Join 3,496 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

6 posts tagged with censorship by Fizz.
Displaying 1 through 6 of 6.

Related tags:
+ (55)
+ (41)
+ (32)
+ (31)
+ (28)
+ (22)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (17)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)


Users that often use this tag:
homunculus (16)
jeffburdges (14)
hoder (9)
owillis (8)
Fizz (6)
filthy light thief (6)
zarq (6)
Artw (6)
adamvasco (5)
Lovecraft In Brooklyn (4)
fearfulsymmetry (4)
mathowie (4)
skallas (4)
Postroad (4)
baylink (3)
ed (3)
dejah420 (3)
matteo (3)
divabat (3)
Blazecock Pileon (3)
reenum (3)
KokuRyu (3)
Abiezer (3)
Poolio (3)
the man of twists ... (3)
asnider (2)
knz (2)
artof.mulata (2)
finite (2)
Pope Guilty (2)
Horace Rumpole (2)
modernnomad (2)
MarshallPoe (2)
unSane (2)
Saucy Intruder (2)
goodnewsfortheinsane (2)
Steve_at_Linnwood (2)
amberglow (2)
rzklkng (2)
chunking express (2)
digaman (2)
troutfishing (2)
Kattullus (2)
insomnia_lj (2)
acrobat (2)
Miyagi (2)
zedzebedia (2)
gluechunk (2)
johnnydark (2)
DragonBoy (2)
john (2)
Steven Den Beste (2)
holgate (2)

"And the world is full of people running about with lit matches."

"Why I'm sending 200 copies of Little Brother to a high-school in Pensacola, FL." [boing boing] "The principal of Booker T Washington High in Pensacola FL cancelled the school's One School/One Book summer reading program rather than letting all the kids go through with the previously approved assignment to read Little Brother, the bestselling young adult novel by Cory Doctorow. With Cory and Tor Books' help, the teachers are fighting back." [VIDEO RESPONSE]
posted by Fizz on Jun 10, 2014 - 61 comments

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.”

The Turn Against Nabokov [newyorker.com]
"The author, whose novels thrum with ironic recurrences, might have been perversely pleased with this: thirty-six years after his death and twenty-two years after the fall of the Soviet Union with all its khudsovets, Vladimir Nabokov is, once again, controversial."

posted by Fizz on Feb 28, 2013 - 44 comments

"There are many rights for which we should fight, but the right to protection from offense is not one of them."

Hari Kunzru: Reading The Satanic Verses in Jaipur: Why the novelist read from Salman Rushdie’s banned book The Satanic Verses to protest against the cancellation of Rushdie’s visit to the Jaipur Literature Festival.
posted by Fizz on Jan 23, 2012 - 8 comments

"But there is sometimes room to use painful language to reclaim our own history."

Heated Debates, Burning Books [Via NewYorker.com] The Canadian writer Lawrence Hill recently received the unsettling news that a Dutch political group would be assembling on Wednesday in Amsterdam to burn copies of his novel, “The Book of Negroes” (published in the Netherlands under the title “Het Negerboek,” and in the U.S. as “Someone Knows My Name”). So what exactly does this historical novel have to do with the Dutch? [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jun 22, 2011 - 46 comments

Joyce’s Ulysses Banned Again

Joyce’s Ulysses Banned Again—by Apple, Not the Government. According to Sarah Weinman at the Daily Finance; she says that a Webcomic adaptation of the book, Rob Berry and Josh Levitas' Ulysses Seen, (previously seen here on Mefi), has been banned from iPads and iPhones because of cartoon nudity. Here is the image that is causing all the controversy. Warning: Contains crudely illustrated male genitalia. via Slate.com. And this isn't the first time. Read about the original censorship and legal battles regarding Joyce's Ulysses..
posted by Fizz on Jun 10, 2010 - 116 comments

You Still Can't Write About Muhammad

Asra Q. Nomani writes in The Wall Street Journal on Sherry Jones's new historical novel, "The Jewel of Medina" about Aisha, the young wife of the prophet Muhammad. Random House has pulled the book for fears of a political and extremist nature. In a statement, Random House said: "We stand firmly by our responsibility to support our authors and the free discussion of ideas, even those that may be construed as offensive by some. However, a publisher must weigh that responsibility against others that it also bears, and in this instance we decided, after much deliberation, to postpone publication for the safety of the author, employees of Random House Inc, booksellers and anyone else who would be involved in distribution and sale of the book." Over at the Guardian, you can read more about the controversy.
posted by Fizz on Aug 12, 2008 - 140 comments

Page: 1