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delmoi (2)

CRAPCHA

CRAPCHA CRAPCHA stands for Completely Ridiculous And Phony Captcha that Hassles for Amusement. It doesn't keep spammers out. It doesn't crowdsource book scanning either. CRAPCHA's only job is to baffle users, and you can add it to your site today. [via mefi projects]
posted by xingcat on Apr 28, 2013 - 28 comments

The Economics of Spam

A paper from Justin M. Rao and David H. Reiley in the Journal of Economic Perspectives (full-text pdf) about spam economics. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Mar 16, 2013 - 7 comments

How does that make you feel?

Civil Rights CAPTCHA is unique in its approach at separating humans from bots, namely by using human emotion. This enables a simpler and more effective way of keeping sites spam free as well as taking a stand for human rights.
posted by mahershalal on Oct 7, 2012 - 107 comments

Luis von Ahn's Duolingo - translate the web

Luis von Ahn has spoken about the idea of Human Computation in the past, he's the guy who created ReCAPTCHA's, using those anti-spam tests to help decipher digitized books. Now he has a new idea, Duolingo - learn a language for free while helping to translate text from the web.
posted by stbalbach on Jun 20, 2012 - 19 comments

FFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUU-

Social news site Reddit recently held their "Best of Reddit 2010" awards honoring key players in the site over the last year, including the progenitor of the Rally to Restore Sanity, the clever drive-by cartoonist Sure_Ill_Draw_That, unofficial image host Imgur, and feel-good story of the year "Today you, tomorrow me." But perhaps most interesting was the winner for Best Big Community: FFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUU! Originally inspired by 4chan's popular Rage Guy meme, F7U12 (for short) is a clearinghouse for user-made web comics, slice-of-life affairs that tell a story or share a common frustration using a small collection of crudely drawn yet highly evocative facial expressions. Several have become small memes in their own right -- the wily Trolldad, the doormat Okay, the prideful Fuck Yea, the melodramatic Gasp. And one comic, inspired by the warped text randomly generated by reCAPTCHAs (previously), has given us Lord Inglip -- god of a dark religion now rivaling FSM whose cryptic commands marshal loyal armies of gropagas, falcows, Sellicks, and... canary into exploits both monstrous and inconvenient (timeline, wiki). Obey him -- or else! More fun with F7U12: rage face origins, rage faces in real life, Twitter feed, search comics, create your own (alternate).
posted by Rhaomi on Feb 8, 2011 - 168 comments

Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart

CAPTCHA comics: for when typing two words just isn't enough. [more inside]
posted by Rinku on Sep 4, 2010 - 45 comments

Recaptcha

Every day tens of millions of "captchas" are solved by humans, using undreds of thousands of man-hours of work. But what if those person hours could be used for something beneficial? They can be. (you may have noticed recaptcha being used on some notable sites)
posted by delmoi on Nov 8, 2007 - 23 comments

A CAPTCHA for Internet Access

A CAPTCHA to weed out certain potential users of the internet.
posted by exogenous on Apr 4, 2007 - 76 comments

I for one welcome our self aware spam bot overlords.

breaking CAPTCHAs. In this case the programmers were able to use software they had already designed to analyze images of people.
posted by delmoi on Jan 31, 2005 - 33 comments

Captcha

CAPTCHA is the Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart. The test promises to keep online polls honest, block search engine bots, and end spam as we know it. The program generates and grades tests that (1) most humans can pass and (2) current computer programs can't pass. For example, humans can read distorted text but current computer programs can't. To see if you're human or not, take a Captcha test yourself here. To read more check out this nytimes article.
posted by josephtate on Dec 10, 2002 - 27 comments

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