

More Men With Early Prostate Cancer Choosing to Avoid Treatment [Gina Kolata, New York Times] [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 24, 2016 - 28 comments

But he won't travel long alone/No, not in Fiddler's Green

The Tragically Hip are the most Canadian rock band. They have a new album coming out next month. They're going on tour. And today they announced lead singer Gord Downie has terminal brain cancer.
posted by GhostintheMachine on May 24, 2016 - 92 comments

Everybody dies

Pieter Hintjens is an author and programmer best known as the founder of the ZeroMQ project. He was recently diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of cancer. A Protocol for Dying is his latest and final blog post in which he reflects on how to interact with the terminally ill.
posted by Rhomboid on Apr 22, 2016 - 20 comments

Johnson & Johnson Has a Baby Powder Problem

More than 1,000 women and their families are suing J&J and Imerys, claiming the companies have known of the association with ovarian cancer for years and failed to warn them. The next trial is scheduled to begin on April 11 in a St. Louis circuit court. “Whether or not the science indicates that Baby Powder is a cause of ovarian cancer, Johnson & Johnson has a very significant breach of trust,” says Julie Hennessy, a marketing professor at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management. “In trying to protect this one business, they’ve put the whole J&J brand at risk.”
posted by Bella Donna on Apr 14, 2016 - 39 comments

"What do you plan to do with the wings?"

Rex Ridenoure's sister, LouAnn, a Southwest flight attendant, was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer. "As he waited to board a Southwest flight to see her, partially fearing he wouldn't make it in time to say goodbye, Ridenoure decided he would somehow turn his cross-country journey into the proper farewell celebration she deserved."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 5, 2016 - 7 comments

The moving story behind America’s first penis transplant

A lot more people stand to benefit if the transplant is successful: Though Johns Hopkins is only planning to offer the operation to combat veterans for now, a lot more people stand to benefit. Foremost among them are cancer survivors and transgender individuals looking to gain a functional penis.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Mar 25, 2016 - 19 comments

Rob Ford Dead at 46

Toronto Councillor and former Mayor Rob Ford died today after battling cancer. [more inside]
posted by thecjm on Mar 22, 2016 - 164 comments

Johnny Ramone's last interview

"He's almost a father figure, or a mentor to me," says Robert Carmine, the twenty-one-year-old singer for Rooney, who one night slipped Johnny a demo tape that Johnny liked. "He never had a kid. The Ramones were his baby that he was obsessed with. When he retired, he needed something else to focus on, and that's his friends and his wife. He's given me a lot of great advice: Play to the back row, not the people in front; get a straight mike stand, not a boom stand; own your section of the stage; watch the money; learn what other people did that was cool. He's turned me on to such great old music, like Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent. "He's a much kinder person now than when he was in the band," Carmine continues. "But the thing with Joey is ongoing. We watched the documentary together in his house, and he couldn't stay in the room when they were talking about the Joey stuff. He's still got that pain and anger that he can't quite let go of and become the person he's mostly become."
posted by josher71 on Mar 18, 2016 - 14 comments

Now that's magic

Paul Daniels, internationally renowned magician and television performer, has died aged 77 after a diagnosis of an inoperable brain tumour in late February 2016. [more inside]
posted by NordyneDefenceDynamics on Mar 17, 2016 - 32 comments


Nathan Sexton finished his first half marathon this past weekend in Chattanooga, Tennessee, finishing at a 7:44-mile pace for 13.1 miles. Last summer, Sexton was diagnosed with stage 4 glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer that brings an average life expectancy of 15 months.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Mar 8, 2016 - 10 comments

“So then they understand: ‘If I smell TB, I get food’.”

The rats who sniff out tuberculosis. by Emma Young [The Guardian] The African giant pouched rat can be trained to sniff out tuberculosis more accurately than most lab tests. So why is the medical profession still sceptical? [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 25, 2016 - 24 comments

Who gets scarce drugs?

While Martin Shkreli's decision to raise the price of a cancer drug by a factor of more than 50 has attracted some bad press, another problem plagues patients: drug shortages are forcing doctors to ration access. [more inside]
posted by The Notorious B.F.G. on Feb 14, 2016 - 47 comments

"Death, The Prosperity Gospel, and Me"

An essay [NYT] by Kate Bowler, author of Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Gospel, following her diagnosis with stage 4 cancer. The prosperity gospel has taken a religion based on the contemplation of a dying man and stripped it of its call to surrender all. Perhaps worse, it has replaced Christian faith with the most painful forms of certainty. [more inside]
posted by Pater Aletheias on Feb 14, 2016 - 15 comments

Have You Tried Just Holding Your Breath?

Good news, everyone! Oxygen has been linked to lung cancer. [slnyt]
posted by mittens on Jan 26, 2016 - 51 comments

Cancer and Climate Change

"I’m a climate scientist who has just been told I have Stage 4 pancreatic cancer."
Ex-astronaut and NASA climate scientist Piers J. Sellers compares the long-term prognosis for Humanity and the Earth to his short-term prognosis and decides "I’m going to work tomorrow." Previously, he wrote about the passing of Neil Armstrong and was interviewed about the end of the Space Shuttle program.
posted by oneswellfoop on Jan 17, 2016 - 14 comments

"I don't want to be what's broken."

Jake Roper from Vsauce3 talks about the frustration of recovery, creativity, and limitations. [more inside]
posted by [insert clever name here] on Jan 15, 2016 - 4 comments

“They knew this stuff was harmful, and they put it in the water anyway.”

In 1998, Rob Bilott, an environmental lawyer, took the case of Wilbur Tennant, a cattle farmer who believed DuPont chemical dumping was killing his livestock. Internal documents would reveal that DuPont had known for decades that the chemical—PFOA, used in the manufacture of Teflon—was highly toxic, connected to organ failure, birth defects, cancer, and more. DuPont decided to keep using it anyway. Factory workers were poisoned, as was the water supply of 70,000 people; the scale may be even greater, as “by 2003 the average concentration of PFOA in the blood of an adult American was four to five parts per billion”.
posted by spinda on Jan 8, 2016 - 30 comments

Diagnosing women

A writer for Gray's Anatomy on confronting the doctor who missed her rare cancer. I didn't question him when he prescribed anti-depressants—rather than another MRI—after I confided I was sleep deprived from constant knifing back pain. I convinced myself that his inability to fix me was my failure, not his. I wasn't tough enough. I weighed too much, exercised too little. It was my fault I couldn't walk to the grocery store without a cane and a fistful of Vicodin. He called me "impatient" and "emotional." It never occurred to me that being "female" was perhaps the most dangerous label of all. [more inside]
posted by pie ninja on Jan 8, 2016 - 131 comments

A Father, a Dying Son, and the Quest to Make the Most Profound Videogame

A Father, a Dying Son, and the Quest to Make the Most Profound Videogame Ever: Wired interviews Ryan Green about That Dragon, Cancer, the upcoming game he created about his terminally ill son.
posted by infinitywaltz on Jan 5, 2016 - 16 comments

Man is small, life is large.

Dr. Henry Marsh has performed 400 "awake craniotomies" -- a surgical procedure he helped pioneer -- in which a specific kind of brain tumor that looks just like the brain itself is identified through electric stimulation and removed. Without surgery, 50 percent of patients die within 5 years; 80 percent within 10 years, and the operation can prolong their lives by 10 to 20 years or more. He was profiled in a 2007 documentary: The English Surgeon as well as this article by Karl Ove Knausgaard: The Terrible Beauty of Brain Surgery. Images in some links in this post may be disturbing to some viewers.
posted by zarq on Jan 2, 2016 - 10 comments

Family Secrets and Secret Families: the Hidden Jews of New Mexico

Following the Christian Reconquest and unification of Spain, concluded with the marriage of Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile, the victorious Catholic sovereigns decreed on March 31, 1492 that all Jews convert to Christianity or leave Spain by the last day of July. Whether they stayed or left, many Jewish families continued to practice their faith in secret. Such crypto-Jews passed their traditions down the generations and around the world, some ending up in the Southwest. 500 years later, New Mexico's "hidden Jews" were found among strong Hispanic Catholic communities. Though some were skeptical about the origins of certain family practices, additional research and a pattern of breast cancer lead to genetic testing and confirmation of prior beliefs. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 21, 2015 - 14 comments

To retain the final human dignity of control over one's death.

Dr. Peter Rasmussen: retired oncologist, hospice physician and advocate for Oregon's Death with Dignity law, was given a terminal brain cancer diagnosis in Spring 2014. The Oregon Statesman Journal followed Dr. Rasmussen's end-of-life journey in articles, photos and videos, as he grappled with the same issues he once fought for on behalf of his own patients. Harper's Magazine: When I Die. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 11, 2015 - 5 comments

Of cakes and cancer

After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, a Baking Blogger Uses Cake to Tell Her Story About a year into blogging, one of Sung’s cakes went viral: a cupcake version of the Very Hungry Caterpillar...and Sung’s social media following exploded ...She was even approached by a publisher to write a cookbook. And then..."I felt a thickening of flesh where my breast meets my rib cage, and I was like, ‘Huh. That could just be my rib?’ [But] it turned out that there were two tumors in there.”
posted by Michele in California on Nov 24, 2015 - 3 comments

(gently) break on through to the other side

Toronto researchers cross the blood-brain barrier for the first time. Dr. Todd Mainprize used a focused ultrasound technique, developed with collaborator Dr. Kullervo Hynynen and others, to non-invasively cross the blood-brain barrier to selectively and directly deliver a chemotherapeutic drug to a glioma. (Globe & Mail x 2). "Mainprize says the method could be used for all sorts of brain conditions besides cancer. "There are possibilities of delivering new chemicals and therapies for depression, Alzheimer's disease, stem cells," he said." (CTV) [more inside]
posted by cotton dress sock on Nov 10, 2015 - 10 comments

Cancer Survivors Talk About What It’s Really Like To Have Cancer

In this Buzzfeed video, young cancer survivors talk honestly about their experiences. (SLYT) We all spend our lives wondering what it would be like if the doctor told us we had cancer. How would we react? How would our lives change? In this video young cancer survivors talk with candor and some humor about the day they were diagnosed, and what happened after that. [more inside]
posted by Ursula Hitler on Nov 9, 2015 - 17 comments

Breast Cancer awareness

The American Cancer Society released new guidelines today recommending that women start getting the tests later, at age 45, and only every other year. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 20, 2015 - 17 comments

RIP Carey Lander, keyboardist

Carey Lander, keyboardist for Scottish indie band Camera Obscura, has passed. Carey died of Sarcoma, and she asked everyone to give for those who would come after. She was 33.
posted by Capt. Renault on Oct 14, 2015 - 42 comments

What She Left Me

"They’re such small things —a big toe, an ankle joint—but if they’re yours and they hurt, they become huge. Once it became painful to walk, I found myself wondering if the cancer was coming back, as it can, in my feet, which made me think about the hysterectomy I’d undergone just months before. I found myself thinking, if I cut off my feet, they wouldn’t hurt."
posted by listen, lady on Oct 4, 2015 - 35 comments

R.I.P. Yvonne Craig

Yvonne Craig, perhaps best known as TV’s Batgirl, died Monday at the age of 78 of cancer.
posted by bryon on Aug 19, 2015 - 40 comments

DuPont and the Chemistry of Deception

"In some ways, C8 already is the tobacco of the chemical industry — a substance whose health effects were the subject of a decades-long corporate cover-up." An investigative report from The Intercept examines the secret history of a toxic byproduct of the chemical manufacturing industry that has recently come to light due to a mass of pending lawsuits.
posted by indubitable on Aug 12, 2015 - 31 comments

Remembering Bobbi Campbell

Thirty two years ago this weekend, Bobbi Campbell and his partner, Bobby Hilliard appeared on the cover of Newsweek magazine, most notable because the two men, embracing, were living with AIDS. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 9, 2015 - 16 comments

My Periodic Table

Bismuth is element 83.
I do not think I will see my 83rd birthday, but I feel there is something hopeful, something encouraging, about having “83” around. Moreover, I have a soft spot for bismuth, a modest gray metal, often unregarded, ignored, even by metal lovers. My feeling as a doctor for the mistreated or marginalized extends into the inorganic world and finds a parallel in my feeling for bismuth.
Oliver Sacks on dying. (SLNYT)
posted by gaspode on Jul 24, 2015 - 20 comments

Time for your annual checkup

Dr. Farid Fata, a prominent cancer doctor in Michigan, admitted in court to intentionally and wrongfully diagnosing healthy people with cancer. Fata also admitted to giving them chemotherapy drugs for the purpose of making a profit. The cancer doctor’s guilty plea shocked many in the courtroom, according to The Detroit Free Press. Fata owned Michigan Hematology Oncology, which had multiple offices throughout Detroit’s suburbs.
One of the more horrifying crimes I've heard of. You're welcome. [more inside]
posted by grobstein on Jul 10, 2015 - 86 comments

The first time I coughed up blood, I shook it off.

Medical Fat Shaming Could Have Killed Me Sex educator Rebecca Hiles (Frisky Fairy) details the years of being told to lose weight to deal with her persistent cough before doctors finally diagnosed her with lung cancer. Part I of her cancer story.
posted by emjaybee on Jun 27, 2015 - 184 comments

"I have been given this role. . . . "

Jenny Diski's End Notes A profile of (formerly) Mefi's own, Jenny Diski, and her diagnosis of inoperable lung cancer. [more inside]
posted by jayder on Jun 12, 2015 - 18 comments

"How many Michaels are there in this world? Nobody told me!"

Michael struggles with this sudden loss of privacy. It's too much for him, and he wants to discuss it at the next meeting.

"I don't have time to myself, either, you know," the Replacement says bitterly.

Michael starts to interrupt, but Dr. Kenston reminds him that the Replacement has the talking stick right now. "You've lived a whole life on your own, Michael," it says. "I've never had that. I've never been by myself. Never even existed completely outside of your abdomen."
The New Middle Class, a short story by Dolan Morgan. [cw: body horror]
posted by divined by radio on Jun 9, 2015 - 14 comments

Born from a bruise

Myfanwy Collins writes about her fear of dying, cancer scares and a history of cancer in the family. (SLButter)
posted by Hactar on May 20, 2015 - 5 comments

Cuba has more than sugar and tourism: biotech and lung cancer vaccine

In 1989, Cuba conducted over 80% of its trade with Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (CEMA, or Comecon), but with the relatively abrupt dissolution of the Soviet Union, Cuba was suddenly in a very tough economic position. Over the next years, the country focused on three key economies: sugar, tourism and biotechnology (Google books preview). While the first two seem logical enough, the story of biotech in Cuba, especially Havana at the Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), is getting more attention recently with Cuba's possible therapeutic vaccine against lung cancer. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 17, 2015 - 4 comments

The Friend

"His wife was just thirty-four. They had two little girls. The cancer was everywhere, and the parts of dying that nobody talks about were about to start. His best friend came to help out for a couple weeks. And he never left." (SL Esquire)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on May 11, 2015 - 99 comments

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