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28 posts tagged with clay.
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The Only Miracle Jesus' Mother Asked For Was Wine

How New World Wine Resurrects Old Religion
I used to be a regular at a wine bar in San Clemente, a beach town in California where my wife and I lived when we were first married. The ‘Tuscan’ decor of the place was a little too vivid for my taste, but the wine was priced right and the owner was a great conversationalist. He would tell us stories from behind the bar about his travels to vineyards in Chile and New Zealand, and he had a charming populist streak. When people got too pretentious about the wine, he would roll his eyes and say: ‘Relax, it’s just a beverage.’ He was wrong about that, of course. Since its invention more than 8,000 years ago, wine has always been more than just a beverage.

posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 16, 2014 - 11 comments

Odd leaves from the life of a Louisiana "swamp doctor" (circa 1850)

One of the most intriguing personalities in Southern medical history of the nineteenth century is Dr. Henry Clay Lewis (1825-1850), whose fame rests not on his accomplishments in medicine, but upon his humorous writings published under the pseudonym "Madison Tensas, M.D., the Louisiana Swamp Doctor." Though Lewis was a practicing doctor, his true identity as the author of the "Southern grotesque" (previously) pieces was not known until after his death. His works pre-dated the Southern Gothic style (prev), and are unusual for their time in that "[Lewis] presents his black characters with as much pain and grotesqueness as his white characters, steering away from the time's usual stereotypes." You can read a longer biography and a summary of his style here, or just dive in and read his works, which available online in Odd leaves from the life of a Louisiana "swamp doctor", which was also published as The swamp doctor's adventures in the South-west (also available with fourteen illustrations) on Archive.org.
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 20, 2014 - 6 comments

Mesmerized by the Potter's Wheel

Mikhail Sadovnikov uses his clay, his hands, and a potter's wheel to draw you into his spinning world of music and improvisation. [15:25] [more inside]
posted by ob1quixote on Mar 22, 2014 - 14 comments

May The Source Be With You

Aitken's recent work "The Source" (2012) explores the root of creativity. Six projections in a pavilion designed by David Adjaye, cycle through many more interviews with artists, architects, and musicians such as Adjaye, Liz Diller, William Eggleston, Philippe Parreno, Paolo Soleri, Tilda Swinton, and Beck among others. Wikipedia [more inside]
posted by QuakerMel on Mar 4, 2014 - 0 comments

He's smiling cause he's full of vodka.

What if you performed clay forensic facial reconstruction on a bottle of Crystal Skull Vodka?
posted by The Whelk on Feb 17, 2014 - 45 comments

Measure of a Man

2003 American Idol runner-up Clay Aiken is running for Congress in North Carolina. Aiken is a long-time political activist, and his campaign seems serious and sincere, as shown by the heartfelt five-minute video announcing his campaign. But the odds are against him in a district which voted for Romney by a twelve-point margin, and being a gay father is a possible liability in a state which recently voted to ban gay marriage. (But of course, electing entertainers to political office is an American tradition.)
posted by showbiz_liz on Feb 6, 2014 - 55 comments

PORCELAINia

PORCELAINia. A short documentary about artist and scientist Bobby Jaber. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Aug 4, 2013 - 5 comments

The wheels on the bus go meow meow meow...

My Cat is a Bus. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Dec 5, 2012 - 34 comments

It's been a good run.

It's touched the hearts of all sorts of people, but after twenty-four years, the final issue of Nintendo Power is here. One thing's for sure: if the cover doesn't make you feel all kinds of fuzzical nostalgia, then the doctors have called to say that you're dead inside and it's clear that your life is a god damn mess.
posted by DoctorFedora on Dec 1, 2012 - 68 comments

"Escalation Techniques"

How child molesters get away with it. 'Jerry Sandusky and the Mind of a Pedophile,' by Malcolm Gladwell. Some may find the descriptions within the article disturbing. Via.
posted by zarq on Sep 17, 2012 - 44 comments

"All that happens to us, including our humiliations, our misfortunes, our embarrassments, all is given to us as raw material, as clay, so that we may shape our art." ~ Jorge Luis Borges

200,000 Clay Figures: British sculptor Antony Gormley is well-known for his life-size sculptures that creatively mimic the human body, but the figurative clay mounds from his series titled Field, though not as accurate in depicting mankind's form, holds deeper value for the artist. Gormley says of this project, "I wanted to work with people and to make a work about our collective future and our responsibility for it. I wanted the art to look back at us, its makers (and later viewers), as if we were responsible - responsible for the world that it [FIELD] and we were in." [Previously] [Previously]
posted by Fizz on May 1, 2012 - 14 comments

Asterisk-Eating Ball is cute!

Here are a variety of strange creatures, realized by the surreal Swiss mime troupe Mummenschanz: 1 2 3 4 5 Previously, and Muppetly. MLYT
posted by JHarris on Dec 30, 2011 - 16 comments

"Clay and many magazine people told me not to include a lesbian article in the first issue—and so, of course, we did."

The December 20, 1971 issue of New York Magazine came bundled with a 40-page preview of the first periodical created, owned, and operated entirely by women. The first issue sold out in eight days. 40 years later, New York Magazine interviews Gloria Steinem and the women who launched Ms. Magazine. (single page version.) From the same issue: How the Blogosphere Has Transformed the Feminist Conversation [more inside]
posted by zarq on Oct 31, 2011 - 11 comments

Phillippe Faraut

Philippe Faraut, realist sculptor, has a couple of interesting videos on Youtube ... one shows the effects of the aging process, another shows the effects of meth, and a third shows the effects of insanity. [more inside]
posted by crunchland on May 15, 2011 - 12 comments

It doesn't mean gold, it means thousand!

You've read the press release, watched the video, and checked out the how-to blog. You, too, could follow in the tracks of the Space Squid folks by publishing your prose in clay tablets, immortalising it for the ages.
posted by rodgerd on Aug 24, 2010 - 11 comments

Loopy Boopy

Colleen lives in New Orleans and makes strange dolls out of polymer clay. She has a blog and an Etsy shop. Here's a short interview. See also Art Dolls Only and the Travelling Doll Project.
posted by cjorgensen on Oct 12, 2009 - 21 comments

Pimp my (board) game

Geeky? Crafty? Got some time on your hands? Make your own boardgame pieces! Tutorials for making custom 3-d Settlers of Catan tiles (and gorgeous custom sets here, and here, although with no instructions,alas). Agricola more your style? Grab some polymer clay and get making resources, more resources, food, sheep, more sheep, boars, cattle, and (of course) farmers, farmers, farmers, farmers, farmers, and farmers. Don't forget fences, tiles, and a starting player piece. Lots more in the image gallery at BoardGameGeek.
posted by arcticwoman on Mar 2, 2009 - 15 comments

Art is everywhere

Mingei is a transcultural word which combines the Japanese words for all people (Min) and art (Gei). The site has a flash interface and features over 5,000 high resolution, zoomable objects. More information on the Mingei Movement.
posted by tellurian on Jan 27, 2009 - 13 comments

The devil went down to Georgia - Claymation Video Add as favorite

Absolutely amazing claymation video of Charlie Daniels' "The devil went down to Georgia".
posted by rageagainsttherobots on Jan 8, 2009 - 60 comments

organizing without organizations

Clay Shirky, professor at ITP - NYU, often linked to at MeFi, presents at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet & Society on the ideas in his new book on organizing without organizations. [more inside]
posted by gen on Mar 25, 2008 - 5 comments

The Hello Experiment

The Hello Experiment
posted by lemonfridge on Jul 22, 2007 - 35 comments

Ocarina Time!

Want to make your own ocarina? Fair enough; a bit of clay goes a long way. But the legends say that only a true master can construct them out of broccoli or carrots.
posted by Greg Nog on May 21, 2007 - 25 comments

Mona Lisa Descending a Staircase

Mona Lisa and other classics in clay animation. Joan C. Gratz is the talented artist behind this and other projects. This particular short film won an academy award for best animated short film in 1992. I am surprised to have never viewed it before today. Wikipedia has next to nothing on Gratz or her works.
posted by jkafka on Aug 14, 2006 - 6 comments

feats of clay

Feats of Clay :An ice kiln. English Puzzle mugs. Zilliz geometrical tiles. And tons of cool ceramics related articles from Ceramics Today. [via]
posted by dhruva on Sep 12, 2005 - 9 comments

Pongomania

Pongomania: one person's imagination and obession with toy modeling clay.
posted by mathowie on Oct 20, 2003 - 14 comments

Map-making for fun and profit! How would you like to be born on Buttlickin Ave? Is this for real? Or Someone messing with yahoo's map software? Inquiring minds want to know!
posted by Maxor on Oct 16, 2002 - 36 comments

Okaaaaaaaaaaaay Daaaaaaaaaavey!

Okaaaaaaaaaaaay Daaaaaaaaaavey! After a 31 year absence, Davey and Goliath are making their return to television. It's funny, I had no idea it was religious programming until years after I stopped watching it. Oh, and this news explains explains those great Mountain Dew ads...
posted by chumptastic on Aug 7, 2002 - 12 comments

The Poincaré Conjecture: If we stretch a rubber band around the surface of an apple, then we can shrink it down to a point by moving it slowly, without tearing it and without allowing it to leave the surface. On the other hand, if we imagine that the same rubber band has somehow been stretched in the appropriate direction around a doughnut, then there is no way of shrinking it to a point without breaking either the rubber band or the doughnut. We say the the surface of the apple is ‘simply connected,’ but that the surface of the doughnut is not. Poincaré, almost a hundred years ago, knew that a two dimensional sphere is essentially characterized by this property of simple connectivity, and asked the corresponding question for the three dimensional sphere (the set of points in four dimensional space at unit distance from the origin). This question turned out be be extraordinarily difficult, and mathematicians have been struggling with it ever since.

...but if you can prove it, [or any of six other 'millenium prize problems'] the clay mathematics institute wants to line your pockets with $1M
posted by palegirl on May 24, 2000 - 3 comments

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