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charming dancing duo morph

Pas a Deux - award-winning 1988 animated short of pop culture icons dancing. A collaboration between Gerrit van Dijk en Monique Renault. Via Your Daily Cartoon (via Mefi's own) [more inside]
posted by madamjujujive on Jul 13, 2014 - 2 comments

The Honey Makers

F.D.R 's New Deal explained to the public via cartoons, shorts, and newsreels
posted by The Whelk on Jun 12, 2014 - 7 comments

Headless Drummer

Animations by David Shrigley. [more inside]
posted by roll truck roll on Jun 1, 2014 - 3 comments

SpongeBob And The Ice King - One And The Same

You may or may not be aware that voice actor Tom Kenny performs as both the Number One Employee at the Krusty Krab, SpongeBob SquarePants, and the nemesis of Finn and Jake, the Ice King. It is a strange nexus between the two shows, which otherwise come from very different imaginations and sensibilities. A 2012 article from the cartoon insider magazine Hogan's Alley spoke with many of the people involved in the creation of SpongeBob, while today The Awl featured this extended look at the creative forces behind Adventure Time, which can be read in full here.
posted by briank on Apr 15, 2014 - 49 comments

The refreshment stand is closed forever

Here are some compilations of old drive-in theater intermission shorts, obsolete advertising for vanished venues. Won't you please visit our celestial snack bar? The show starts in ∞ minutes. Hover over links for more detail.
1 (10m, corn dogs, Dairy Queen) - 2 (10m, Butch, Eskimo Pie) - 3 (7m, public displays of affection) - 4 (3m, cable TV)
5 (10m, PSAs) - 6 (10m, performing food!) - 7 (9.5m, racist indians, snack bar gnomes) - 8 (10m, Jay Ward-like cartoon roundup)
9 (4m, daylight savings time) - 10 (13m, shrimp rolls, local ads) - 11 (10.5m, Dr Pepper robbery, conformity, PSAs) - 12 (14m, Creepy the Clown and "Dutch Treete")
13 (10m, Optigan music spectacular!) - 14 (2m, EAT CANDY BARS) - 15 (9m, Swiss people are magical) - 16 (5m, assorted animation)
17 (17m, Snacks in Space) [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Mar 15, 2014 - 48 comments

CG Mockbusters

The Asylum gets all the attention (and the lucrative gig filling time for "SyFy") but they're far from the only company out there making "mockbusters," those ultra low budget, direct-to-DVD movies named similar to big Hollywood blockbusters, in the hopes that an inattentive purchaser will buy their movie in the hopes they're getting something better. But The Asylum's not the only ones making them, and a prominent mockbuster subgenre is that of companies making really poor CG movies that resemble Pixar and Dreamworks hits only to the extent that they can maintain plausible, legal deniability, their profit margins relying on clueless grandparents getting something nice for the little ones.

Two of these companies are Video Brinquedo (trailer for their Little & Big Monsters and some clips from its sequel) and Spark Plug Entertainment (trailer for An Ant's Life). Far more of their output, including whole movies, awaits you than you could ever hope to stomach.... [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Feb 26, 2014 - 35 comments

An Observer's Guide To Pony Fanwork

How much My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic fan content is there out there? LET'S FIND OUT. A few highlights:
What I Learned Today, morals to episodes
Twilight adjusts to a Season 3 plot development
Apogee, random, catchy
Celestia and Luna play Resident Evil 4 (repurposed from Two Best Friends)
The best of Sweetie Bot, from Friendship is Witchcraft
Slice of Life, a very well done fan Tumblr
How much more could there be? Well.... [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Jan 23, 2014 - 126 comments

במבי

Bambi's Jewish Roots [more inside]
posted by overeducated_alligator on Dec 4, 2013 - 17 comments

I’ve Created a Muenster

The Bob's Burgers Experiment is a blog that documents one guy's ongoing attempt to devise recipes for and cook every pun-laden Burger of the Day featured on the show.
posted by schmod on Dec 3, 2013 - 55 comments

Mickey Mouse and friends, brought back to the 1930s era sense of humor

Mickey Mouse in Ghoul Friend is a new Disney short, featuring the reanimated corpse of Goofy. With this information, you might get the idea that this is not what you might expect from modern Disney cartoons, and you'd be right. It's one of 19 new shorts that are part of the new Mickey Mouse series of shorts that are inspired by the 1930s era Disney shorts. If you'd like to see more, 11 of the shorts are currently available to view on YouTube (in a playlist with two bonus behind the scenes clips), from the DisneyShorts YouTube acccount. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 19, 2013 - 33 comments

Danger is his first name

Danger Mouse (previously), Count Duckula, and Victor and Hugo were three of the many very silly, very British cartoons created by the Manchester-based Cosgrove Hall animation studio. First airing in the 1980s and early '90s, each of the shows were chock-full of wordplay, bad puns, absurd humour, and general zaniness. The studio stopped making original shows after being sold off by its parent company in 1991, and eventually shut down in 2009. The BBC recently covered the history of Cosgrove Hall in a short article and a much longer 30-minute radio tribute by David Jason, voice of Danger Mouse himself (as well as Count Duckula, Hugo, and many other characters). [more inside]
posted by narain on Oct 13, 2013 - 55 comments

Catch the action, guess the mystery on my show. The best show: Mr. T.

"Listen up. This is Mr. T. I pity the fool who misses my show. I pity him!" These words began about half of the episodes of Mr. T, the animated series. It was part Scooby Doo, part A-Team, and part American Anthem. But whatever it was, it was thoroughly 1980s, and its entire 30 episode run can be found below the fold. Each show featured a live action lead-in to that week's mystery, in which Mr. T. and his globetrotting, crimesolving band of child gymnasts brought down another bad guy. Following each show was another live action segment imparting a moral lesson. So, it looks like you have a few seasons to catch up, doesn't it? [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Oct 12, 2013 - 98 comments

Edgardo in: "Kicked out of Cookies"

Cartoonists Lance King and Edgardo George animate a true tale of a night on the town gone disgustingly wrong. [more inside]
posted by overeducated_alligator on Aug 7, 2013 - 9 comments

Xtranormal gets X'ed out

Xtranormal (previously on Metafilter) is the animation website that launched with the slogan, "If you can type, you can make movies." Millions of cartoons were produced, and a few of them were very popular. The software was even used to create animation for TV shows (such as a recurring segment on Fox's Red Eye with Greg Gutfeld) and commercials. But in recent months, the company made a series of controversial decisions and began showing clear signs of trouble. They stopped allowing users to monetize their videos on Youtube. They stopped posting new assets, shut down their user forum and blog, and frustrated users by becoming increasingly non-communicative. The site was hit with serious technical problems that made publishing movies almost impossible, and these issues went unfixed for months. Finally, on June 28th, the company announced that it was shutting down the site. "As of July 31, 2013," reads an announcement on the company's Facebook page, "Xtranormal will be discontinuing current subscriptions, points plans and existing services. Please use your existing XP points and publish and download your movies before that date." Strangely, there has been very little coverage of the site's imminent demise. [more inside]
posted by Ursula Hitler on Jul 30, 2013 - 54 comments

Journey into Mystery

Why the Venture Bros. creators want you to know nothing about Season 5. Not sure what happened in the last 4 seasons? The story so far (video).
posted by Artw on May 31, 2013 - 181 comments

Chinese landscape painting animation of the 1960s

During the 1960s, the Shanghai Animation Studio (perhaps most famous for their classic interpretation of the Monkey King story, 大闹天宫 "Uproar in Heaven", also called "Havoc in Heaven") produced some beautiful, lyrical short films in a traditional Chinese ink painting style. Mostly wordless and featuring a mix of Western and traditional Chinese music, many of the films are available on YouTube: [more inside]
posted by jiawen on Apr 6, 2013 - 11 comments

Car-toons, with the emphasis on 'Car'

Cartoon Brew's animation historian Amid Amidi posted an almost-definitive collection of Automobile-themed cartoons from the 1950s and 1960s. [more inside]
posted by oneswellfoop on Jan 17, 2013 - 6 comments

The Twelve Months, Lolo the Penguin, and other Soviet winter animation.

Today is, of course, December 31st, the new year's eve. And tomorrow will be December 32nd, the day after — December 33rd, and so on, until someone brings me a basket of blooming snowdrops. [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on Jan 13, 2013 - 11 comments

No high fives!

A surprisingly comprehensive animator's guide to King of the Hill. Including: drawing mouths, scenery, lighting, shot composition and other minutiae.
posted by codacorolla on Jan 6, 2013 - 61 comments

My father didn't fight in the Clone Wars. He was a navigator on a spice freighter.

The Best Of Star Wars: Clone Wars - The CGI Star Wars spin off that made the franchise fun again for young and old reached it's 100th episode today.
posted by Artw on Jan 5, 2013 - 35 comments

RIP, Lucille Bliss: Voice of Smurfette and Crusader Rabbit

'TV historians will tell you that “Felix the Cat” was one of the first images ever broadcast on television (when RCA broadcast a Felix doll in 1928 on experimental station W2XBS) — but it wasn’t until the late ’40s that the first animated character was created expressly for TV. Crusader Rabbit appeared for the very first time on KNBH (Los Angeles) on August 1, 1950, and featured a Don Quixote-like title character aided by his friend Ragland T. “Rags” Tiger as they pursued adventures in serial (i.e. cliffhanger) installments.' On November 8th, the voice of Crusader Rabbit, Lucille Bliss, passed away at the age of 96. Ms. Bliss may be more familiar to younger fans as the voice of Smurfette, from The Smurfs, or as Ms. Bitters on Invader ZIM. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Nov 15, 2012 - 18 comments

Hamish Steele!

Hamish Steele! Be moved by his brief-yet-poignant award-winning animated film The Right Time. Be charmed by his commissioned portraits of couples and their pets. Be inspired by his loose and fresh superheroes (Batman, Phoenix, Hawkeye)! And it wouldn't be Tumblr without an appearance by Sherlock Holmes (not that one).
posted by overeducated_alligator on Nov 13, 2012 - 4 comments

Captain Pronin Superstar!

Captain Pronin! An early '90s Russian parody of '80s American action heroes. [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Oct 9, 2012 - 13 comments

"Iwerks is Screwy spelled backwards" -- Chuck Jones

"Over the years in animation, there have been a lot of great animators. Ub Iwerks was one of those people. We know his work, but we don't necessarily know the man." The Hand Behind the Mouse: The Ub Iwerks Story (in 5 parts on DailyMotion: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) tells of the life of Ubbe Eert Iwerks, from the formation of the friendship with Walt Disney when they met at advertisement studio in Kansas City, their artistic collaborations and Ub's 20 years of animation, to Iwerk's technical creations that kept Disney animated pictures ahead of other studios. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 31, 2012 - 14 comments

Get ready for adventure, in the exciting stories of Colonel Bleep!

The first color cartoon came out in 1957, from the Miami, Florida studio Soundac, beating out LA-based Hanna-Barbera's The Ruff & Reddy Show by a few months. Soundac's Colonel Bleep was styled after space-age design ideas of the era, featured in three to six-minute long segments with limited animation, designed for syndication into local kids shows with live hosts. Of the 104 episodes, less than half survive, as most of that and other Soundac material was stolen from a studio van in the ’70s, when the studio was closing. Luckily, episodes have been found in the collections and archives of various TV studios, so Col. Bleep and his side-kicks Squeek and Scratch are available online (YT), some clips on Archive.org, and more on YouTube (playlist with 43 clips).
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 27, 2012 - 20 comments

Tuesday. Africa. Lion o'clock.

Every child comes equipped with
(Whether it's a boy or girl)
A big serving of explosives
Might be up to half a pound
They must be in constant motion
Push, and kick, and flail, and shout
If they can't, they just explode
Bang! Kaboom! Your luck's run out. [includes Soviet animation and baby monkeys] [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on May 26, 2012 - 9 comments

The themes of "The Marvel Super Heroes"

When Captain America throws his mighty shield, all those who chose to oppose his shield must yield. Doc Bruce Banner, pelted by gamma rays, turns into The Hulk; ain't he unglamorous? Tony Stark makes you feel; he's a cool exec with a heart of steel. Cross the Rainbow Bridge of Asgard, where the booming heavens roar, you'll behold in breathless wonder the god of Thunder, mighty Thor. Stronger than a whale, he can swim anywhere; he can breathe underwater and go flying through the air. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on May 17, 2012 - 61 comments

Peasant culture and Russian folklore in Soviet animation.

Peasant culture and Russian folklore in Soviet animation (~400 minutes whereof): Soviet animation abounds in fantasies about the natural, wholesome lives of honorable, strong-willed Russian peasants and folk heroes and their struggles against villainy and adversity. Decorated with splendid folk art motifs that verge on horror vacui, these cel-animated cartoons are excellent aids for learning about (popular conceptions of) Russian folk material culture: decoration, architecture, dress, weaponry, textiles, domestic culture, manners, and so on. [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on May 4, 2012 - 13 comments

“We don’t want everything for free. We just want everything.”

Animator & copyleft activist Nina Paley sat down with a group of teenagers and asked them how they would prefer to support the artists they liked.
posted by overeducated_alligator on Mar 26, 2012 - 67 comments

What's up, Doc?

Chuck Jones draws and discusses Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote and Pepe le Pew and Warner Bros. and the producer Eddie Selzer (MLYT) [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Mar 20, 2012 - 14 comments

Super Best Friends Forever

My Little Pony’s Lauren Faust on how Super Best Friends Forever will make you love Batgirl and Supergirl all over again. The short animations will be part of Cartoon Networks DC Nation block, alongside Beware The Batman, the replacement for the late lamented Batman: The Brave and the Bold.
posted by Artw on Feb 21, 2012 - 28 comments

Christmas? What's that? An Earth holiday?

Because Christmas wasn't painful enough: He-Man and She-Ra: A Christmas Special, in five parts — 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
posted by Nomyte on Dec 22, 2011 - 19 comments

Aaaand.. pause.

What happens when you stop time in a cartoon universe? You get animation smears. (single-serving Tumblr)
posted by theodolite on Nov 28, 2011 - 24 comments

And the florist says, "White lily."

This one time in Edo Japan, Bashō got together with a bunch of his rich friends from Nagoya to make up a set of interlocking poems (renku) — 36 of them, to be exact (a format called kasen). Then, 320 years later, the complete cycle was animated by a diverse international team of artists. [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on Nov 14, 2011 - 26 comments

17 Hours of Russian Animation

MISSING: One elephant. Striped. Big. Polite and good-natured. Loves cod liver oil. [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on Nov 2, 2011 - 30 comments

Orange you glad you got your Nickelodeon?

Two and a half years ago, we explored the early history of Cartoon Network... but it wasn't the only player in the youth television game. As a matter of fact, Fred Seibert -- the man responsible for the most inventive projects discussed in that post -- first stretched his creative legs at the network's truly venerable forerunner: Nickelodeon. Founded as Pinwheel, a six-hour block on Warner Cable's innovative QUBE system, this humble channel struggled for years before Seibert's innovative branding work transformed it into a national icon and capstone of a media empire. Much has changed since then, from the mascots and game shows to the versatile orange "splat." But starting tonight in response to popular demand, the network is looking back with a summer programming block dedicated to the greatest hits of the 1990s, including Hey Arnold!, Rocko's Modern Life, The Adventures of Pete & Pete, The Ren & Stimpy Show, Double Dare, Are You Afraid of the Dark?, Legends of the Hidden Temple, and All That. To celebrate, look inside for the complete story of the early days of the network that incensed the religious right, brought doo-wop to television, and slimed a million fans -- the golden age of Nickelodeon. (warning: monster post inside) [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jul 25, 2011 - 116 comments

Sunday in the Park with Ponies

Apparently there is a Sondheim fan on the My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic staff. The Art of the Dress versus Putting it Together (starts at 4:55) from Sunday in the Park with George (or Barbra Streisand's arrangement). At the Gala versus Ever After from Into the Woods. Ponies previously: 1 2 3
posted by Gordafarin on Jul 15, 2011 - 37 comments

Charley Bowers: the film genius no one's ever heard of

“Highbrow critics talk in ornate polysyllables about the ingenuity and art of the German filmmakers. If they condescended to witness the nonsensical genius of a Charley Bowers comedy they could drool dictionaries.” Educational Pictures Press Book for THERE IT IS, January 23, 1928
Charley Bowers is a genius of silent film and animation that never got the level of attention of his peers Buster Keaton or the Fleischer Brothers. You'll have to search hard to find him in film literature. But watching his work—as a bird lays a Ford Model T or a scruffy ghost tortures a Scotsman and his insect sidekick—you can see the inspiration for the later sight gags of Ernie Kovacs, the visual non sequiturs of Looney Toons, the cut paper trickery of Terry Gilliam and surrealist Andre Breton citing one of Bowers' shorts as the most influential film of 1937. [more inside]
posted by Gucky on Jul 10, 2011 - 18 comments

Snarf! Snarf!

Thundercats Are Go, for a reboot of the 1985 series to begin airing this July.
posted by schmod on May 17, 2011 - 86 comments

I see only the overwhelming indifference of nature.

EXT. STREET -- TWILIGHT. A dreary day in 1971. Wearing a trilby hat and a hideous overcoat, a LONE CROCODILE stands on the rain-slicked sidewalk. Singing in tune with the plangent sounds of the concertina he clutches in his claws, he tells the viewers that today, of all days, is his birthday. This scene presages the appearance of one of the most emblematic characters in Soviet animation. [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on May 7, 2011 - 24 comments

Galerie Ardulik

"The first Gallery dedicated to artists lying behind cinema, comics, video games masterpieces… and who creat [sic], to entertain, the most significant icons of our time." The gallery has previously featured exhibitions from webcomic artist Scott Campbell, H.R. Giger, propaganda-style Futurama posters, Superman penciller Tim Sale, sketches from Star Wars: The Clone Wars, and filmmaker Sylvain Chomet. [more inside]
posted by kagredon on Apr 30, 2011 - 5 comments

Powerhouse

  • It was written by Raymond Scott in 1937, and first heard by the world played by the Raymond Scott Quintette on CBS Radio's Saturday Night Swing Club.
  • It was first recorded in 1937 and released by Master Records. It was later re-released by Brunswick and then Columbia.
  • It contains a middle section that has a greatly different tempo and style from the rest of the song, to the degree that it is sometimes considered to be two different songs.
  • It was a popular tune of its time. Among Raymond Scott's admirers was Carl Stalling, music director for Warner Bros. cartoons. Stalling's appreciation for Scott lead to his music being featured frequently in Warner cartoons. Itself, it has been used in dozens of classic cartoons, especially in places depicting rapid motion or heavy machinery. Despite this, no Warner cartoon contains a complete version of the work.
  • It's now so recognized from its use in cartoons that most people can probably hum portions of its middle potion, and recognize the rest, even if they don't know it's name. It's so connected with cartoons that Cartoon Network used it as a distinctive bumper tune from 1997 to 2003.
  • Regardless of its iconic nature, it's still in copyright and is controlled in the US by Music Sales Corporation, and elsewhere by Warner/Chappell Music.
  • That song is called "Powerhouse."
[more inside]
posted by JHarris on Apr 23, 2011 - 62 comments

Film lovers are sick people.

Film Film Film (1968), an award-winning Soviet animated short (1, 2), depicts the many unalloyed joys of filmmaking, from writer's block to studio censorship, working with children, unforeseen script revisions, delays, running over budget, technical difficulties, and uncertain audience reception. [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on Mar 9, 2011 - 4 comments

A midsummer night's dream on Elm Street.

A hapless painter is endowed with the ability to understand the speech of forest creatures. Little does he know that the evil King Cactus is planning to destroy the forest using his monstrous grinding machine and an army of magically animated polearms, or that he will play an instrumental role in thwarting the scheming xerophyte. Released in 1986, Čudesna šuma ("The Magical Forest") is Yugoslavia's first feature-length animated film. Created in collaboration with a US production company, it's available in English as (hold on to your hats, folks) "The Elm-Chanted Forest." [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on Mar 7, 2011 - 7 comments

Pussy Galore.

In a world much like our own, mouse society is imperiled by a wave of organized cat crime. A top special agent is coaxed out of retirement to transport the blueprints for a top secret weapon that is the last hope of the civilized mouse nations. Macskafogó ("Cat Trap") is a feature-length Hungarian animated film. Released in 1986, it's also available in a dubbed English version titled Cat City. [more inside]
posted by Nomyte on Feb 27, 2011 - 4 comments

Take off your pants and watch cartoons

Your Daily Cartoon [more inside]
posted by jtron on Nov 4, 2010 - 10 comments

Bird Box Studio

Bird Box Studio makes short, simple, wordless, slapstick-heavy, fantastic cartoons. Bird Box UFO. Sketchy Ice Creams. Sketchy Blues. Sketchy Duel. Sketchy Guard. More available on the BBC's "headroom" website. brought to my attention by yoga in this thread
posted by Greg Nog on Oct 29, 2010 - 5 comments

Is it a bird? Is it a plane?

Max Fleischer's Superman (1941-1942) In the early 1940s, Max Fleischer's Superman cartoons gave the Man of Steel an Art Deco flair and plenty of robots to defeat. Here's a brief history and some episodes of the cartoon (Previously)
posted by Artw on Aug 14, 2010 - 40 comments

An animated .gif of Wolverine snacking on a pizza, FOREVER.

Motion comics, why bother?
posted by Artw on Aug 9, 2010 - 47 comments

Portrait of the Animator as a Young Student

A collection of delightful shorts created for each student's final project or thesis. Jonathan Holt's Dog and Butcher (if you don't laugh out loud at 1:01, you must be dead inside). Michael Stevenson's Pigeon Pilfer. Oxygen by Christopher Hendryx. Erica Kobren's Oneironaut. Wayne Lee's Teddy's Gonna Get It. And more.
posted by jeanmari on Jun 8, 2010 - 40 comments

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