1152 posts tagged with china.
Displaying 51 through 100 of 1152. Subscribe:

It's like Uber for Willy Wonka boat rides.

WikiTravel calls The Shanghai Sightseeing Tunnel "A slow-moving tram, through a comically low-tech tunnel of antiquated 80's era rope lights, lasers and car dealership ilk inflatables." YMMV. [SLYT, lots of blinking lights]
posted by Room 641-A on Nov 29, 2015 - 30 comments

Triumph of the Will

From National Geographic YouTube channel: The Shaolin (Wushu) Temple Kung Fu Academy is the largest school of its kind in China. Footage was adapted from filmmaker Inigo Westmeier's 2012 documentary 'Dragon Girls' with music from Gener8tio featuring M.I.A. The Academy has a website.
posted by growabrain on Nov 18, 2015 - 10 comments

If you were with me you'd suffer.

Why Australia has fallen bizarrely in love with a Chinese dating show
posted by bswinburn on Nov 14, 2015 - 28 comments

Taiwan-China leaders to meet for first time since 1949

Taiwan's president Ma Ying-jeou and China's president Xi Jinping will meet in Singapore on Saturday---the first meeting between leaders on both sides of the Taiwan Strait since 1949, when Mao forced the Nationalist regime off mainland China and into retreat into Taiwan. The Singapore meeting set for Saturday has been planned behind the scene for a year. Already, opposition parties in Taiwan are crying foul, calling for the impeachment of Ma and accusing him of going against mainstream public opinion to meet with Xi.
posted by wallawallasweet on Nov 3, 2015 - 15 comments

This is Like a Pearl in My Hand – a collection of portraits

Invisible touch: the artist using magic ink to help China's blind children On a cold day, only the part of the image that has physical contact will be clear. But the sensitivity of the ink means the book looks different depending on the weather: on hot days, all the photographs will be visible at once and with no contact.
posted by Michele in California on Nov 1, 2015 - 1 comment

Myanmar's "Big State Secret"

Global Witness has published a report on the jade industry in Myanmar, a trade "worth far more than previously thought - up to US$31 billion in 2014 alone. That is equivalent to nearly half the GDP of the whole country, which badly needs it. But hardly any of the money is reaching ordinary people or state coffers." [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Nov 1, 2015 - 4 comments

China ends one-child policy

China will allow all couples to have two children, a Communist Party leadership meeting decided on Thursday, bringing an end to decades of restrictive policies that limited most urban families to one child. It is estimated that the one-child policy prevented the births of 400 million children since its adoption.
posted by Sir Rinse on Oct 29, 2015 - 129 comments

Meet The Uyghurs

Kevin Kelly spent two weeks in Xinjiang (East Turkestan) in far west China. “This area has more in common with the culture of Turkey than with Beijing. It's kebab with chopsticks. But this is really China. In fact it is the largest province of China.“ Here are 120 photos of the "Silk Road".
Kevin Kelly loves to travel: Read the “Previous Lives“ part on his bio. 
KK's Asia travels on Metafilter before, here and here. [more inside]
posted by growabrain on Oct 28, 2015 - 36 comments

Everyone sing along now. EVERYONE.

What's the 13.5? Why, it's 十三五 - China's 13th Five Year Plan. And here's a happy, chirpy pop song and video to explain it all. (slyt)
posted by Devonian on Oct 27, 2015 - 50 comments

Viaducts and bridges, as made in China

The SLJ900/32 Segmental Bridge Launching Machine. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 26, 2015 - 12 comments

Where Daughters Are Preferred

Mosuo, Kingdom of Daughters Not All Chinese Want Sons
posted by Yellow on Oct 26, 2015 - 3 comments

Time and Tide

Life behind the Three Gorges Dam
The major themes of the China story - unprecedented socioeconomic change, environmental crises, the thirst for energy, the destruction of historical and cultural heritage - are all here, framed against the backdrop of millions of ordinary Chinese struggling to cope with the powerful man-made and natural forces beyond their control. Would the huge sacrifices be worth it in the end...
Photo-Essay, over time, by Singaporean photo-journalist Chua Chin Hon
posted by infini on Oct 18, 2015 - 5 comments

Out of the Cultural Revolution, a Nobel Prize and a cure for malaria

Earlier this month, Youyou Tu was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for her discovery of artemisinin, also known as qinghaosu. She is the first Chinese Nobel recipient for work that was done in mainland China. Dr. Tu's studies were done in the midst of the Cultural Revolution, a politically precarious time for Chinese academics, which adds a layer of historical complexity to her work. It is difficult to overstate the importance of artemisinin to anti-malarial efforts. Unfortunately, artemisinin-resistant strains of malaria are already beginning to appear only thirty years after the drug was introduced.
posted by sciatrix on Oct 14, 2015 - 12 comments

The tragic tale of Mt Everest’s most famous dead body

The tragic tale of Mt Everest’s most famous dead body is part one of a two part BBC article centered around the story of Tsewang Paljor, known as "Green Boots", whose body has remained for 20 years near the summit where he died. Part two is Death in the clouds: The problem with Everest’s 200+ bodies [more inside]
posted by danny the boy on Oct 9, 2015 - 77 comments

“This is for the kids,” he said, “I’m too old.”

A new trend in headwear is taking China by storm. The New York Times is on the case. [more inside]
posted by theodolite on Oct 7, 2015 - 64 comments

"The Chairman of Everything"

Born Red is a long profile of Xi Jinping, President of China, by Evan Osnos of The New Yorker. Osnos explains the character and policies of China's current leader through his biography. He was privileged son of a revolutionary leader. After the father fell from grace, the son endured a troubled decade. His father was invited back into the fold, and Xi rose through the ranks all the way to the top. Xi is considered the leader of the informal princeling faction of the Chinese Communist Party. He has put a focus on combating corruption, which had gone out of control in the last couple of decades, and stifling dissent. Recent months have seen tumultuous stock markets and a large army parade. Since coming to power, a personality cult has been promoted by the state. Jeffrey Wasserstrom makes a comparison between the Chinese President and the Pope.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 19, 2015 - 10 comments

Chinese calligraphy and painting manual from 1633 now online, in full

Since 1933, the Cambridge University Library has had a pristine copy of Shi zhu zhai shu hua pu, the Ten Bamboo Studio collection of calligraphy and painting from 1633. Because the book was so fragile, the butterfly bound (Google books preview) manual for teachers of art and writing was not opened until it could be properly digitized. That day has come, and the entire book is online, giving the world a view of “the earliest and the most beautiful example of multicolor printing anywhere in the world,” according to Charles Aylmer, head of the Chinese department at Cambridge University Library. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 11, 2015 - 13 comments

Why drivers in China intentionally kill the pedestrians they hit.

Driven to Kill. The "hit-to-kill" phenomenon in China where a driver who has accidentally struck a pedestrian will stop to run over them again, or multiple times, to ensure they are dead. Trigger warning for text descriptions of gruesome vehicular murder. Lots of links to photos and videos in the article that you should click at your own discretion.
posted by allkindsoftime on Sep 9, 2015 - 83 comments

Basic Income: How to Fix a Broken Monetary Transmission Mechanism

FINLAND: New Government Commits to a Basic Income Experiment - "The Finnish government of Juha Sipilä is considering a pilot project that would give everyone of working age a basic income."[1,2,3] (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Sep 4, 2015 - 24 comments

De Profundis Clamavi, o mandarin

In a week when China's troubled economy and plunging stock market have made headlines worldwide, the Globe and Mail probes one of hidden causes of the difficulty the country faces in transitioning to a modern consumer economy: The Ant Tribe, the middle class Chinese who are literally being driven underground. [more inside]
posted by Diablevert on Aug 25, 2015 - 20 comments

Three Stars Mound

In 1986, workers in Sichuan province in China were digging for clay for bricks when they stumbled onto an archaeological treasure: a major site for a Bronze Age civilization previously only guessed at. The civilization, called Sanxingdui (wikipedia), had an art style unlike any other Chinese civilization previously encountered. Archaeologists had suspected there was a major city in the area since an early jade find in 1929 and a team went to work immediately, unearthing burial pits and gorgeous artifacts. (More history of the site.) An exhibit of treasures from Sanxingdui is on display in Houston until September; a permanent display can be found at a museum dedicated to the culture in Chengdu. Meanwhile, archaeologists continue to discover more of the city (warning: autoplay video) and even the remains of some of the inhabitants.
posted by immlass on Aug 18, 2015 - 6 comments

♫ Corn Wars/if they should scorn wars/please let these Corn Wars stay ♫

Corn Wars: The farm-by-farm fight between China and the United States to dominate the global food supply. The U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI now contend, in effect, that the theft of genetically modified corn technology is as credible a threat to national security as the spread to nation-states of the technology necessary to deliver and detonate nuclear warheads. Disturbingly, they may be right. As the global population continues to climb and climate change makes arable soil and water for irrigation ever more scarce, the world’s next superpower will be determined not just by which country has the most military might but also, and more importantly, by its mastery of the technology required to produce large quantities of food.
posted by Cash4Lead on Aug 18, 2015 - 26 comments

Social Perfectionism And Why Suicide Unfairly Impacts Men

In 2013, if you were a man between the ages of 20 and 49 who’d died, the most likely cause was not assault nor car crash nor drug abuse nor heart attack, but a decision that you didn’t wish to live any more. [more inside]
posted by bswinburn on Aug 15, 2015 - 168 comments

Massive explosion in Tianjin

Multiple explosions have hit Tianjin's port area. Tianjin is the 4th-largest city in China, sitting squarely next to Beijing in the Bohai Economic Rim, which includes the Hebei area, and slated to be one of the areas of focus and development by the central government. The explosions (recorded footage) have taken place in the Binhai region, by the coast. Details are still incoming, but early indications suggest an industrial accident with 300 casualties.
posted by qcubed on Aug 12, 2015 - 191 comments

China’s most controversial,most honored, most censored author

China’s Most Censored Author Published His Riskiest Book Yet [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 8, 2015 - 4 comments

Utah, get me two!

With designs inspired by Peking opera the facekini protects its wearer from jellyfish stings and sunburns.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jul 16, 2015 - 38 comments


With Vancouver's average detached home price rising 28% to $1.12M (CAD), what the heck is going on? Canadaland's Jesse Brown interviews South China Morning Post columnist Ian Young, author of Hongcouver about wealth migration, racism, and immigration schemes. [more inside]
posted by GuyZero on Jul 7, 2015 - 79 comments

China’s annual human rights report on the US

Full text: The Human Rights Record of the United States in 2014. via
posted by infini on Jun 30, 2015 - 27 comments

Beijing is Sinking

This weekend, the seminal Beijing band Chui Wan will launch their (self-titled) second album after an extensive U.S tour. Their new single, The Sound of Wilderness, debuted on NPR last week - quite possibly a milestone for the Chinese indie scene. The album's highlights include the seven-minute closer "Beijing is Sinking", a swirling, chaotic song about staying afloat in a torrent of change. An apt metaphor, perhaps, for all the musicians in Beijing's fiercely iconoclastic indie underground. Initial reviews for the album are buoyant. It's seen as a coming-of-age moment for the band, for its influential record label Maybe Mars, and perhaps even for the small, vibrant Beijing indie community. So let's turn back the clock to the early 2000s, to post-SARS Beijing, and see how we got here. [more inside]
posted by beijingbrown on Jun 3, 2015 - 17 comments

Nearly 700 in South Korea quarantined for MERS

In South Korea, 2 people have died of MERS, with 18 people becoming infected over the past 10 days, resulting in nearly 700 people being placed in quarantine. A man broke quarantine and traveled to China, subsequently testing positive for China's first confirmed case of MERS. Untill recently, all cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) had been linked to countries in and near the Arabian Peninsula. Right now, there is no vaccine for MERS and no treatment.
posted by needled on Jun 2, 2015 - 21 comments

The Chinese Juggernaut Isn't

For American pundits, China isn’t a country. It’s a fantasyland.

Whenever I want to be cheered up about the future of my adopted country, I turn to American pundits. The air here might be deadly, the water undrinkable, the Internet patchy and the culture strangled, but I can always be reassured that China is beating America at something, whether it’s clean energy, high-speed rail, education or even the military.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on May 31, 2015 - 18 comments

Oasis lost.

The lost city of Ordos The Kangbashi district, planned to accommodate a population in excess of one million, is home to a lonely 20,000 people – leaving 98% of this 355-square kilometre site either under construction or abandoned altogether.
posted by bitmage on May 24, 2015 - 38 comments

What would comedy be without the potential for ... humiliating defeat?

Can China take a joke? The NYT Magazine examines the growing standup comedy scene in China, and its complicated relationship with traditional Chinese "cross-talk" performances, and modern Chinese society. [previously on metafilter]
posted by firechicago on May 24, 2015 - 2 comments

Funeral stripping in China, Taiwan: rural tradition vs urban modernity

[Note: *starred* links contain images of scantily clad women, making them possibly NSFW] If you've caught some of the *shorter "Crazy China" articles* circulating around recently, you've heard that the Chinese government is trying to crack down on stripping at funerals in rural communities. While you generally won't find stripping mentioned in descriptions of Chinese funeral traditions, other sources like *CNN* and *NPR* try to add context to this news. NPR notes that this **also occurs in Taiwan (Nat. Geo. video)**, but the article doesn't delve further. Luckily, we have the *research from University of South Carolina anthropologist Marc L. Moskowitz* to elaborate, capturing the more varied and complex reality of Taiwanese Electric Flower Cars and *the culture of dancing for the dead.* There's also a great Q&A recorded at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), which addresses questions of class division, safety of the women, gender equality, and other related topics. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 14, 2015 - 18 comments

photos: The Chinese Art of the Crowd

"After viewing news photographs from China for years, one of my favorite visual themes is large crowd formations. Whether the subject is military parades or world-record attempts, mass exercises or enormous performances, the images are frequently remarkable. The masses of people can look beautiful or intimidating, projecting a sense of strength and abundance. Individuals can become pixels in a huge painting, or points on a grid, or echoes of each other in identical uniforms or costumes."
posted by paleyellowwithorange on May 8, 2015 - 38 comments

Lards of the Flies

In China, Pigs Are Flying. Almost. [New York Times]
"With summer almost here, swine across China are jumping or being shoved off platforms and splashing into pools and ponds, where they bob around before paddling to shore."
posted by Fizz on May 8, 2015 - 8 comments

China announces it is scoring its citizens using big data

China rates its own citizens - including online behaviour: "The Chinese government is currently implementing a nationwide electronic system, called the Social Credit System, attributing to each of its 1,3 billion citizens a score for his or her behavior. The system will be based on various criteria, ranging from financial credibility and criminal record to social media behavior. From 2020 onwards each adult citizen should, besides his identity card, have such a credit code." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on May 5, 2015 - 77 comments

The Met's China Exhibit: Cultural Celebration or Appropriation?

The Met's soon-to-open exhibit, titled "China: Through the Looking Glass," tackles the impact of Chinese aesthetics on Western fashion, and how Chinese culture has inspired fashionable imagination for hundreds of years. Juxtaposing high fashion with Chinese art, film, clothing, and artifacts, the exhibit looks to explore why Western culture is as enraptured with the East as it is. [more inside]
posted by ourt on May 4, 2015 - 42 comments

What do people in China buy online?

BBC: "Huang's new project is based on a similar idea - this time, he asked people to display everything they've ever bought online. The results are a testament to the overwhelming popularity of online shopping, particularly China's most popular internet shopping platform, Taobao." [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Apr 29, 2015 - 8 comments

John Denver, America's unofficial musical diplomat

As John Denver's US prominence waned into the 1980s, opposite the rise of new wave and harder rock, he kept touring internationally for some notable firsts. In 1979, Denver was one of the performers to welcome Chinese Vice-Premier Deng Xiaoping to the US, and six years later, Denver was the first western artist to tour in the USSR, where he performed alongside Kermit the Frog. In 1992, he had another first for a western peformer, when Denver toured mainland China, to find that many of his audiences already knew his songs. Two years later, he was the first US act in Vietnam since the Vietnam War. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 18, 2015 - 44 comments

Anthropology, already read

Déjà Lu republishes locally-selected scholarly articles from journals connected to regional anthropological associations around the world. The result is a PDF-heavy but fascinating collection of long reads on obscure topics. Via. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on Apr 18, 2015 - 4 comments

“But Tibetan mastiffs are so 2013.”

Once-Prized Tibetan Mastiffs Are Discarded as Fad Ends in China [New York Times]
“Then there is the Tibetan mastiff, a lumbering shepherding dog native to the Himalayan highlands that was once the must-have accouterment for status-conscious Chinese. Four years ago, a reddish-brown purebred named Big Splash sold for $1.6 million, according to news reports, though cynics said the price was probably exaggerated for marketing purposes. No reasonable buyer, self-anointed experts said at the time, would pay more than $250,000 for a premium specimen.”
posted by Fizz on Apr 17, 2015 - 34 comments

Geopolitics of Finance

Tired of waiting for IMF and World Bank recognition of its financial muscle, China stepped aside to lead the creation of an Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) inviting the rest of BRIC to join as cofounders. Unexpectedly, there's been a bit of a global stampede to get in an application as founding member. Here's a helpful infographic. And here are some widely divergent points of view pontificating on the geopolitics of finance.
posted by infini on Apr 4, 2015 - 18 comments

China vs GitHub

China's network infrastructure has been attacking open source hosting site GitHub for three days and counting. A primary source of the DDoS traffic was discovered by Insight Labs; Javascript injected into pages at Baidu. Baidu, one of the largest Chinese web properties, denies being involved. Chinese government officials have recently expressed a desire for new ways to censor the Internet. Experts speculate that the Javascript was injected by the Chinese network infrastructure, perhaps in retaliation for GitHub hosting the firewall circumvention projects GreatFire and cn-nytimes. GitHub has said little about the nature of the attack; its status pages document the ongoing, largely successful efforts to defend their business.
posted by Nelson on Mar 29, 2015 - 52 comments

Connecting the Dots

With all the upheaval in the skies and on the ground, here is one person's opinion on why the U.S. is fighting beside Iran in Iraq and against it in Yemen. Putin tells Iran that an immediate ceasefire is needed in Yemen. All the while...negotiators from six world powers (the P5+1) are attempting to strike a deal with Iran to restrict its nuclear programme in exchange for sanctions relief. As Iran nuclear talks 'enter endgame' in Switzerland...China and Russia say they will show up tomorrow. Keeping things cloaked in intrigue: the US accuses Israel of spying on nuclear talks with Iran and Putin says Western spies plot against Russia before polls, blurs the picture further.
posted by Emor on Mar 28, 2015 - 58 comments

Meeting Bro Orange.

How Matt Stopera became a minor Chinese celebrity. A romance for the spring festival. Single link buzzfeed, but worth it.
posted by idiopath on Mar 19, 2015 - 19 comments

Life as a ghost

The Ghost Children of China Forty-five years ago, China inaugurated an era of population control, amid fears that too many people would bring catastrophe. In 1980, it officially announced a national one-child policy, forcibly limiting the size of families. But there have been, inevitably, second (and, rarely, third and fourth) children: children who go unrecognized by the government, have no official identity – who are left to live outside the institutions of regulated society. Little Jie is one of them. [more inside]
posted by modernnomad on Mar 16, 2015 - 12 comments

Saving species is essentially a forever-type problem.

If other horses are the equivalent of feral dogs, then the Przewalski’s horse is a wolf. In its native Mongolia, where it goes by the name takhi, it is known as the father of horses. Mongolians regard the takhi as spiritual, holy animals, and for millennia they largely left them alone... The trouble all began in the late 19th century, when the Western world finally took note of the takhi. Nikolai Przewalski, a Polish-born explorer serving as a colonel in the Russian army, “discovered” the horses during an 1878 expedition to the Mongolian-Chinese frontier. Naturally, Przewalski named the horse after himself, and when he returned to the West, word quickly spread among zoos, adventurers, and curio collectors about the mysterious wild horses.
posted by ChuraChura on Mar 13, 2015 - 5 comments

Come again?

“I don’t think the Dalai Lama would mind if you saw this through the prism of Monty Python,” said Robert Barnett, director of the modern Tibetan studies program at Columbia University. Zhu Weiqun, a Communist Party official who has long dealt with Tibetan issues, told reporters in Beijing on Wednesday that the Dalai Lama had, essentially, no say over whether he was reincarnated. That was ultimately for the Chinese government to decide, he said, according to a transcript (in Chinese) of his comments on the website of People’s Daily, the party’s main newspaper.
posted by jasper411 on Mar 11, 2015 - 20 comments

American academics read too much Hegel

I Have No Idea What’s Going to Happen in China and Neither Do You
posted by Nevin on Mar 10, 2015 - 42 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 24