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Great American Health Check

The Great American Health Check
Cancer.org has a great online resource to figure out what your individual health risks are, to help get into better shape or to help quit smoking. Its free and kicks out a personalized list of concerns to print out and bring to your doctor.
posted by fenriq on Jan 27, 2006 - 21 comments

Brain Cancer Study

Tin foil hats no longer required! Apparently mobile phone use *doesn't* cause cancer. We'd like to thank the MMF and the GSMA for funding this study along with the EU. I'll still not get one though...
posted by Dio on Jan 20, 2006 - 12 comments

Dogs trained to sniff out cancer.

Dogs trained to sniff out cancer. In this study which will be published in the March 2006 issue of the journal Integrative Cancer Therapies published by SAGE Publications, researchers reveal scientific evidence that a dog's extraordinary scenting ability can distinguish people with both early and late stage lung and breast cancers from healthy controls. A BBC Four documentary will be aired soon in the US, an article and a clip from the documentary can be found here.
posted by Meredith on Jan 12, 2006 - 20 comments

Environmental Causes of Cancer

Environmental and Occupational Causes of Cancer: A Review of Recent Scientific Literature (PDF). There's a summary and analysis of the report in this article. (Via the Organic Consumers Association).
posted by homunculus on Nov 13, 2005 - 5 comments

we menstruate too often

What the co-inventor of the Pill didn't know about menstruation can endanger women's health: "The passion and urgency that animated the birth-control debates of the sixties are now a memory. John Rock still matters, though, for the simple reason that in the course of reconciling his church and his work he made an error. It was not a deliberate error. It became manifest only after his death, and through scientific advances he could not have anticipated. But because that mistake shaped the way he thought about the Pill--about what it was, and how it worked, and most of all what it meant--and because John Rock was one of those responsible for the way the Pill came into the world, his error has colored the way people have thought about contraception ever since."
posted by heatherann on Sep 20, 2005 - 54 comments

Terry Fox

Today, Canadians are celebrating the 25th anniversary of the life and death our greatest hero - Terry Fox. I was only 10 years old when Terry dipped his artificial leg in the Atlantic ocean and began his run across Canada with the aim of raising just $1 for each Canadian. Sadly, he had to end his run after only the halfway point when the Cancer spread to his lungs. Terry passed away less than a year later. Terry Fox runs worldwide have raised exponential amounts more than Terry could have ever imagined. He makes me proud to be Canadian, and I still get choked up thinking about him.
posted by SSinVan on Sep 17, 2005 - 31 comments

Peter Jennings Is Dead

Peter Jennings Dies of lung cancer at 67.
posted by AMWKE on Aug 7, 2005 - 166 comments

One yellow wristband at a time...

"The biggest downside to the war in Iraq is what you could do with the money," he said. "What does the war in Iraq cost a week? A billion? Maybe a billion a day? The budget for the National Cancer Institute is four billion. That has to change... Polls say people are much more afraid of cancer than of a plane flying into their house or a bomb or any other form of terrorism. It is a priority for the American people." Does this sound like the next governor of Texas to you?
posted by docgonzo on Jul 25, 2005 - 108 comments

SMOKING MARIJUANA DOES NOT CAUSE LUNG CANCER

SMOKING MARIJUANA DOES NOT CAUSE LUNG CANCER "Even heavy longterm use"- does not cause cancer of the lung, upper airwaves, or esophagus, Donald Tashkin reported at this year's meeting of the International Cannabinoid Research Society. Over the years, Tashkin's lab at UCLA has produced irrefutable evidence of the damage that marijuana smoke wreaks on bronchial tissue. It is Tashkin's research that the Drug Czar's office cites in ads linking marijuana to lung cancer.
posted by well_balanced on Jul 8, 2005 - 68 comments

Cancer be damned, kids wanna tan

Cancer be damned, kids wanna tan “I know I might get cancer, but sometimes you want to look good no matter what. I’d rather look good that worry about what could happen to me–looks are more important to me sometimes than my health.” (Maclean’s Magazine) Perhaps cancer is ‘natural selection’ at work trying to weed out all of societies undesirables from the gene pool. I for one think we could do without people this stupid.
posted by haasim on Jun 23, 2005 - 72 comments

Eyewitness to History

American's censored Nagasaki A-bomb report unearthed after 60 years: The first reporter to reach Nagasaki following the August 1945 “Fat Man” atomic attack had his newspaper stories censored and banned by US General Douglas MacArthur’s office. The reporter, George Weller, who worked for the (defunct) Chicago Daily News, was prevented from reporting on a mysterious “Disease X” out of fear that the stories of radiation poisoning would horrify the world and shift public attitudes regarding the bomb.

Weller died two years ago. Carbons of the articles were discovered by his son, Anthony.

Four of them were published today for the first time by the Tokyo daily Mainichi Shimbun, which purchased them from Anthony Weller.
posted by zarq on Jun 17, 2005 - 83 comments

Vitamin D is not a vitamin but a hormone

"...but trust me on the sunscreen." That memorable, always-infallible commencement advice (not from Kurt Vonnegut) takes a hit as scientists now propose that we all need to get more direct sunlight, in order to... wait for it... fight cancer!
posted by soyjoy on May 23, 2005 - 32 comments

"I am the only woman in the room with shirt on at the VIP Strip Club"

Showing Off a Little (Inner) Cleavage. Author Geralyn Lucas wore bright, red lipstick to her mastectomy. "It was my way of saying I knew I would still be a woman when I woke up with a blood-soaked bandage where my breast used to be... women have sacrificed breasts and hair to try to save their lives. We have traded in our beauty for some kind of cure. But something strange often happens when we lose the bling — the big boobs and big hair — of womanhood. We're left with what I call 'inner cleavage,' and no plastic surgeon can sculpt it. It is the beauty that exists when everything else has been stripped away".
Lauren Greenfield photographs here. More inside.
posted by matteo on Apr 4, 2005 - 19 comments

Mind if I fart?

Physicians and scientists around the world even go as far as to state that smoking leads to premature death. Don’t we all know someone who smokes constantly, even heavily, yet is still living — or has lived — to the mature age of eighty, ninety, and older? Furthermore, the MDs and PhDs state that smoking causes cancer and emphysema. If this diagnosis were definitive, wouldn’t these afflictions affect all smokers equally, rather than the small percentage that it actually does affect?
posted by Eekacat on Mar 23, 2005 - 78 comments

Oops.

Congressional Copy Editors Needed To Prevent Future Diplomatic Incidents A minor typo in an unofficial transcript at a Congressional hearing a couple of weeks ago caused Sudan to think the U.S. had conducted a secret nuclear weapons test there in 1962. As one might expect, they didn't take the news well.
It snowballed: within a day, the Chinese news service was reporting that the Sudanese government held the U.S. responsible for "cancer spread in Sudan" caused by "U.S. nuclear experiments in the African country in 1962-1970."
posted by zarq on Mar 16, 2005 - 17 comments

Optimus Prime Dies of Prostate Cancer

Optimus Prime Dies of Prostate Cancer "When it comes to prostate cancer, there's more than meets the eye," National Prostate Cancer Coalition CEO Richard N. Atkins, M.D. said. "Often times when one has symptoms for prostate cancer it's already in its late stages, that’s why early detection is so important."
posted by oissubke on Feb 28, 2005 - 29 comments

Christian Charity?

Maggie's Cancer Caring Centres provide beautiful surroundings in which cancer patients and their families can learn to adjust to living with the disease. You'd think an organisation called Christian Voice would support them, but the group instead chose to bully the charity into turning down the proceeds from a gala performance of Jerry Springer, The Opera (which they believe to be a deeply offensive work), pretending to be helping them avoid a scandal, while threatening them with protests outside their centres around the UK.
posted by jack_mo on Feb 23, 2005 - 17 comments

Hooray for HIV!

HIV vs. cancer - two wrongs make a right.
posted by Pretty_Generic on Feb 13, 2005 - 41 comments

RIP Ivan Noble

Ivan Noble has died. In a follow-up to this thread, Ivan Noble has died of a brain tumour, aged just 37.
posted by salmacis on Feb 3, 2005 - 13 comments

Pokemon causes cancer

Pokemon causes cancer. Looks like they're not just limited to epileptic seizures anymore. (via Gamespot)
posted by riffraff on Jan 31, 2005 - 13 comments

Jim Capaldi dies at 60.

Jim Capaldi, legendary rock & roll drummer and Hall of Fame inductee, died Friday at the age of 60 after a brief fight with stomach cancer.
posted by geeknik on Jan 29, 2005 - 8 comments

Ivan Noble's Tumour Diary

Ivan Noble's Tumour Diary The BBC's Ivan Noble has been keeping an online diary of his fight against a malignant brain tumour. Alas, his illness is now getting the better of him, and this will be his final column. He has been, at times, an inspiration, incredibly brave and totally honest about his illness. As a former colleague, he shall also be remembered fondly. Start from the beginning, it's a must read.
posted by scaryduck on Jan 27, 2005 - 10 comments

Cancer, Chemicals and History

Cancer, Chemicals and History. Some of the biggest chemical companies in the US have launched a campaign to discredit two historians who have written a book about the industry's efforts to conceal links between their products and cancer. Some of the internal documents referenced in the book can be found at the Chemical Industry Archives, a site dedicated to exposing the industry's attempts to conceal the dangers of their products. [Via Disinformation.]
posted by homunculus on Jan 26, 2005 - 12 comments

3 young writers achieve acclaim years after their deaths from cancer

Although cancer got these three young writers before their books were published, their now-acclaimed work -- from children's inspirational to humorous fantasy to coming of age (book and movie) -- was brought to life by the efforts of parents or a brother or friends.
posted by escorter on Dec 14, 2004 - 1 comment

Watching movies in a difficult year

On the meaning of life... and movies: The radiation made it difficult for me to handle solid food, and I existed on a product named Ensure, which kept everything humming along. Very early on the first morning in Cannes I woke early, as I always do, and wandered, as I always do, down to the all-night cafe by the port, and ordered, as I always do, a croissant and cafe au lait. I dunked the croissant into the coffee, as I always do, and ate it, and that was the beginning of real food again.

Roger Ebert describes his battles with cancer--and his love of movies--in the introduction to his 2005 Movie Yearbook.
posted by Faint of Butt on Dec 2, 2004 - 25 comments

This CEOs Broken As Well, Can We Have Another?

McDonalds CEO "Flipping Burgers at 15" Quits Due To Colorectal Cancer You know, losing one CEO to coronary heart disease is unfortunate. However, losing another to colorectal cancer just seems careless. An increased occurrence of both diseases is linked with the consumption of red meat, especially processed red meat cooked or seared at high temperatures. Not exactly a good advertisement for McDonalds. Maybe it's time to recruit some people who haven't been enjoying the free employee meals quite so much?
posted by meehawl on Nov 23, 2004 - 64 comments

Mom's Cancer

Mom's Cancer. "My mother was diagnosed with incurable lung cancer. I made a comic strip about it."
posted by Johnny Assay on Nov 20, 2004 - 60 comments

Blinded By Science

Blinded By Science: How `Balanced' Coverage Lets the Scientific Fringe Hijack Reality. How and why the media has failed so completely to educate the American public on the massive environmental dangers we face. (via WorldChanging)
posted by stbalbach on Nov 11, 2004 - 11 comments

Breast Cancer

Talk about having a bad day: On the same day that she found out her husband was out of a job, Elizabeth Edwards found out she had breast cancer.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy on Nov 4, 2004 - 16 comments

Stem cells target cancer tumors

Stem cells target cancer tumors. There has been some promising research with embryonic and adult stem cells in the fight against cancer. Meanwhile, California approved $3 billion for stem cell research, good news (debatably) since the 22 stem cell lines available for federally-funded research are contaminated with mouse cells and unusable for treatment in humans, but I wonder if California might end up in a federalism showdown with the new Senate over this. Maybe it will be less of an issue now that researchers have figured out how to derive stem cells from a morula, a four-day old embryo, without destroying it.
posted by homunculus on Nov 3, 2004 - 10 comments

Supreme Court Judge Hospitalized - ThyroidFilter

Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist has been hospitalized for treatment of thyroid cancer. Doctors expect to release the 80 year old chief justice later this week. Rehnquist had a tracheotomy on Sunday after being admitted to Bethesda on Friday. More coverage abounds.
posted by bshort on Oct 25, 2004 - 22 comments

Take That, Cancer!

Ben's Game. A young cancer patient, Ben Duskin, designed a video game, a LucasArts developer built it for him. The game follows a young protagonist as he searches for protection from the debilitating side effects of chemotherapy.
posted by o2b on Jul 1, 2004 - 19 comments

Like goatse, only safe for work

Check out the giant cancer fighting colon... of science! "It's part of a national tour to educate people about various types of common and preventable cancers. The 'Check Your Insides Out -- Top to Bottom' tour is full of interactive educational exhibits on colon, lung, oral, breast, prostate and skin cancers."
posted by ilsa on Jun 24, 2004 - 4 comments

Poison and Profits

Ling Chan gave up everything to come to America. "Chan arrived in the United States with no knowledge of English, no support network, and a dependent child...she was happy to land a janitorial job with AXT Inc., a Fremont, California semiconductor manufacturing firm...on a four-person cleaning crew, scrubbing the boxes used to ship semiconductor wafers around the factory...after a few weeks, her colleagues -- mostly Chinese immigrants, like herself -- whispered that this was no ordinary dust: It could give you cancer." [via Fark, of all places]
posted by mr_crash_davis on May 8, 2004 - 17 comments

........ .........

Scientists have created a miniature medical computer out of DNA that can detect cancer genes in a test tube and respond by releasing a drug. However, an injectable version [of the nanoscale robots] would have to work inside cells, and that accomplishment could take decades. Says Shapiro: "I'm not sure it will be within my lifetime."
posted by mcgraw on May 5, 2004 - 11 comments

Lung cancer 'different in women'

Lung cancer 'different in women' Rates of lung cancer in women have increased significantly in recent decades while those for men have remained stable. Female smokers have a greater chance of developing lung cancer, and a higher risk of developing adenocarcinoma, which is the most common form of the disease. But women also have better survival rates, the researchers said.
posted by mcgraw on Apr 14, 2004 - 3 comments

Good News

Frequent sexual intercourse and masturbation protects men against prostate cancer. From the article: "The good news is it is not related to an increased risk…"
posted by mcgraw on Apr 6, 2004 - 31 comments

cancergiggles

Cass is dying of colon cancer, and he is telling us all about it in his beautiful, witty and absolutely inspiring blog.
posted by Fat Buddha on Apr 6, 2004 - 11 comments

Fuck Cancer

Fuck Cancer. Win Prizes. [possibly nsfw. photo has the word fuck in it.]
posted by dobbs on Mar 9, 2004 - 6 comments

Oral Sex Linked to Oral Cancer

Oral Sex Link to Mouth Cancer
"Although the risk is small and it is more likely to result from heavy drinking and smoking, scientists have uncovered evidence that oral sex can cause mouth cancer."

Bummer.
posted by fenriq on Feb 25, 2004 - 43 comments

Cure for Cancer: 72 hours of sex!

Cure for Cancer: 72 hours of sex! A leading tantric sex guru who says he has counseled Whitney Houston, Princess Diana and Michael Jackson claims he "heals" women of terminal diseases such as cancer by sleeping with them -- 2,000 of them in 40 years, and his wife doesn't mind.  
posted by Slagman on Feb 2, 2004 - 14 comments

Comedy = Tragedy + Distance

To say that The Conqueror, the Howard Hughes-backed film about Ghengis Kahn with John Wayne as the lead, is an awful film is somewhat of an understatement. Bad acting in the hot Nevada desert surrounded by radiation from the Yucca Flats lead to around 90 people getting cancer and 30 dying from it. They even shipped radioactive sand back to Hollywood for extra scenes. Lost in La Mancha doesn't seem so bad in retrospect.
posted by destro on Dec 18, 2003 - 5 comments

When health takes a back seat to ... taste?

We already knew that frequent masturbation might cut prostate cancer risk. But it turns out that this is not a message fit for American families. The details of the Lewinsky episode splattered across front pages of the US and abroad come to mind, but also Nancy Reagan pleading for stem research.
posted by magullo on Sep 8, 2003 - 90 comments

Sponsor Seth's

Sponsor Seth's ride for cancer in the PMC Seth Dillingham, a weblogger and creator of the Free-Conversant weblogging service, has been training for months to ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge this weekend. The PMC hopes to raise $16 Million for the Jimmy Fund in support of cancer research and treatment. 4000 riders are registered to ride the approximately 200 mile route, and each rider needs a $2500 sponsorship to qualify for the ride. Seth needs about $750 more to qualify, but there are only a few days left to raise this amount. Please donate!
posted by jroepcke on Jul 29, 2003 - 5 comments

Pinholin' His Way Through Cancer

A pinhole photography buff documents his second cancer experience. The straightforward narrative is very striking, and the photos, while sometimes off the strict topic, build a picture of a real person.
via Harrumph
posted by o2b on Jun 18, 2003 - 6 comments

Northern Magic

Diane Stuemer, an Ottawa area entrepreneur, and her husband reevaluated their priorities in the early 90's after Diane was diagnosed with malignant melanoma and her husband had a work related accident. After her cancer went into remission, and fearful that her 3 children would grow up without remembering her, the family took the bold decision to pack up everything and circumnavigate the world. Despite having less than 4 days of sailing experience, the family took to the seas with great enthusiasm.

The Northern Magic became the Steumer's home for 4 years as they travelled around the world. During that time Diane wrote a series of weekly dispatches to the readers of her hometown's newspaper. It became a tradition in many Ottawa households to read Diane's column in the saturday paper while dreaming of the exotic locals she was writing about (a sharp contrast from Ottawa's winters).

In those 4 years, readers got to experience Herbert (the husband) become a master mechanic, Diane adapt to life afloat, and the 3 sons grow up. When the Stuemers finally arrived home in Ottawa in August of 2001 they where greeted by thousands of well-wishers.

Sadly, Ottawa residents learned early in February that Diane had been readmitted to hospital where she was fighting a very aggressive melanoma battle. Today, Diane succumbed to her illness and passed away.

During their voyage, the entire family took on several projects in the countries they visited which are still active today. What amazes me about Diane is the experiences she lived through with her children, the memories they will cherish and the lasting effect their travels will have on the people they met.
posted by smcniven on Mar 15, 2003 - 19 comments

Worlds Longest Hockey Game

The worlds longest hockey game came to an end this afternoon after 80 hours of ice time. 39 players (all with ties to cancer through loved ones lost or afflicted) participated to raise money for pediatric cancer research. What lengths would you go to for your cause?
posted by Starchile on Feb 16, 2003 - 7 comments

kids these days

On top of being a teenager, on top of surviving cancer, on top of losing a leg to that cancer, 13-year-old Lacey Henderson, formerly of East Denver's Hill Middle School, had to suffer death threats and epithets because of her condition. This is just sick.
posted by donkeyschlong on Feb 9, 2003 - 55 comments

can a screensaver find the cure?

Oxford University is looking to take advantage of distributed computing to find a cure for smallpox. Much like SETI@Home, the Smallpox Protection Project and Oxford's effort to cure cancer rely on individual computer users to download and run screensaver software to crunch numbers in an effort to speed up processing of large amounts of data. How will this kind of initiative impact science in the future? Can we, by volunteering our processors, be part of the quest for a cure?
posted by greengrl on Feb 5, 2003 - 19 comments

The Worrier King

Warren Zevon, one of the best damned songwriters I've ever heard, patron saint of many famous curmudgeons, and a real cool SOB in his own right, turns 56 today.

Last September, he was told he had inoperable lung cancer, and so he's living out his remaining years in the studio, recording as much as he can. I for one am glad he's got at least one more album in him. Is there a moral to this tale? Enjoy every sandwich.
posted by chicobangs on Jan 24, 2003 - 16 comments

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