132 posts tagged with code.
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A QA Engineer walks into a B͏̴͡͡Ą̛Ŗ̴

The Big List of Naughty Strings is a Github repository containing a long list of hypothetical user inputs that can potentially wreck havoc on a computer program, including SQL Injection, malformed and evil HTML, stupid Unicode gimmicks, or innocuous phrases that look like profanity.
posted by schmod on Aug 21, 2015 - 27 comments

In-valid user

In 2012 the genetics company 23andme gave web app developers the ability to create app mashups with DNA information. Most apps help users add genetics to their electronic health record, or connect with relatives, or explore risk factors for diseases. Two days ago a new webapp did something different: it showed how to only let white people in. [more inside]
posted by Monochrome on Jul 22, 2015 - 59 comments

What is Code? said jesting ftrain

Paul Ford (yes, yes, MeFi's Own) has created a juggernaut of an article / lived experience / beautiful time-sink about coding. At this point I'll shut up so you can pack a lunch and go immerse yourself now.
posted by maudlin on Jun 11, 2015 - 95 comments

HoTT Coq

Univalent Foundations Redefines Mathematics - "When a legendary mathematician found a mistake in his own work, he embarked on a computer-aided quest to eliminate human error. To succeed, he has to rewrite the century-old rules underlying all of mathematics." (previously) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jun 9, 2015 - 13 comments


The Taman Shud case has been one of the world's great unsolved mysteries. Is an amateur enthusiast now on the verge of finally cracking the case? [more inside]
posted by Chrysostom on Jun 5, 2015 - 53 comments


The Singing Sailor Underwater Defense System - the Swedish Peace and Arbitration Society sends out a message of peace, love, understanding and respect to Russian submariners cruising through the Stockholm archepelago
posted by a lungful of dragon on May 12, 2015 - 8 comments

If you learn by doing, this is for you.

Code4startup is an online resource that lets you clone and hack copies of real services you already use on the web to make something new and cool You have an idea and want to quickly build your own web app for startup? Code4startup throws you into the deep end of the pool of established services, TaskRabbit, Udemy, AirBnb, Fiverr... explains how they are constructed with various technologies and then lets you bang on the code of these to make something new and cool for yourself. Angular JS, Bootstrap, Wufoo, ChromeDeveloperTools, Rails... and more to come.
posted by bobdow on Mar 26, 2015 - 36 comments


Why do the three-letter codes for so many American airports end in "X"? How do you tell all the "Yxx" codes for Canadian airport codes apart? Where is SUX, again? Why are you flying into FCA? Airport Codes is a gorgeous, yet informative guide to the mysteries behind your favorite (or least favorite) airport code.
posted by heurtebise on Mar 18, 2015 - 66 comments

My dear sons, learn eloquence.

Beginning in 1808, a young man begins keeping a secret, ciphered journal of his life with terse detail of his days. Astronomical observations, interpersonal relationships (to put it mildly), weather notes, and the minutiae of a planter's life in 19th Century North Carolina were collected into these volumes that were nearly lost, decoded in 1979 and mostly forgotten again. The Coded Life of William Thomas Prestwood.
posted by 1f2frfbf on Mar 4, 2015 - 19 comments

I Have Created 50 Games This Year

Kenta Cho of ABA Games has released 50 minigames this year. They are all free to play on his site, with source. [more inside]
posted by 23 on Dec 15, 2014 - 25 comments

What if we could just *draw* the code?

Over the years, there have been many visual programming languages, where code is represented in images. Perhaps the most successful, with estimates of over 200,000 licenses, is the engineering and scientific language LabVIEW (an acronym for Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench). Originally released by National Instruments in 1986 for the Macintosh, LabVIEW features dataflow programming, real-time, embedded, FPGA, multi-platform and even LEGO targets, an LLVM compiler, automated multithreading, and the extensive ecosystem one expects from a nearly 30 year old language.

One of LabVIEW's most distinguishing features, though, is how much people hate it. [more inside]
posted by underflow on Dec 7, 2014 - 74 comments

Diversity within us comes out better when there's diversity in our team.

The most recent episode of the Ruby Rogues podcast — #179 Accountability and Diversity with Meagan Waller — is a treasure trove of insights and info about unconscious biases, diversity, employment, culture, tech, and more. The podcast page features a timestamped topic outline of the discussion, as well as many links to the Ruby community websites, projects, studies, conferences, and controversies they discuss… [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Nov 3, 2014 - 5 comments

I Can Tell By The Pixels

Visualizing Algorithms shows you how computer algorithms can be represented visually, leading to better understanding of how the algorithms work:

"Have you ever implemented an algorithm based on formal description? It can be hard! Being able to see what your code is doing can boost productivity. Visualization does not supplant the need for tests, but tests are useful primarily for detecting failure and not explaining it. Visualization can also discover unexpected behavior in your implementation, even when the output looks correct."
posted by quiet earth on Jun 26, 2014 - 29 comments

Eigendemocracy: crowd-sourced deliberative democracy

Scott Aaronson on building a 'PageRank' for (eigen)morality and (eigen)trust - "Now, would those with axes to grind try to subvert such a system the instant it went online? Certainly. For example, I assume that millions of people would rate Conservapedia as a more trustworthy source than Wikipedia—and would rate other people who had done so as, themselves, trustworthy sources, while rating as untrustworthy anyone who called Conservapedia untrustworthy. So there would arise a parallel world of trust and consensus and 'expertise', mutually-reinforcing yet nearly disjoint from the world of the real. But here's the thing: anyone would be able to see, with the click of a mouse, the extent to which this parallel world had diverged from the real one." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jun 23, 2014 - 45 comments

Automatic Supercut Script

Videogrep is a python script that searches through dialog in videos and then cuts together a new video based on what it finds. Basically, it’s a command-line “supercut” generator. The code is on github
posted by The Whelk on Jun 20, 2014 - 15 comments


Stop Writing JavaScript Frameworks! And stop using them too!
posted by blue_beetle on May 25, 2014 - 45 comments

Artist's Notebook: Ramsey Nasser

"Arabic programming languages with the honest goal of bringing coding to a non-Latin culture have been attempted in the past, but have failed without exception. What makes my piece قلب different is that its primary purpose was to illustrate how impossible coding in anything but English has become."
posted by invitapriore on May 5, 2014 - 46 comments

Black and White and Code All Over

hiddenenigma is an Instagram account featuring daily monochrome experiments created with the Processing library, currently on day 110 and going for 365.
posted by 23 on Apr 20, 2014 - 4 comments


Two of these Java class names from the Spring framework are made up. One of them is real. Can you guess the real one?
posted by schmod on Apr 18, 2014 - 60 comments

A SAT Attack on the Erdos Discrepancy Conjecture

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can't check - "A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it's talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia's pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm." (via; previously ;)
posted by kliuless on Apr 12, 2014 - 24 comments

[spoon icon] [glass of milk icon] [ Ovaltine jar icon]

Someone is leaving what appear to be coded messages in the stacks of Weldon Library at the University of Western Ontario. (via)
posted by Horace Rumpole on Mar 25, 2014 - 63 comments

"Give me LI-berty or take the blinking phone out."

"In the mid-20th century, in response to the United States’ rapidly expanding telephone network, executives at the Bell System introduced a new way of dialing the phone. Until then, for the most part, it was human operators — mostly women — who had directed calls to their destinations." The new system, which eliminated letters from phone numbers and set the stage for an automated national (and eventually international) dialing system. was met with a minor rebellion against "creeping numeralism." The Atlantic examines "Our Numbered Days: The Evolution of the Area Code." [more inside]
posted by zarq on Feb 23, 2014 - 99 comments

How Do You Code?

How Do You Code? [via mefi projects]
posted by oceanjesse on Feb 11, 2014 - 81 comments


DevArt: An exhibition of art created with code - skywriting quadcopter drones programmed with c++, room dividers reimagined as 3D screens for psychedelic projections, using raspberry pi to rename WiFi networks as lines of poetry. They are collaborating with the Barbican in London for the Digital Revolution exhibition and are currently seeking an emerging creative coder to be funded to present at the exhibition alongside world-class interactive artists Zach Lieberman, Karsten Schmidt, and the duo of Varvara Guljajeva & Mar Canet.
posted by divabat on Feb 6, 2014 - 2 comments

Programming stories

For your Sunday reading, a couple of stories of ye olden computing days: Why MacPaint's Original Canvas was 416 Pixels Wide and A Great Old Timey Game Programming Hack.
posted by curious nu on Jan 5, 2014 - 29 comments

Dark Incantations In Corrupt Languages

Produce the number 2014 without any numbers in your source codeWrite a program that always outputs “2012” - even if it's modified!Obfuscated Hello WorldPrint your code backwards - reverse quineShortest code to print a smiley faceWrite the shortest program that generates the most compiler warnings and errors [more inside]
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jan 5, 2014 - 16 comments

It doesn't track IP addresses

Source Code in TV and Films reveals what the code for that GUI interface in Visual Basic is really for.
posted by griphus on Jan 4, 2014 - 89 comments

Every customer has a name, but custRec is a database record

Introduction to Abject-Oriented Programming. (via /. embedded link) [more inside]
posted by JoeXIII007 on Oct 16, 2013 - 38 comments

Edit by 04882 joel backdoor

Some D-Link routers have a simple back door in their firmware.
posted by curious nu on Oct 13, 2013 - 61 comments

Hexagonal Grids

Hexagonal Grids. For when you have a game that needs grids that are made of hexagons.
posted by curious nu on Jun 2, 2013 - 30 comments

Computerized Math, Formal Proofs and Alternative Logic

Using computer systems for doing mathematical proofs - "With the proliferation of computer-assisted proofs that are all but impossible to check by hand, Hales thinks computers must become the judge." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Mar 16, 2013 - 25 comments

And for this, I am no longer nothing, I am more

Best. Javascript. Comments. EVER.
posted by eustacescrubb on Feb 7, 2013 - 58 comments


10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10 (a collaborative book by Nick Montfort, Patsy Baudoin, John Bell, Ian Bogost (previously, previously, previously), Jeremy Douglass, Mark C. Marino, Michael Mateas (of Facade), Casey Reas, Mark Sample and Noah Vawter) uses a single line of code as a basis for pontificating on creative computing and the impact of software in popular culture. 10 PRINT's content is available as a PDF (50 MB). Pictures via Casey Reas' Flickr.
posted by mrgrimm on Nov 29, 2012 - 47 comments

Menace(s) to Society

During the Golden Age of Hollywood and until 1967, mainstream movie studios were banned by the Production Code from depicting taboo topics like drug addiction, explicit murder and venereal disease, or even showing explicit nudity. But in the 1930's and 1940's, films marketed as "educational" could and did fly under the radar, and three of the best known 'educational' propaganda exploitation films are: Sex Madness (1935), Reefer Madness (1936) and The Cocaine Fiends (1938). [more inside]
posted by zarq on Oct 15, 2012 - 30 comments

Cats Who Code

Khan Academy unveils its new interactive Computer Science learning platform. More coder resources: Free Tech Books, WiBit.net, Google Code University, the W3C's Web Standards Curriculum, a Beginner's Guide to HTML & CSS, and codepen.io, a social sandbox for web design.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Aug 14, 2012 - 26 comments

New Programming Jargon

This is just the top 30, what I consider to be the most likely candidates for actual new programming jargon based on community upvotes, not just "funny thing that another programmer typed on a webpage and I felt compelled to upvote for hilarity". Because that would be Reddit. Coding Horror presents the top 30 Stack Overflow New Programming Jargon entries.
posted by Artw on Jul 20, 2012 - 66 comments

The Codeless Code

The Codeless Code. An illustrated collection of (sometimes violent) fables, concerning the Art and Philosophy of software development [more inside]
posted by Deathalicious on Jul 3, 2012 - 62 comments

[] Brackets

Brackets - An open source code editor for the web
posted by Artw on Jun 26, 2012 - 58 comments

Turing's 100th Birthday

Happy 100th birthday, Alan Turing! 2012 is the Alan Turing Year, with celebratory academic events around the world all year. BBC News has a set of (brief) appreciations, including one in which two of Turing's colleagues share memories. Google has an interactive Doodle of a Turing Machine today (that article has some explanation and links to a useful video if the doodle's confusing). [more inside]
posted by LobsterMitten on Jun 22, 2012 - 27 comments

Bad day for Oracle

Following a jury finding that Google had not infiringed upon Oracles patents, a development described as a near disaster for the database company, Judge William Aslup has ruled that the Java APIs cannot be copyrighted. That leaves Oracle with only the 9 lines of rangeCheck code and a handfull of decompiled test files to show for the massivecourt case. CEO Larry Ellison remains confident, claiming that the aquisition of Java creator Sun has still paid for itself.
posted by Artw on Jun 1, 2012 - 45 comments

Guardian feature on the future of computing education in UK

The Guardian has a feature today on computer science education in the UK It includes short interviews with teenagers who use coding (for fun or work), an article on encouraging girls to get involved in computer science, an editorial encouraging an overhaul of the UK's system of teaching computing, and some discussion of Young Rewired State, a group that offers "festivals of code" to help kids learn to "program the world around them", and also encouraging use of open data.
posted by chapps on Mar 31, 2012 - 19 comments

Do or !do. There is no _why.

"Vitamin R goes straight to the head. Ruby will teach you to express your ideas through a computer. You will be writing stories for a machine. The language will become a tool for you to better connect your mind to the world." Slate compiles the mystery of _why. (Previously).
posted by oulipian on Mar 15, 2012 - 78 comments

Few Examples of Lisp Code Typography

Few Examples of Lisp Code Typography. From 1953 to 2012. (Via Lambda the Ultimate.)
posted by skynxnex on Mar 11, 2012 - 39 comments


What's a JavaScript Closure? Ever wonder about some of JavaScript's more advanced and esoteric features? Nathan Whitehead's interactive tutorial explains and walks through each of these concepts one step at a time. At the end of each lesson, you are encouraged to write short snippets of code demonstrating the concepts that you just learned, which are then automatically checked for errors and verified.

Perhaps you're new to JavaScript, or programming in general; CodeAcademy offers similar interactive tutorials that will teach you the basics, and hold your hand along the way. Perhaps you'd rather learn at a more even pace; CodeAcademy's CodeYear will introduce you to one new concept every week throughout 2012. [more inside]
posted by schmod on Jan 20, 2012 - 42 comments


Today, NASA goes open source with its code, joining endeavours such as SpaceHack [previously], WorldWind and (for more worldly coders) Github, GoogleCode, and the venerable SourceForge.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Jan 8, 2012 - 11 comments

At Play In Fields Of Hex

Released yesterday, dabblet joins an array of live sandbox tools designed to prototype, test and share webcode that includes JSFiddle and CSSDesk, while bringing some advantages of its own.
Other useful resources: w3clove validates an entire site, rather than page-by-page; JQuery Air teaches you how to use the framework directly in the browser; domain.nr finds clever TLDs for your site, and Sequel Pro is a nice, free, native, open source MySQL editor for OS X. If you’re more the old-school dead-tree type, there’s always The Manual.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Dec 16, 2011 - 9 comments

Codebreakers Of The World Unite!

Can You Crack It?
posted by veedubya on Dec 1, 2011 - 55 comments


repl.it is an online environment for interactively exploring programming languages. Supported languages.
posted by juv3nal on Sep 20, 2011 - 21 comments

"We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow / And watch where the chalk-white arrows go"

Where the sidewalk ends: A new walking code of conduct, 10 proposed rules for New York City sidewalks.
posted by Fizz on Aug 18, 2011 - 142 comments

404: Page Not Found

The most exciting and ridiculous 404 page you'll ever see [via]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 2, 2011 - 51 comments

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