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376 posts tagged with chicago.
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Merry Christmas, Mayor Daley

Last week, the Chicago Reader laid off four of its best journalists: John Conroy (previously), Harold Henderson, Tori Marlan, and Steve Bogira. The cuts almost certainly mark the beginning of the end of the paper's role in Chicago as an investigative force and a corruption watchdog. The New York Times responds with a salute to Conroy and a defense of muckraking's relevance. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Dec 11, 2007 - 25 comments

A history of television hijacking.

During the 70s and 80s a new phenomenon appeared. Television Hijacking. It started in 1977 when a man in England hijacked the sound broadcast of a newscast. In 1986, a hijacker known as Captain Midnight hijacked HBO in response to their scrambling of television signals. The year after (20 years ago as of today), a character disguised as Max Headroom (a television character) infiltrated two Chicago television studios in one night. First the man infiltrated Channel 9 (WGN) for a few seconds with no sound, and then moved on to attack another Chicago station, this time with sound. After the Max Headroom incident, television hacking incidents were rare in the United States except for this one in Wyoming.
posted by ooklala on Nov 22, 2007 - 38 comments

The Chicago Women's Liberation Rock Band

The Chicago Women's Liberation (embedded video) Rock Band [more inside]
posted by sleepy pete on Nov 14, 2007 - 17 comments

Photos of the secret interiors of buildings.

One Wall Away: Hidden Spaces. Jan Theun van Rees photographs secret spaces in Chicago landmarks to allow us to access to what we normally never get to see. My favorites: the old heating ducts for Unity Temple, and inside the Bean. He other series explore Amsterdam's disused theaters, galleries and museums and various personal looks at public spaces.
posted by hydrophonic on Nov 6, 2007 - 7 comments

Bacterial marketing: the other Oskar Schindler

Upon the Nazi invasion of Poland, pediatrician Eugeniusz Łazowski and his friend Stanisław Matulewicz fabricated a fake typhus epidemic to save Polish Jews from the Nazis. Knowing that typhus-infected Jews would be summarily executed, non-Jews were injected with the harmless Proteus OX19, which would generate false positives for typhus. [more inside]
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane on Oct 19, 2007 - 23 comments

Dot's Daily Diary

Dorothy's Daily Diary
1945 and 2007 share the same calendar, so this year Dave is posting a page a day from his mother Dorothy's diary. Sis and Dave chime in with memories, background, and news of the day. Via
posted by carsonb on Oct 18, 2007 - 10 comments

Ghetto Capitalism

Ghetto Capitalists At once an outsider and a welcome participant in the ghetto economy, he found that he was suddenly part of “a vast, often invisible web” of economic exchange. That web supports the residents of Maquis Park and adds a strange sort of order to their existence, tempering chaos and adding predictability to the lives of Chicago’s poor. For the most part, the people he meets seem eager to trade. It’s just that much of what they’re trading isn’t going to meet with the approval of a law-and-order Republican or a bleeding-heart Great Society Democrat.
posted by jason's_planet on Sep 14, 2007 - 29 comments

Every Bitch Must Tip

Welcome to The Wieners Circle, a Chicago hot dog stand where you can stumble in after a night at the bar and trade some colorful banter from the staff (along with your chocolate milkshake). But a local tradition that was "supposed to be fun" often cuts a little too close for the black employees in the predominantly white Lincoln Park establishment. [NSFW]
posted by dhammond on Aug 28, 2007 - 53 comments

Are you gonna eat that pickle? Can I have it?

Picnicmob would like to invite you to a picnic and seat you precisely with those most like you.
posted by sudama on Jul 25, 2007 - 46 comments

Poor kids.

Child Poverty In Chicago -- photographs by Stephen Shames, (c) 1985. Included is Lafeyette (sic) of "There Are No Children Here."
posted by kmennie on Jul 22, 2007 - 6 comments

Video journalism!

Business POV It is a forum for state-of-the-art business journalism using an innovative format: online video. Viewers can watch new, completely original, locally produced video profiles of companies, people and products that fall into our three main interest areas: innovation, entrepreneurship and the creative culture (advertising, graphic design, architecture, the arts). New content is posted Monday-Friday. Check out the archives section (Jason Fried, from 37 Signals is interviewed). Enjoy!
posted by zerobyproxy on May 22, 2007 - 11 comments

Old Lady Leary Left Her Lantern in the Shed

The Chicago Fire and the Web of Memory compiles a fascinating array of primary sources about the 1871 fire that destroyed 4 square miles of the city of Chicago, killing hundreds and leaving nearly one out of five residents homeless. Explore 3D images, music [embedded], children's drawings, and personal recollections. See also a pictorial survey of the damage, including fused marbles and metal hardware, related documents and images at the Library of Congress, and an exoneration of Mrs. O'Leary and her bovine companion, along with a suggestion by John Lienhart that police corruption and class struggle were more to blame than a cow [embedded audio].
posted by Miko on May 16, 2007 - 9 comments

Chi-Tonw. You read that right. Want a tattoo?

Two years ago, a mistake was made: The tattoo read "Chi-Tonw" instead of "Chi-Town." Now, in an act of solidarity, more people are getting tattos spelled Chi-Tonw on purpose. This fellow had it spelled that way on his neck. Chicago Tribune news and blog coverage, and audio on NPR.
posted by Mo Nickels on Apr 11, 2007 - 46 comments

Turn it up!

New voice for the oldest song ever. "The Prayer of an Infertile Woman," (video embedded within article text) is a 3200 year old song that was recently reconstructed and performed by Leiden University Assyriology professor Dr. Theo J. H. Krispijn at the Chicago Oriental Institute.
posted by The Straightener on Apr 4, 2007 - 19 comments

Songs about places

This gem got me thinking: Songs about a place. Some are more evocative of the geography, some of a tangential longing merely rooted in a place and others -- while about a place -- are really rooted more in a time. Some places immortalized in song you want to visit, others you don't , and others don't really exist at all, though we may know somewhere like it. But near or far, border to border, coast-to-coast (from the west side* to the east side and somewhere in the middle as well, there's musical pins all over the map. [links go to videos] *no direct link, second entry
posted by spacely_sprocket on Mar 3, 2007 - 16 comments

United's Flying Object

"I know that what I saw and what a lot of other people saw stood out very clearly, and it definitely was not an [Earth] aircraft." A United Airlines mechanic and other witnesses see a disc-shaped object over Concourse C at O'Hare Airport for nearly 20 minutes in afternoon daylight. At least one purported photo of the object has surfaced. NPR interviews the Chicago Tribune reporter who first wrote about the object. The FAA (which claimed to have no information on the incident before a FOIA request forced them to acknowlege it) theorizes the object was a "weather phenomenon" and is conducting no further investigation.
posted by Hat Maui on Feb 10, 2007 - 67 comments

You down with BYP?

The Black Youth Project, "will examine the attitudes, resources, and culture of African American youth ages 15 to 25, exploring how these factors and others influence their decision-making, norms, and behavior in critical domains such as sex, health, and politics." The project is run by University of Chicago professor Cathy J. Cohen. The sitemap may help you get a handle on what is a tremendous amount of information. Or you could read the press release for a succint summary and links to mentions in the media.
posted by The Straightener on Feb 5, 2007 - 11 comments

T.V. Pirates! Arrrrr!

On November 22nd 1987, sports anchor Dan Roan of Chicago's WGN-TV News Network was narrating the video of the day's football highlights when something highly unusual happened. The pictures on the station monitors in the studio suddenly began to jitter and twitch. And that was just the beginning. Two hour later, it happened a second time (View clip here) [via KUR]
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Jan 24, 2007 - 46 comments

Retail Therapy

Creativity, Inc: Dave Eggers of McSweeney's is a proprietor. A shopkeeper. Perhaps even a franchise magnate! It was his keen perception of unmet needs in niche markets that led to the opening of a growing array of supply houses across the country. Among them: The Pirate Store, for the well-outfitted swashbuckler; The Boring Store, a subtle, unassuming purveyor of goods for secret agents; the Superhero Supply Store, in Brooklyn, carrying all the eyewear and accessories today's world-savers require; and Greenwood Space Travel Supply, where customers are reminded of the space-travel axiom "A lack of preparation is a prescription for mishaps." If these sound like curious business ventures for a celebrated author, there's a reason: the storefronts, though real, are just that - fronts. They're the streetside faces (and fundraising arms) of the nonprofit 826National, a family of learning centers for kids ages 6-18. The 826 'stores' provide free field trips, creatively themed writing workshops, publishing, and one-on-one instruction. Supported by an impressive field of cultural types (including Ira Glass, Sarah Vowell, Sherman Alexie, and others), the program is growing. Coming soon: Michigan 826 will open Monster Union Local 826, and 826LA will open the Echo Park Time Travel Mart.
posted by Miko on Jan 11, 2007 - 51 comments

Milton Friedman dies at 94

Milton Friedman has died. One of the most famous economists to come out of the Chicago school, his 1962 book Capitalism and Freedom was a straightforward challenge to the predominant Keynesian model that government intervention was frequently necessary to prevent market failures, arguing instead that the way to true political freedom was through economic freedom. He was a devout monetarist and although conventional wisdom conflates conservatism with laissez-faire economics, he described his own philosophy as liberal in the Enlightenment sense of the word. His 1980 book Free to Choose, written with his wife Rose in conjunction with the PBS series of the same name, explained in layman's term his philosophy of how a truly free market works for the benefit of society.
posted by Doofus Magoo on Nov 16, 2006 - 123 comments

Who Killed Ryan Harris?

Who Killed Ryan Harris? Eight years ago the body of eleven-year-old Ryan Harris was discovered in a poor neighbourhood on the South Side of Chicago. What followed was a saga involving the youngest children in U.S. history to be charged with murder; the subsequent dropping of the charges after exculpatory evidence surfaced and allegations of coerced confessions; another (adult) suspect allegedly faking a low IQ and entering an Alford plea; lawsuits against the prosecutors on behalf of the boys, later settled out of court; and, earlier this year, one of the boys coming back into the news after being charged in connection with a double shooting, with lawyers insinuating that his earlier ordeal was to blame for his criminal activity. One of the sadder stories I've heard in some time.
posted by Johnny Assay on Oct 31, 2006 - 9 comments

Natty Stoppage or Batty Sabotage?

FBI Agent Chris Saviano Stop raping my wife.
posted by tomierna on Sep 8, 2006 - 59 comments

The Night Chicago Died

An online version of The Chicago Manual of Style is scheduled for release in September 2006. A test drive will be available next month; there's a Quick Tour [PDF] with screenshots and more info.
posted by kirkaracha on Aug 15, 2006 - 51 comments

Flavorpill adds Art & World Events mailing lists...

2 years ago I FPP'd FlavorPill, a company that sends out permission-based emails for books (Boldtype), music (Earplug), and fashion (the JC Report). They've since added ArtKrush (it's art, stupid! - nsfw) and Activate (world events) to their aresenal. In addition to the topic-specific mailing lists, they offer city-specific lists for London, New York, SF, LA, and Chicago. Sample issues are archived on the site.
posted by dobbs on Aug 11, 2006 - 6 comments

Chicago Tribune special report on peak oil

The Chicago Tribune special report on peak oil. Includes a documentary and reporting by Pulitzer-Prize winner Paul Salopek.
posted by stbalbach on Jul 31, 2006 - 78 comments

See you at the rock show!

Tourfilter: Track your favorite bands. See who else is tracking them. Never miss another show! [Boston, Chicago, New York for now - other cities on the way.]
posted by mr.curmudgeon on Jul 5, 2006 - 15 comments

Transparent Street Signs

Cayetano Ferrer is a Chicago based artist whose work involves (among other styles) painting street signs with the images of the items immediately behind them, to give the illusion of transparency (depending on what angle you're viewing from). The latest campaign by Amnesty International seems inspired by his work.
posted by jonson on Jun 8, 2006 - 14 comments

Move over Ferran Adrià?

Chicago: The New Barcelona? When it comes to cuisine, GQ seems to think so.
posted by KevinSkomsvold on May 22, 2006 - 22 comments

Half-mile high buildings...

A growing crop of towers pushing 2,000 feet: though just shy itself, the much-redesigned Freedom Tower is finally under construction for completion in 2011; but there is also the stunning Fordham Spire, approved in Chicago, that will rise to 2,000 feet by 2010. Moscow is planning the tallest tower in Europe, while there are a number of sightseeing and radio towers under construction in Asia. In Dubai, two towers under construction (despite worker protests) are racing to be the world's tallest, both are keeping their final heights secret, but will likely be over half a mile in height -- the Burj Dubai and the Al Burj. As previously discussed, there are great illustrations comparing buildings both built and under construction. Bring on Frank Lloyd Wright's The Illinois!
posted by blahblahblah on May 16, 2006 - 63 comments

Chicago teacher runs his mouth on blog, angers students

A Chicago teacher vents about the situation at his school on his blog and ends up angering the student body, fellow teachers, and parents.
posted by bubblesonx on Apr 23, 2006 - 106 comments

The incredible challenge of recreating reality

Fun with Photoshop and Illustrator Incredibly detailed photo-realistic image of the Chicago Transit Authority's Damen Station [map]. Here's a similar photo. [more inside]
posted by kirkaracha on Apr 10, 2006 - 31 comments

I'm laughing and I'm dancing and it's fun!

Chic-a-go-go is an all-ages dance party that airs weekly on local access in Chicago, hosted by Miss Mia and Ratso, a teenage rat puppet. Costumed hipsters, youngsters and oldsters shake their groove things in a sparsely decorated studio, often while musical guests lip-synch their hits. Ratso gets to interview some real legends too. (Although Lemmy dissed him, and Vanilla Ice was too freaked out.) They've spawned at least one imitator. This Saturday, they'll be taping their tenth anniversary show. (More inside)
posted by hydrophonic on Mar 31, 2006 - 16 comments

Kicking the Pigeon

Kicking the Pigeon: On Sunday, April 13, 2003, at about 5:00 p.m., Diane Bond, a 48 year-old mother of three, stepped out of her eighth floor apartment in 3651 South Federal, the last remaining high-rise at the Stateway Gardens public housing development, and encountered three white men. Although not in uniform, they were immediately recognizable by their postures, body language, and bulletproof vests as police officers. Bond gave me the following account of what happened next.

“Where do you live at?” one of the officers asked. He had a round face and closely cropped hair. Bond later identified him as Christ Savickas.

“Right there,” she pointed to her door.

He put his gun to her right temple and snatched her keys from her hand.
posted by jennyb on Feb 17, 2006 - 48 comments

Book 'em, Google

As a public service, tagged mapping can be used for much more than finding pizza parlors and Craigslist rental entries. Here it gets used to plot criminal activity, like bike thefts and other crimes in West Philadelphia and the larger Philadelphia area, as well as Chicago.
posted by Rothko on Feb 6, 2006 - 11 comments

The Jets. The Sharks. The Gaylords.

The Almighty Gaylords "...To our first time visitors or people with little understanding of street gangs in general, the web site probably appears a little weird or creepy at first glance..." Gang violence - Chicago Gaylord style...
posted by longbaugh on Jan 11, 2006 - 42 comments

Lou Rawls dies at 72

Lou Rawls dies You'll never find... A "velvety baritone" like Lou Rawls, who died Friday of lung cancer at Cedars-Sinai in LA. He moved with his mother from Chicago in the 1950s, was a friend of Sam Cooke, and sang the National Anthem at Game 2 of the 2005 World Series in Chicago. Rawls sang with Sam Cooke, was awarded three Grammys, sold one platinum and five gold albums. He said: There are no limits to music, so why should I limit myself?"
posted by SeeAych4 on Jan 6, 2006 - 31 comments

Go Sox Go!

88 years in the making. The Chicago White Sox have swept the series.
posted by wfrgms on Oct 26, 2005 - 74 comments

Chicago Heat Wave 1995

In the summer of 1995 there was a week-long heat wave in Chicago. Over 700 people died. Most of them were the elderly, poor, and African-Americans. Link above is a Slate article by Eric Klinberg who wrote the definitive Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago (2003) in which he concludes that "a city, in its decision to operate like a corporation, experienced the breakdown of massive social services" and the resulting "widening cracks in the social foundations of America's cities".
posted by stbalbach on Sep 9, 2005 - 20 comments

Fired for words

Gary Skoien terminated for putting a bounty on Da Mayor's head Skoien was fired from his high powered day job at Prime Group by his boss - a Daley democrat apparently - for putting a $10K bounty on Mayor Daley for information leading to his arrest. Doug Ibendahl, founder and coordinator of the Republican Young Professionals, said the bounty is unprofessional and Skoien should be removed as heaqd of the GOP in Cook County. Yeah, but fired? Prime Group CEO Michael Reschke said Friday that Skoien fatally blunted his effectiveness in the company and that the Daley administration did not influence his firing. "Gary positioned himself where he can no longer be an effective executive officer of our company," said Reschke, who has made political contributions mostly to Democrats, including at least $2,000 to Daley, but also to a few Republicans, including at least $250 to Skoien. Truly, Chicago is not the most corrupt American city. It's the most theatrically corrupt.
posted by Smedleyman on Aug 1, 2005 - 38 comments

bounty

A $10,000 bounty & appalling arrogance. Gary Skoien, Cook County GOP chairman, placed a $10,000 bounty on Da mare's head over by dere. Gary Skoien: "I am personally placing a ten thousand dollar bounty on the head of Richard Daley. He's the head Democrat and chief punk on that Chicago team." Jacqueline Heard: "A bounty?" Gary Skoien: "Yeah, ten thousand bucks of my own money for the first of my men who really creams that guy."
posted by Smedleyman on Jul 27, 2005 - 53 comments

Chicago: Bang! Bang!

Chicagocrime.org takes the Chicago Police Department's Citizen ICAM and puts it into an easily searchable -- by crime type, street, date, district or location type -- format, along with a Google Map. Who knew police station parking lots were so dangerous?
posted by me3dia on May 19, 2005 - 10 comments

Two tons of fun!

Dick "Two Ton" Baker is a Chicago legend who had a long career in radio, records, and children's television. He was a child prodigy, a beloved radio host, and looked upon with favor by none other than Duke Ellington. He also made some really terrifically funny music. Check out mp3 versions of "I Like Stinky Cheese," "Civilization" (a hit for Danny Kaye), the classic "I'm a Little Weenie," and many others, all sung in Two Ton's terrifically expressive baritone. Go easy on this site's bandwidth, though. Check out also the collection of press clippings and articles about Two Ton, a lovingly compiled discography (.PDF), and then, because you know you want 'em, buy some CDs of the great man's music. Oh, and did I mention that it's Two Ton's voice you hear on the classic piece of Cold War "let's make nuclear annihilation palatable to the kiddies!" Americana "Duck and Cover"? Well, it is!
posted by Dr. Wu on May 17, 2005 - 7 comments

Encyclopedia of Chicago

The Encyclopedia of Chicago is now online and free, less than a year after being released in book form.
posted by me3dia on May 12, 2005 - 19 comments

Leap of Faith

"And the University of Chicago cried unto the Lord, saying, Heal her now, O God, I beseech thee." The Templeton Foundation recently gave U of C researchers a $1.8 million grant to study connections between religious beliefs and health. Those researchers have already done studies that suggest that religious faith helps reduce depression. It's not exactly faith healing, but some people aren't quite ready to shout "Amen!".
posted by goatdog on Apr 27, 2005 - 21 comments

Fred Anderson's Velvet Lounge

The Velvet is moving! Fred Anderson's Velvet Lounge, one of the best places in Chicago to see avant garde jazz, has to move. To help fund the construction of a new club, they're having a couple of fundraisers (pdf) at the Hot House and at the Velvet in late May. If you don't know Fred, you should get to know him. If you find yourself in Chicago in May, check him out at the 40th anniversary of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, which he helped found. If you find yourself far from Chicago, a lot of his music is available on CD, including my favorite, the 2003 disc Back at the Velvet Lounge.
posted by goatdog on Apr 25, 2005 - 11 comments

Return of Lollapalooza

Lollapalooza returns to Chicago this summer with a line up that I'm actually a little excited about. Presented by Parkways Foundation it looks like the damage that might be done to Grant Park by the two day festival might just be covered by the proceeds.
posted by FlamingBore on Apr 22, 2005 - 87 comments

The Legend of Dixie Square Mall

Dixie Square Mall, in the mostly-blighted "inner ring" Chicago suburb of Harvey, Illinois, opened in 1966. It suffered gradual decline, until it closed in 1978. A year later, film crews gave the mall a brief makeover and Jake and Elwood Blues drove through the place. Then, nothing. For 20-plus years, the mall sat and decayed. Renovation plans (even a planned baseball stadium for the White Sox) were popular over the years, but never panned out. In 1993, a rape and murder took place in the JC Penney's space. From space, the mall looks beat up. From the ground, it looks even worse. Human fascination with deserted space has borne a number of websites and spelunking trips (along with some excellent then-and-now comparisons), and a documentary is apparently in the works. Finally, at long last, there's renewed hope for the site. Previously seen here and here.
posted by AgentRocket on Apr 18, 2005 - 21 comments

Thief Pumps $900 Worth Of Stolen Gasoline

Gas Pump Hacker. "CHICAGO -- In a bold and outrageous theft staged in broad daylight, a driver pumped about $900 worth of gasoline at a suburban gas station. The man removed the panel of a pump in Country Club Hills and manipulated the mechanics of the pump so that it would continue to pump gas without registering inside the station... Other cars then pulled up to the pump and, apparently, cut deals with the thief, who then filled up their tanks and took off..."
posted by azul on Apr 16, 2005 - 31 comments

What Would You Do?

Chicago Poet = Massachusetts Killer. J.J. Jameson lived as a Chicago Type for two decades. We knew him as an old-time activist. An eccentric, somewhat disheveled open-mic reader. An author (scroll down or search page for “cauliflower”). A heavy drinker who tried recovery at least once. A quick-wit rabble-rouser. In short, a Chicago guy, despite the New England accent. He was also the #1 Most Wanted Killer back east. My only question is: if you had killed two people, escaped from prison, turned around an saw no one chasing you, and could end up anywhere you wanted, would you choose to build a life in the influential if somewhat goofball and seasonally cold Chicago Poetry Scene? Or would you go the Caribbean route?
posted by juggernautco on Mar 23, 2005 - 128 comments

OMG I heard Jeremy Jordan Loves DEMON DOGS

When Search Terms Attack. In another delightful display of mistaken web identity, fans of Jeremy Jordan, who was apparently discovered by former 'Chicago' manager Peter Schivarelli at his Downtown Chicago Hot Dog Stand, commandeer the stand's reviews page.
posted by ulotrichous on Mar 5, 2005 - 7 comments

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