53 posts tagged with coding.
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taking DDR to the next level

taro4012 makes Stepmania/DDR games that really push the limits of the rhythm-game genre. The UK Sight Reading Tournament series (the latest being Version 8) incorporates mini games and an overarching plot, while HBT experiments with the step-game hardware, such as pressure-sensitive game pads. A major highlight of taro4012's work is adapting Undertale to the Stepmania format - which for spoiler reasons and due to the lack of an established playlist will be placed [more inside]
posted by divabat on Sep 9, 2016 - 9 comments


Margaret Hamilton's source code for Apollo 11 on Github! The extraordinary code from the original Apollo 11 guidance computer has been converted to .s files for syntax highlighting and posted to Github. The project was undertaken by Virtual AGC and the MIT Museum. [more inside]
posted by jasper411 on Jul 12, 2016 - 22 comments

Autism, employment and tech

"Autism is seen like some sort of mental superpower where we can see math in the air. In my experience, this isn’t really the case." - Dispelling some myths about the autistic wunderkind programmer. Also: Why you might not want to get TOO excited about autism employment initiatives. Autism FAQ
posted by Artw on Jul 10, 2016 - 29 comments

"I want to build a robot that will make the streets of Paris happy"

Ten-year-old Eva writes a blog in French about things she does – such as triathlons – and learns – like the symbolism behind hopscotch (Le jeu de la marelle in French). She also writes about programming her fully open-source Thymio robot. She ran into some difficulty coding it, however, and with a usage goal in mind, she applied to the Paris Summer Innovation Fellowship, alongside urban designers, data scientists and hardware specialists. Her application was accepted. [more inside]
posted by fraula on Jun 29, 2016 - 16 comments

Playing with Blocks

In the late ’70s and ’80s, the arrival of personal computers like the Commodore 64 gave rise to the first generation of kids fluent in computation. They learned to program in Basic, to write software that they swapped excitedly with their peers. It was a playful renaissance that eerily parallels the embrace of Minecraft by today’s youth - Inside the Minecraft Generation.
posted by Artw on Apr 17, 2016 - 30 comments

A Surfeit of Sandboxes

You may be familiar with JSFiddle and CodePen, but there are similar tools for a variety of languages, some more practical than others. [more inside]
posted by jedicus on Apr 13, 2016 - 22 comments

We can look at each facial hair property returned by the Face API

Analysis of coder stereotypes by facial analysis of github profile pics, including an in-depth look at correlations with different kinds of facial hair.
posted by signal on Mar 10, 2016 - 25 comments

I've Got N Words For You:

"I've got eight words for you: I've got two words for you: Fuck off" A Python code implementation of the sequence presented by @extranapkins in this tweet.
posted by Greg Nog on Feb 10, 2016 - 24 comments

Your Code in Spaaace!

In the ISS there are two Astro Pi computers, Ed and Izzy, equipped with Sense HATs, two different camera modules (visual and IR), and stored in rather special cases. They are now running code written by UK school children - the winners of a competition. The data will be feeding back soon! [more inside]
posted by Stark on Feb 5, 2016 - 3 comments

Stepping out of the clown shoes

Libraries' Tech Pipeline Problem.
posted by solarion on Sep 2, 2015 - 26 comments

As Tech Booms, Workers Turn to Coding for Career Change

“Six figures, right off the bat,” Mr. Minton said. “To me, it was astonishing.” The average class length among the schools is just under 11 weeks, and costs $11,000. [more inside]
posted by mecran01 on Aug 5, 2015 - 79 comments

Programmed by N A S I R

It was common practice in the 8/16 bit era for Japanese programmers to use pseudonyms or abbreviations in the game's credits, so you might not have given too much thought to the name NASIR popping up in the credits for Rad Racer, Final Fantasy II or Secret of Mana. In fact, NASIR was just the first name of programmer Nasir Gebelli, an Iranian-American who first made his name programming ambitious games like Horizon V in the Apple II era. [more inside]
posted by selfnoise on Mar 23, 2015 - 10 comments

What can we do better as a community in these cases?

Coding Like a Girl - sailor mercury at Medium:
"Apparently, presenting as feminine makes you look like a beginner. It is very frustrating that I will either look like not a programmer or look like a permanent beginner because I have programmed since age 8. I have basically always wanted to be a programmer. I received undergrad and grad degrees from MIT. I’ve worked as a visiting researcher in Honda’s humanoid robotics division on machine learning algorithms for ASIMO.

"I don’t think that any of these things make me a better programmer; I list them because I am pretty sure that if i were a white man with these credentials or even less than these credentials no one would doubt my programmer status."
[more inside] posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 12, 2015 - 126 comments

I can only hope that they never decide to implement "lolreverts"

Sometimes a one-line text-only description of your git commits just isn't enough. For those types of scenarios there is software called "lolcommits" that is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux that, when enabled, takes a photo with your webcam every time you commit your code via git. Now you can really let your co-workers know how you feel about having to fix their whitespace issues all the time with just a simple facial expression. After the photo is taken, the git message is overlayed on top of the image is a style reminiscent of lolcats. The resulting image files are then stored locally in your home directory. [more inside]
posted by surazal on Feb 16, 2015 - 22 comments

To the west is a house, bricks fall from the sky, and there are zombies.

Wish you could make games but have no idea how you'd get started? Have you never coded a day in your life and feel overwhelmed trying to teach yourself? Can't draw anything beyond stick figures? Overwhelmed and don't know what questions to even ask? You're in luck! Sortingh.at is a tool that will give you personalized resources to help you get started making your first game, custom tailored to what you're actually making. (h/t)
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 2, 2015 - 15 comments

Why I Am Not a Maker

There’s a widespread idea that “People who make things are simply different [read: better] than those who don’t.” [...] It’s not, of course, that there’s anything wrong with making (although it’s not all that clear that the world needs more stuff). The problem is the idea that the alternative to making is usually not doing nothing—it’s almost always doing things for and with other people, from the barista to the Facebook community moderator to the social worker to the surgeon. Describing oneself as a maker—regardless of what one actually or mostly does—is a way of accruing to oneself the gendered, capitalist benefits of being a person who makes products. [more inside]
posted by haltingproblemsolved on Jan 24, 2015 - 116 comments

Hmm!! no compilation/linker error!!! Why is it so??

C puzzles - Dear visitor, Thanks for your interest in C programming. In this page, you will find a list of interesting C programming questions/puzzles. Not a huge list, but an interesting one.
posted by Wolfdog on Nov 15, 2014 - 28 comments

Diversity within us comes out better when there's diversity in our team.

The most recent episode of the Ruby Rogues podcast — #179 Accountability and Diversity with Meagan Waller — is a treasure trove of insights and info about unconscious biases, diversity, employment, culture, tech, and more. The podcast page features a timestamped topic outline of the discussion, as well as many links to the Ruby community websites, projects, studies, conferences, and controversies they discuss… [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Nov 3, 2014 - 5 comments

The Evil Part (may not be evil in all jurisdictions)

The 7th Underhanded C Competition. "The underhanded goal is this: write surveil() in such a way that the act of surveillance is subtly leaked to the user or to the outside world. PiuPiu can not reveal the act of surveillance, but your function is technically able to edit the Piu or user structure during scanning. Find a way to alter that data (this alone is a bit of a challenge, since you are not supposed to alter the data, just scan it) in such a way that an informed outsider can tell if someone is being archived. The leakage should be subtle enough that it is not easily noticed. As always, the code should appear simple, innocent, readable and obvious." [more inside]
posted by Sebmojo on Nov 3, 2014 - 30 comments

How Fast Can You Debug?

posted by boo_radley on Aug 21, 2014 - 37 comments

girls and technology!

WYNC's Manoush Zomorodi investigates the gender gap in tech and computer science, and finds a number of people working towards bridging that gap, from childhood to university: completely restructuring a required computer science course to make it more welcoming to female university students, celebrating women in computing history (and recognizing that computer science wasn't so male-dominated, and making children's books and toys (even dollhouses!) for kids to explore programming concepts on their own. She also noticed that the majority of female computer science students in the US had grown up overseas - possibly because computer science isn't a common subject in American high schools. This is slated to change: a new AP Computer Science subject is in the works, with efforts to get 10,000 highly-trained computer science teachers in 10,000 high schools across the US. If you want to join Mindy Kaling in supporting young girls entering computer science, tech, and coding, there's a lot [more inside]
posted by divabat on Aug 16, 2014 - 70 comments


Georgia Teens Develop App to Document Police Abuse - Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer. It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired. [more inside]
posted by Golden Eternity on Aug 15, 2014 - 26 comments

I Can Tell By The Pixels

Visualizing Algorithms shows you how computer algorithms can be represented visually, leading to better understanding of how the algorithms work:

"Have you ever implemented an algorithm based on formal description? It can be hard! Being able to see what your code is doing can boost productivity. Visualization does not supplant the need for tests, but tests are useful primarily for detecting failure and not explaining it. Visualization can also discover unexpected behavior in your implementation, even when the output looks correct."
posted by quiet earth on Jun 26, 2014 - 29 comments

The Count and his fucking LF

Coder's High. Metafilter's own David Auerbach, who says he's now a former programmer, describes a satori-like absorption that comes only from things like debugging.
posted by grobstein on Jun 18, 2014 - 73 comments


DevArt: An exhibition of art created with code - skywriting quadcopter drones programmed with c++, room dividers reimagined as 3D screens for psychedelic projections, using raspberry pi to rename WiFi networks as lines of poetry. They are collaborating with the Barbican in London for the Digital Revolution exhibition and are currently seeking an emerging creative coder to be funded to present at the exhibition alongside world-class interactive artists Zach Lieberman, Karsten Schmidt, and the duo of Varvara Guljajeva & Mar Canet.
posted by divabat on Feb 6, 2014 - 2 comments

"Are you sure you know how to do this?"

Silent Technical Privilege. "Even though I didn't grow up in a tech-savvy household and couldn't code my way out of a paper bag, I had one big thing going for me: I looked like I was good at programming."
posted by Memo on Jan 9, 2014 - 38 comments

Programming stories

For your Sunday reading, a couple of stories of ye olden computing days: Why MacPaint's Original Canvas was 416 Pixels Wide and A Great Old Timey Game Programming Hack.
posted by curious nu on Jan 5, 2014 - 29 comments

Auto-Didacts Will Rule the World

Everything you need to know about web development. Neatly packaged. "Beginners, start by clicking the html box and the next lessons you should learn will get highlighted." [via reddit]
posted by batmonkey on Sep 20, 2013 - 59 comments

A Woman’s Place

The year was 1986, and Lynda had just joined a small cadre of female engineers working for FI, a groundbreaking IT firm that laid the foundations for outsourced development and women’s rights in the workplace. The company, originally called Freelance Programmers, was founded in the early 1960s by Stephanie Shirley, a German who had been evacuated to Britain — along with many fellow Jewish children — as part of the kindertransport shortly before the Second World War.
Gender equality is still a major issue in the technology industry, but 50 years ago one British company was blazing trails.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jun 1, 2013 - 14 comments


10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10 (a collaborative book by Nick Montfort, Patsy Baudoin, John Bell, Ian Bogost (previously, previously, previously), Jeremy Douglass, Mark C. Marino, Michael Mateas (of Facade), Casey Reas, Mark Sample and Noah Vawter) uses a single line of code as a basis for pontificating on creative computing and the impact of software in popular culture. 10 PRINT's content is available as a PDF (50 MB). Pictures via Casey Reas' Flickr.
posted by mrgrimm on Nov 29, 2012 - 47 comments

Learnable Programming

Bret Victor: We often think of a programming environment or language in terms of its features -- this one "has code folding", that one "has type inference". This is like thinking about a book in terms of its words -- this book has a "fortuitous", that one has a "munificent". What matters is not individual words, but how the words together convey a message. Likewise, a well-designed programing system is not simply a bag of features. A good system is designed to encourage particular ways of thinking, with all features carefully and cohesively designed around that purpose.
posted by AceRock on Sep 27, 2012 - 69 comments

New Programming Jargon

This is just the top 30, what I consider to be the most likely candidates for actual new programming jargon based on community upvotes, not just "funny thing that another programmer typed on a webpage and I felt compelled to upvote for hilarity". Because that would be Reddit. Coding Horror presents the top 30 Stack Overflow New Programming Jargon entries.
posted by Artw on Jul 20, 2012 - 66 comments

Falsehoods Programmers Believe

Falsehoods programmers believe about names and time shows how difficult it can be to represent basic concepts in code.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jun 18, 2012 - 165 comments

Twitter Bootstrap For Beginners

Bootstrap is Twitter's toolkit for creating rich and more consistent web interfaces across browsers and devices. The Bootstrap ecosystem offers, among other things, an iconic font, themes, a customization generator, themes for Wordpress / Drupal + / Joomla, templates for Fireworks / Photoshop, a button generator and a jQuery UI theme. How to get started? Check out this tutorial or this series or even this. Built With Bootstrap has lots of examples on how developers are putting Bootstrap to good use.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jun 5, 2012 - 31 comments

Bad day for Oracle

Following a jury finding that Google had not infiringed upon Oracles patents, a development described as a near disaster for the database company, Judge William Aslup has ruled that the Java APIs cannot be copyrighted. That leaves Oracle with only the 9 lines of rangeCheck code and a handfull of decompiled test files to show for the massivecourt case. CEO Larry Ellison remains confident, claiming that the aquisition of Java creator Sun has still paid for itself.
posted by Artw on Jun 1, 2012 - 45 comments

Get off my lawn, programming n00bs!

Please don't learn to code (Coding Horror). Please Don't Become Anything, Especially Not A Programmer. (Learn Code the Hard Way).
posted by desjardins on May 15, 2012 - 123 comments

"Tweet-sized" JavaScript code

140byt.es JavaScript games and programs, all written in 140 bytes (characters) or less. Example games include Snake, Tetris (very basic), Minesweeper (again, very basic). Note that the license for most of these is NSFW.
posted by Deathalicious on Feb 15, 2012 - 10 comments

Code, misery, euphoria

“It’s misery, misery, misery, misery, euphoria.” (NYMag) Code kids break out of basement. Love the photos.
posted by maggieb on Sep 16, 2011 - 39 comments


Hacker Typer - Now you can look like you're doing something important on your computer, like you've always wanted to! (hit hack and just start bashing at your keyboard)
posted by azarbayejani on Apr 27, 2011 - 71 comments

The words are evolving as you read!

"We all can agree...that this text is red. We can also similarly agree that this text is blue." [more inside]
posted by zardoz on Feb 24, 2011 - 82 comments

if (ourChildren.learning == true)

Why Johnny can't code - David Brin asks how to get kids hooked on programming.
posted by Artw on Jun 22, 2010 - 112 comments

Programmers? Hackers? Journalists.

"The Journalist as Programmer" is an academic, ethnographic case study (pdf), which considers whether the New York Times' Interactive Newsroom Technologies unit, source of the paper's Open Source Developer Network, should be thought of as a template for the future of Web Journalism. Slide Deck. (Previously on MeFi.) NYMag profile of the INT team from '09: The New Journalism: Goosing the Gray Lady. ("What are these renegade cybergeeks doing at the New York Times? Maybe saving it.")
posted by zarq on May 24, 2010 - 5 comments

Oh, I thought it was Fox Force Five. Never mind.

The iPad, which you may have heard of, has brought HTML5 into the consciousness of many. Here Gizmodo explains what HTML5 is and why it wont save the internet. Previously.
posted by shothotbot on Feb 3, 2010 - 95 comments

Hey Jeff - Where's my "advertising your new site" badge.

Stack Overflow is now out of beta. Designed as a question and answer forum for programmers, it's been made to fill the gap currently filled by sites like the much hated and oft mispronounced Expertsexchange. If you're sick of having to scroll to the bottom, and you write code, then this could be for you. The site has been made by a team headed by Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky. These are two uber-bloggers who've made a name for themselves talking about how to code. Of course, for haters of Stack Overflow, there are already a couple of sites to pamper to your anger. Finally, if you're wondering what a stack overflow is, then wikipedia has the answer.
posted by seanyboy on Sep 15, 2008 - 51 comments

Damn his science is too tight!

The SEO Rapper (a.k.a. The Poetic Prophet) spits rhymes on such topics as Design Coding, Link Building, Paid Search, and Conversion Closing for all your marketing campaign and web design needs.
posted by dhammond on Mar 27, 2008 - 9 comments

Wheel me out

MATSYS Based on the idea that architecture can be understood as a material body with its own intrinsic and extrinsic forces relating to form, growth, and behavior, the studio investigates methodologies of performative integration through geometric and material differentiation.

B_Complex, N_Table, Endless Ocean, Endless Sky (more), P_Wall. more.
posted by klangklangston on Jan 18, 2008 - 6 comments

rendur 2.1 - HTML / CSS Rendering Site

rendur 2.1 - Dynamic HTML/CSS preview in your browser. A quick way to try out a bit of HTML and CSS code. Whatever you put in the box renders to its left. Now works in IE, though it's a bit better in Firefox (thanks to on-the-fly style sheet definitions). [via mefi projects]
posted by davebug on May 14, 2007 - 18 comments

The Commentator

Time commenting could be time coding. Day in, day out, you pull off star moves: gnarly algorithms, wicked refactorings, stunning optimizations. Why should you stop and explain? Yes, you've got plodders on your team, but hey — youAreAStar and yourTimeIsExpensive. Time spent explaining, documenting, commenting — dude! — that's time you could be using to crank out yet more mind-altering code. Welcome The Commentator.
posted by Lectrick on Aug 2, 2005 - 24 comments

Color Scheme

Color Scheme Adjust Hue, Brightness, Saturation, Scheme and considerations for Visual Anomalies.
posted by Feisty on Feb 29, 2004 - 11 comments

Gallery of neat Flash experiments--soon to include source code. I like this one, and the portrait of his dad is creepy. Also on the site, a gallery of free images.
posted by Fabulon7 on Nov 1, 2002 - 12 comments

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