526 posts tagged with cinema and film.
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Lesbian movies that don't suck

Top Ten Best Lesbian Movies: 10 Queer Movies That Don’t Suck. | Top Ten Queer Girl Movies That Don’t Suck: Best Lesbian Movies Part #2 (Autostraddle). Previously: "I bind you, Hollywood, from doing harm", Maybe not the warmest color.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 21, 2015 - 40 comments

How about four seasons and EIGHT movies?

Hollywood's reboot-a-palooza continues with the recent release of "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.", based on the classic 1960's television series starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum. However, this is far from the first time the property has been in theaters. [more inside]
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Aug 20, 2015 - 32 comments

"Got room for one more?"

After some recent intriguing revelations concerning Quentin Tarantino's "Hateful Eight" (such as it's wide 70mm release this Christmas and that it will feature the first Ennio Morricone Western score in over four decades), the full trailer has finally arrived.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Aug 12, 2015 - 62 comments

White God

How did they get those dogs to do that? "Hundreds of dogs rise up against their oppressors in this visually stunning, one-metaphor-fits-all Hungarian drama... a film featuring 274 dogs, no CGI, and a pair of canine protagonists who consistently out-emote their human co-stars."
posted by kliuless on Aug 9, 2015 - 32 comments

"One dog goes one way and the other dog goes the other way."

It starts with one of cinema's most famous paintings (you may have seen it before), but it doesn't end there. Guardian contributor Alex Godfrey does a little investigating into a famous movie prop and discovers the life of its subject, John Weaving.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Aug 5, 2015 - 10 comments

The plot thickens

What was once a series content to celebrate simple boy-racer pleasures, the seventh Fast & Furious fell prey to a recent tentpole-film affliction: ridiculously over-complicated plotting. Iron Man 3 and Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation writer Drew Pearce draws an analogy for this blockbuster bloat, responsible for routinely pushing run times over the two-hour mark: “Much as I love a prog-rock album, if it’s a pop song I like it to be short and sweet, and I think it has more impact that way. And summer blockbusters are very proggy right now.” Mission impenetrable: are Hollywood blockbusters losing the plot?
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 4, 2015 - 58 comments

"You've never seen any of them. At least, let's hope you haven't."

The recent reboot "Vacation" is packed with call backs to the original 1983 film, but one thing that is conspicuously missing is the name "National Lampoon" preceding the title. Vulture recently published a short history of the National Lampoon and how it has gone from it's peak in the 70's and 80's way down to the unfortunate straight-to-DVD output of the last fifteen years. Bonus: The trailer for the upcoming documentary: "Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of National Lampoon".
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Aug 4, 2015 - 28 comments

Tarkovsky on Tarkovsky

Shot between 1962 and 1986, Tarkovsky’s seven feature films often grapple with metaphysical and spiritual themes, using a distinctive cinematic style. Long takes, slow pacing and metaphorical imagery – they all figure into the archetypical Tarkovsky film (Note: free versions of these films have been here before, links have sadly died in the old posts). [more inside]
posted by infinite intimation on Aug 1, 2015 - 18 comments

You... you imbecile. You bloated idiot. You stupid fat-head you.

Adam Frost and Melanie Patrick of the British Film Institute take a look at film noir and what makes a film noir-ish.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 1, 2015 - 12 comments

Freddy Krueger vs. Spiderman? I'd buy that for a dollar.

An Illustrated Guide to Iconic Fictional Weapons.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jul 28, 2015 - 39 comments

British Movietone Archive and Associated Press Archive

The British Movietone archive of nearly fifty thousand newsreel films is now on YouTube. Movietone started making newsreels in 1929 and stopped fifty years later. You can find clips about nearly any subject, women's rights, space exploration, and sports. The archive has a number of playlists, including one where archivist Jenny Hammerton presents clips she finds interesting. But, I hear you say, do they have cute cat videos? Yes. Also, a parachuting dog and jokes about Hitler. Also now availabe, the Associated Press Archive of more than 170 thousand video clips. The Guardian has a list of interesting clips from both archives.
posted by Kattullus on Jul 22, 2015 - 5 comments

"The Fate of the World in the Hands of a Dame!"

Comic book artist Joe Phillips recently presented "Silver Screen Heroes", which places stars from the golden age of Hollywood into modern superhero roles.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jul 21, 2015 - 36 comments

"I made my bones when you were going out with cheerleaders!"

Prolific actor Alex Rocco, perhaps best known for his performance as Moe Greene in "The Godfather", has passed away at the age of 79.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jul 19, 2015 - 32 comments

Another Bughunt

Galaxy of Terror, Mutant (NSFW), Contamination and the joy of cheap alien knockoffs. Prefer the sequel? Here's Aliens remade under the name "Terminator 2". Sadly one take on the franchise that will not be seeing the light of day is Alien Identity, a fan film recently shut down by a cease and desist from Fox. Meanwhile the Neil Blomkamp Alien film continues to incubate.
posted by Artw on Jul 18, 2015 - 50 comments

Six Years of "Scenic Routes"

If you're like me, you're still kinda recovering from the abrupt dissolution of The Dissolve earlier this week. This morning over at the AV Club, they posted a new entry in their series "Scenic Routes", which may be the best Movie-centric feature AV Club runs. And at this moment of recovery for dedicated movie geeks, it's a great opportunity to review some of their more memorable entries over the years. [more inside]
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jul 10, 2015 - 8 comments

In the Shadow of Sigourney

On the heels of their recent discussion of "Aliens" in their Movie of the Week series, the folks at the Dissolve have put together an impressive list inspired by the last survivor of the Nostromo: "The 50 Most Daring Film Roles For Women Since Ripley"
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jun 28, 2015 - 55 comments

And the 2015 award for "Bad Timing in Cinema" goes to...

United Passions started out as a FIFA vanity project telling the story of the men who helped found the organization. Then one month before the film's release in theaters, Fourteen FIFA officials were arrested on corruption charges (previously) and president Sepp Blatter announced he would step down from his post. Now, in the wake of incredibly dismal box office and rock bottom ratings on both Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic, Both director Frederic Auburtin and star Tim Roth (who portrays Blatter in the film) have publicly come out against the film and apologized for their involvement.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jun 19, 2015 - 50 comments

Giant Lumbering Beasts

Since April three of the biggest movies in history have opened: Furious 7 (with a worldwide gross of 1.5 billion dollars), Age of Ultron (with a worldwide gross of 1.3 billion dollars) and Jurassic World (with a worldwide gross of half a billion after just one weekend, and heading towards a likely record). With Star Wars down the pike in December, we're looking at a record setting year for the box office, largely on the backs of franchise action/adventure films. Mark Harris writes about the new franchise film economy in Park Effects, and relatedly, Alex Pappademas considers the efforts to create a farm league of indie directors for these new billion dollar movies in Mr. DNA.
posted by codacorolla on Jun 18, 2015 - 63 comments

Niki de Saint Phalle

‘I shot against Daddy, all men, small men, tall men, big men, fat men, men, my brother, society, the church, the convent, school, my family, my mother, all men, daddy, myself, men. I shot because it was fun and made me feel great. I shot because I was fascinated watching the painting bleed and die…’— Niki de Saint Phalle. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Jun 12, 2015 - 10 comments

Lights, Camera, Action

Video Essayist Jacob T. Swinney edited 3 dozen supercuts, many of which went viral on Slate and indieWire: Each tackling a single motif from recent movies: The Jonathan Demme Close-Up, Hearing Tarantino (or Paul Thomas Anderson), A Rorschach Test from The Master, Movies’ First and Last Shots, Etc. All 36 videos are on his Vimeo page. Among them is his own 2014 demo reel.
posted by growabrain on Jun 11, 2015 - 1 comment

Right On That, Rose!

Initially panned by critics and a failure at the box office, Don't Tell Mom The Babysitter's Dead has found a second life as a cult favorite.
posted by reenum on Jun 9, 2015 - 19 comments

Le cinéma est une invention sans avenir

Lumière and Company was a project realised in 1995 to mark the centenary of the Lumière brothers’ first movies. Forty directors were given the use of a restored Lumière Cinematograph and asked to make a film under 1895-style constraints: (1) the films could be no longer than 52 seconds; (2) no synchronized sound was permitted; (3) no more than three takes were allowed. Any editing had to be done in-camera. Nearly all of the completed shorts have been compiled into a YouTube playlist. Please note that some of the clips contain nudity: treat this post as NSFW. Les Frères Lumière previously: 1, 2. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Jun 2, 2015 - 9 comments

A Masterpiece of Modern… Trial and Error

Rejected poster designs by Saul Bass for ‘The Shining’, with Stanley Kubrick’s notes
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jun 1, 2015 - 15 comments

Good evening. Please watch the following very, very carefully...

Every Alfred Hitchcock cameo ever in his own films.
posted by jim in austin on May 27, 2015 - 18 comments

"But you did a great job of making me feel safe."

hey girl: you can use my shoulder as a rifle stand, as you’re the better shot of the two of us. (feminist mad max tumblr)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 27, 2015 - 176 comments

The Empathetic Camera

Frank Norris and the Invention of Film Editing: "At the heart of American author Frank Norris’ gritty turn-of-the-century fiction lies an essential engagement with the everyday shock and violence of modernity. Henry Giardina explores how this focus, combined with his unique approach to storytelling, helped to pave the way for a truly filmic style."
posted by Rumple on May 20, 2015 - 2 comments

Sucker Punch: The Music Video

Just how many Sci-Fi / Action movie references are in Taylor Swift's new video "Bad Blood"? IO9 attempts to make a tally of them all.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on May 18, 2015 - 81 comments

IF YOU CAN’T CRY YOU’RE A LIABILITY

So you gotta go for it. Just do me a favor and FUCK SOME SHIT UP. Surprise yourself, wake up your actors, get wild with your performances, try shit, put in that funky dialogue you’re embarrassed of, in fact, rub your fucked-up-ness all over your scripts, add some shame and embarrassment and glee, and then dare yourself to shoot it, SERIOUSLY, go big or go home -- be a creature unlike any other.
Transparent creator Jill Soloway gave an amazing speech full of advice for women in filmmaking a few days ago.
posted by mokin on May 18, 2015 - 6 comments

Someone needs a hug... and some cash... and maybe a doctor...

William H. Macy Is Cinema's Number One Loser (SLYT)
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Apr 29, 2015 - 23 comments

"Man of Steel" has 99 problems, but he just solved one.

What if Man of Steel was in color? (SLYT)
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Apr 24, 2015 - 65 comments

Acid In The Coliseum

"When Tony Scott took his own life in 2012, we lost an unquestionably significant filmmaker. Some dwelled on the whys of his demise (thus leading to the rumor that the man was dying of terminal cancer when he jumped from San Pedro’s Vincent Thomas Bridge), but ultimately none of that matters one bit. Scott was a genius behind the camera, leaving behind a filmography that was unified in tone and consistently flat out entertaining. It’s a shame that his pictures have been regularly dismissed as nothing more than hollow diversions; mindless drivel meant for mass consumption and disposal. While their appeal is most certainly broad, there’s nothing vapid about them." - Acid In The Coliseum: The Films Of Tony Scott [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Apr 15, 2015 - 17 comments

Steal only from the best.

Tony Zhou has quickly become a favorite here at Metafilter for his video essays on film techniques. His latest work is part editing class / part confessional on the subject of video essays themselves. And it all involves Star Wars, South Park and, most of all, Orson Welles' "F for Fake" (previously and previously).
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Apr 7, 2015 - 6 comments

Senses of Cinema on two Jean-Pierre Melville classics

Senses of Cinema on two Jean-Pierre Melville classics: Temenuga Trifonova on Le Samouraï and Brian L. Frye on Bob le flambeur
posted by juv3nal on Mar 24, 2015 - 4 comments

First and final frames

This video plays the opening and closing shots of 55 films side-by-side. Some of the opening shots are strikingly similar to the final shots, while others are vastly different--both serving a purpose in communicating various themes. Some show progress, some show decline, and some are simply impactful images used to begin and end a film. [Obvious spoilers for the final shots of the 55 movies listed in the video's description]
posted by mediareport on Mar 19, 2015 - 18 comments

Five best moments

A nice collection of "Five best moments" at The Guardian:
"Each week readers help us pick five highlights from an actor's film career"
posted by growabrain on Mar 13, 2015 - 15 comments

"Sweet Summer Rain: Like God's Own Mercy."

Character actor Daniel Von Bargen ("Seinfeld", "Lord of Illusions", "Super Troopers") has died at the age of 64. One tragic footnote is his 2012 suicide attempt that led to his long illness. Here are some facts about Diabetes and Depression and, as always, there is help for those who need it. (Post Title Quote here)
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Mar 4, 2015 - 15 comments

Brother From Another Planet

“I’m always surprised to see what I do,” Jean-Luc Godard admits at the beginning of a talk delivered, nearly four decades ago, at Concordia University in Montreal. Could the single most influential filmmaker of his generation, who is still a provocateur at age 84, possibly be as baffled as we? [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Feb 28, 2015 - 7 comments

I turn my back on you: black movie poster art

"Foregrounding the back of Martin Luther King’s head, Selma’s poster is an act of protest in itself. But as a recent book on black movie poster art shows, many past poster designs have obscured, caricatured or edited out black actors altogether." Isabel Stevens writes on black movie poster art at the British Film Institute (BFI).
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Feb 24, 2015 - 9 comments

No, "Twilight" doesn't count...

Inspired by the recent release of What We Do In The Shadows, the staff over at The Dissolve take a look at one of the more unusual movie sub-genres: Vampire comedies.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Feb 18, 2015 - 62 comments

So, um... Happy Valentines Day, I guess...

Put down the boom box: 28 romantic gestures from Film, Television and Music that are actually creepy (SingleLinkAVClub)
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Feb 11, 2015 - 105 comments

These effects are too important for me to allow you to jeopardize them

Kubricks' 2001: One Man's Incredible Odyssey - "With today's article I've decided to cover the truly outstanding visual effects and design work from one of the single most influential and remarkable pieces of cinema of the twentieth century - Stanley Kubricks' 2001-A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968) - a film that just gets better and better with the passing years"
posted by a lungful of dragon on Feb 6, 2015 - 35 comments

Of course I’m a classics teacher. There’s a Parthenon behind my head.

The Jennifer Lopez vehicle "The Boy Next Door" opened this past weekend and earned a paltry 12% on the Tomatometer. There's nothing terribly unique about this number deep in the cinematic dumping ground that is January, but people are quickly taking notice on how absolutely bonkers the film really is. This starts with the trailer and then moves on to the film itself, which is that rare beast in this era of boring SyFy Channel schlock: A bad movie that never stops being fun. If you need further convincing, witness one moment from the film that was recently singled out by Slate. It's a thing of beauty.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jan 26, 2015 - 117 comments

It's difficult to improve upon perfection

It may have taken him over ten years to do it, but Tommy Wiseau has finally followed up on his cult hit "The Room" (previously). "The Neighbors" originally existed as some rarely seen footage Wiseau shot in 2004 (only the wacky trailer was ever released to the public). Cut to ten years later when a newly shot pilot for a "Neighbors" TV series (Official website and trailer) has been making the rounds in big cities across the country to give Wiseau fans the follow up they have been craving. Both the Gothamist and the AV Club weigh in on the show (with a bonus AV Club interview with Wiseau).
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jan 8, 2015 - 35 comments

R.I.P. Edward Herrmann

Tony and Emmy winning actor Edward Herrmann, who is perhaps best known for his role as Lorelai's father in "Gilmore Girls", has passed away from brain cancer at the age of 71. His recent role as the voice of Franklin Roosevelt in Ken Burns' documentary "The Roosevelts" ironically brought him full circle to his breakout portrayal of FDR in the miniseries "Eleanor and Franklin" nearly forty years ago.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Dec 31, 2014 - 57 comments

There Will Be Tracking Shots

Given that Paul Thomas Anderson's "Inherent Vice" opens in two days, what a great time to explore... "The Career of Paul Thomas Anderson in Five Shots"
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Dec 10, 2014 - 36 comments

Andy, why are you making these films? It's easier to do than painting.

The Making of an Underground Film, originally broadcast on CBS News with Walter Cronkite on New Years' Eve 1965, begins with reporter Dave Dugan saying, "Not everyone digs underground movies, but those who do can dig 'em here." in front of the Bridge Theatre in New York City's Greenwich Village. An interview with avant-garde filmmaker and exhibitor Jonas Mekas then segues into footage of the making of Dirt by filmmaker/poet Piero Heliczer, as a pre-Nico incarnation of the Velvet Underground (with both Maureen Tucker and original percussionist Angus MacLise) plays silently in costume in the background. Other highlights include interviews with Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick, plus the uninterrupted airing of a Stan Brakhage film in tribute to poet Michael McClure.
posted by jonp72 on Dec 6, 2014 - 2 comments

Out of the Past (and Present)

Eric Rosenberg is a graphic designer that got his start twenty years ago helping to create the distinctive look of The Hudsucker Proxy. His website features some of his work over the years on films including Fight Club, The Truman Show, Almost Famous, Dreamgirls and a whole lot more.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Dec 6, 2014 - 6 comments

Gritty, not glossy: 70s films

"Why were American movies so much better in the 1970s than in the decades since — and most of the decades before? Simple. Our movies then were not as inhibited by censorship (self-imposed) as they were prior to the '60s.

"And they were not as obsessed with huge box office grosses and commercial values as they became afterward — following the stunning financial success of those two '70s superhits, 'Jaws' (1975) and 'Star Wars' (1977). Instead, during most of the '60s and '70s — liberated both by the collapse of the old studio system strictures and by the greater acceptance of film as art from critics and audiences — American filmmakers of all generations, from Martin Scorsese ('Mean Streets') and Hal Ashby ('Harold and Maude') to Sidney Lumet ('Dog Day Afternoon') and Mike Nichols ('Carnal Knowledge') to Alfred Hitchcock ('Frenzy') and Billy Wilder ('Avanti'), tried things they wouldn't have dared in the decades past. More often than not, they succeeded." (Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 5, 2014 - 285 comments

Seven great movies expiring from Netflix on December 1st

"Every month, Netflix quietly clears its virtual shelves to prepare for the arrival of new offerings. There are roughly 80 movies expiring from Netflix Instant at the end of November. We've picked seven that we think you should make sure to watch before they’re no longer streaming – one for each night until Dec. 1." (Paste Magazine)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 24, 2014 - 86 comments

"Plastics."

Legendary director Mike Nichols, who made an incredible debut nearly fifty years ago with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and then managed to follow that up with The Graduate, has died at the age of 83. Younger audiences may also know him for The Birdcage, the HBO miniseries Angels in America and his last film Charlie Wilson's War.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Nov 20, 2014 - 65 comments

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