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what if a 40-something secretary was secretly James Bond all along?

Ed Brubaker on Velvet (his new comic book series with Steve Epting): “I loved the idea of flipping the typical male-oriented spy story, and doing one about a woman who was also a mature, middle-aged woman.” [more inside]
posted by flex on Jul 15, 2014 - 31 comments

It's called Vindaloo.

Stickman's Tips for Having a Table at a Comic Book Convention is actually a pretty good primer for having a booth or table at any convention, ever. [more inside]
posted by Shepherd on May 29, 2014 - 23 comments

Do you ever feel, like, bad about working in a place like that?

Ducks is a five-part comic by Kate Beaton based on her time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray in 2008. It's 'about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans,' and it's sad and disturbing and shrewd all at once.
posted by EXISTENZ IS PAUSED on Apr 7, 2014 - 83 comments

Jeff Smith's newest comic, Tuki Saves the Humans, is free to read online

Jeff Smith, author of the highly lauded and much-awarded Bone comic series, and the subsequent RASL comic series, has returned with a new comic: Tüki Saves the Humans, a web series based on "the most current speculations of scientific experts" about a major ice age somewhere between 2 million and 975,000 years ago ancient Africa drying up, driving or allowing hominids to move from Africa. The first "season" of Tüki is now complete, which makes the Bones happy. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 3, 2014 - 26 comments

MRS. P.J. GILLIGAN

How a 1908 Anti-Suffrage Cartoon Became an Internet Sensation (poster, tumblr) [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 4, 2014 - 72 comments

It’s a Midwestern strip

From 1989, when Calvin & Hobbes was still pretty new, The Comics Journal's interview with Bill Watterson. The interviewer was Richard Samuel West.
posted by MartinWisse on Dec 6, 2013 - 18 comments

What makes a hero?

The Avenging Page (In Excelsis Ditko) is an exhaustive essay on the recent self-published comics of legendary artist and writer Steve Ditko.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Jul 24, 2013 - 23 comments

Not Lying

Saga, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples , has swept the Eisners, taking home awards for Best Continuing Series, Best New Series and Best Writer. Here's why you should be reading it.
posted by Artw on Jul 20, 2013 - 42 comments

Dear Mr. Watterson

Joel Schroeder, with the help of Kickstarter, has finally finished a documentary about Calvin and Hobbes and its creator, Bill Watterson. It's scheduled to be released on Nov. 15, 2013.
posted by reenum on Jul 16, 2013 - 36 comments

There’s nothing about Brian Wilson that isn’t tragic

Comic creators Matt Fraction (Casanova) and Mike Allred (Madman) make their ultimate summer playlist and discuss everything from Brian Wilson to robots.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Jul 15, 2013 - 11 comments

The jury's in... and they can't deny that view, either.

A month after its release, Naughty Dog's sweeping interactive epic The Last of Us is being hailed as one of the best games of all time, with perfect scores even from notoriously demanding critics. Inspired by an eerily beautiful segment from the BBC's Planet Earth, the game portrays an America twenty years after a pandemic of the zombiefying Cordyceps fungus (previously), leaving behind lush wastelands of elegant decay teeming with monsters and beset by vicious bandits, a brutal military, and the revolutionary Fireflies. Into this bleak vision of desperate violence journey Joel, a gruffly stoic Texan with a painful past, and his ward Ellie, a precocious teenager who may hold the key to mankind's future. Boasting tense, immersive gameplay, compelling performances from a diverse cast, a movingly minimalist score from Oscar-winning Gustavo Santaolalla, and an array of influences from Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men to Cormac McCarthy's The Road, it's already being slotted alongside BioShock Infinite and Half-Life 2 as one of modern gaming's crowning achievements. And while it's hard to disentangle plot from action, you don't have to buy a PS3 to experience it -- YouTube offers many filmic edits of the game, including this three-hour version of all relevant passages. And don't miss the 84-minute documentary exploring every facet of its production. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jul 14, 2013 - 81 comments

Battletechs and Battlemechs and Things That Go

Mechs done in the style of Richard Scarry by comics artist Evan Palmer.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Jun 17, 2013 - 12 comments

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Batman 1972 Coming Soon
posted by nooneyouknow on Jun 1, 2013 - 33 comments

"Makes you feel kind of desperate, doesn’t it?" *Mblgpf.*

"By the time Cathy began, the sexual revolution had ended, so the strip stands as a perfect artifact of a moment when the cultural understanding of coercion changed completely—a moment when, one could argue, second-wave feminism basically died. With its baby-boomer characters, Cathy dramatizes the aftermath: the ’60s ended when it became clear that a revolutionary movement toward a just society wasn’t happening; the ’70s ended up being about trying to navigate the wreckage of the ’60s. The ’80s were largely about looking for strategies to accept injustice and inequality, and to construe that acceptance itself as a positive value.

"Cathy takes its place in this cultural progression by drilling in the notion that it doesn’t matter what the law says: you are being coerced not by the state but by your desire to be valued."
posted by Rory Marinich on May 5, 2013 - 78 comments

Shazam

The world as you know it is a hologram of sound (SL comic strip on Warren Ellis's website but authored by Eric M. Esquivel, Scott Godlewski, Ryan Cody, and Henry Barajas)
posted by shivohum on Apr 24, 2013 - 7 comments

Ant Comics

Ant Comics. (nsfw for giant ant queen sex).
posted by rollick on Feb 27, 2013 - 33 comments

I'm not a kid, I'M A SHARK

Nimona is the shape-shifting, hell-raising sidekick to Ballister Blackheart, the biggest name in supervilliany. [more inside]
posted by mokin on Dec 27, 2012 - 25 comments

"There’s a lack of pretentiousness to the word ‘comic book’ that I think suits the medium itself very, very nicely."

The NYT Book Review just named it one of the 5 best fiction books of the year. The AV Club helpfully posted a video to show you what happens when you open it. Actually, lots of folks posted videos to show you what happens when you open it. Other folks raved in print about the author and his career. The Comics Journal asked a dozen critics of the author's work to send in reviews; this one focuses on the role of disability in the narrative. This one notes the book "is in a very primary sense a comic about women and the private lives they lead, and it investigates more fully than any other comic I have ever read the way they age, fall in love, explore their sexuality, come to terms with compromises they’ve had to make as they’ve grown, accept their limitations, confront squandered ability, have children (or choose not to have children), marry (or stay single), and make sense of the world around them." You might find Chris Ware's Building Stories worth a look or two. Or fourteen. [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Dec 19, 2012 - 28 comments

Alcohol yesterday, drugs today

"Based in Brisbane, Australia, Stuart uses the medium of comics to explore serious issues with a unique perspective and a sense of fun." - War on Drugs and more, and even more. [Previously]
posted by vidur on Oct 10, 2012 - 6 comments

Breaking Calvin

Breaking Bad dialogue via the jarring yet oddly fitting medium of Calvin & Hobbes strips. Clayton Hanson takes dialogue from Breaking Bad episodes and inserts them into Calvin & Hobbes strips. He's done all the seasons to date. In a recent interview with the Washington City Paper, he talked more about his inspiration, his process, and his lawyer. (Calvin & Hobbes & Copyright previously on the grey.)
posted by knile on Oct 1, 2012 - 43 comments

False Positive: a stew of short sci-fi and the macabre comics

False Positive is a a short story, webcomic anthology, which author and illustrator Mike Walton likes to call a stew, cooked from the gut, made with "a scoop of horror, a pinch of science-fiction, a dash of fantasy, and a bit of (To Be Determined)." Mike says the language could be rated PG-13, and the visuals feature a varying degrees of comic book violence and gore. There are 10 stand-alone "chapters" posted now, and new posts are made every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Mike also made a short trailer to further pique your interest. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 23, 2012 - 10 comments

Free Comics. What's not to love?

Free Comic Book Day is back again! (Previously.) It's the one day a year when comic book stores in North America and around the world will be handing out free books -- mainly as an attempt to lure new readers to the genre. Some shops do signings, too. See you at the comic book shops on May 5th!
posted by BlahLaLa on Apr 30, 2012 - 9 comments

Eulogy for a pretty swell guy

Young Edd Gould always enjoyed drawing comics of himself and his friends. Growing up in the internet age, his doodles evolved into Flash animations of increasing complexity, and in time Edd and pals Tom Ridgewell and Matt Hargreaves teamed up to produce an "Eddsworld" series of online webtoons and comics. At first crude and halting, the group's "eddisodes" progressed from surreal shorts and one-shots into full-fledged productions that pushed the boundaries of amateur web animation, with expressive characters, full soundtracks, complex effects, and a fast-paced, off-kilter sense of humor: MovieMakers - Spares - WTFuture - Rock Bottom - Hammer & Fail (2). At its height, the college co-op was producing shorts for Mitchell & Webb and the UN Climate Change Conference, fielding offers from Paramount and Cartoon Network, and racking up millions of hits on YouTube. Work slowed, however, when Gould was diagnosed with leukemia -- a relatively survivable form, though, and Gould carried on working gamely through his hospital stays. So it came as a shock last week when Matt and Tom announced that Edd had passed away, prompting an outpouring of grief and gratitude from all the fans he'd entertained and inspired in his short 23 years.
posted by Rhaomi on Apr 2, 2012 - 5 comments

Athena Wheatley, a webcomic

More diversity in sci-fi webcomix? Yes please: Athena Wheatley, or Warp & Weft features a black female scientist from the 19th century time-travelling to 9283. Fun, and looks good: Moebius meets Futurama meets Adventure Time (and sexy too! occasionaly cartoonishly NSFW)
posted by Tom-B on Mar 11, 2012 - 4 comments

hip-hop family tree comix

The Hip-Hop Family Tree: A Look Into the Viral Propagation of a Culture (part two, part three) is a "semi-regular, ongoing feature" currently running in the comic Brain Rot by Ed Piskor. (Ed Piskor and Wizzywig Comics previously on MeFi)
posted by flex on Jan 25, 2012 - 16 comments

Alan Moore's Masks: A Face to Face

Alan Moore and David Lloyd designed it 30 years ago. The V for Vendetta mask appropriated by Occupy protesters the world over. The Guardian recently asked Alan what he thought about the masks. Now Channel 4 news takes him into Occupy territory to face that face. But who is the true anarchist?
posted by 0bvious on Jan 13, 2012 - 37 comments

Journalism is just a gun. Aim it right, and you can blow a kneecap off the world.

In this time of corrupt politics, police brutality, media dereliction, and increasingly vicious culture wars, there's perhaps no graphic novel more relevant today than the brilliant and blackly funny Transmetropolitan. Created by Warren Ellis back in 1997 and inspired by prescient sci fi novel Bug Jack Barron, the series covers the work of gonzo journalist, vulgar misanthrope, and all-around magnificent bastard Spider Jerusalem in a sprawling futuristic vision of New York so chaotically advanced that humans splice genes with alien refugees, matter decompilers are as common as microwaves, and a new religion is invented every hour. As a callous Nixonian thug nicknamed The Beast prepares for his re-election to the presidency, a primary battle heats up between a virulent racist and a charismatic senator whose rictus grin masks some disturbing realities. When Jerusalem delves into the machinations of the race, he breaks into a web of conspiracies that threaten the future of the country -- a problem only he, his "filthy assistants," and the power of intrepid journalism can defeat. More: Read the first issue (or three) - browse images from the new artbook - Tor's read-along blog (another) - Jerusalem's touching report on cryogenic "Revivals" - dozens of original sketches and sample pages - timeline - quotes
posted by Rhaomi on Dec 17, 2011 - 55 comments

You have to get used to the Internet. It’s not the best place to play ball a lot of the time.

The AV Club interviews Kate Beaton, writer and artist of the webcomic Hark! A Vagrant.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on Oct 16, 2011 - 49 comments

Doctor Strange, the live-action movie(s)

Stephen Strange was an arrogant doctor, until a car accident damaged his hands, leading him try every cure possible. Eventually he made his way to the East, where the story progressed, and now he's Doctor Strange, master of magic! His thrilling tale is set to be the first Marvel superhero movie since Marvel was purchased by Disney. But there has been much history behind the latest movie, including a period when Guillermo del Toro was involved and wanted to include Neil Gaiman, a draft script by Alex Cox (1990, 5.1 mb PDF; review), and a draft script by Bob Gale (January 21, 1986, 3.5 mb PDF; review). Along with these incomplete attempts, there was the 1978 Dr. Strange TV movie, which you can watch online (full movie with Portuguese subtitles, or YT playlist). If you'd like another take, head to 1992 for the direct-to-video movie Doctor Mordrid. Depending on who you ask, it's a more or less entertaining/accurate take (warning: spoilers) on Dr Strange. Modrid is also online.
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 9, 2011 - 34 comments

I Love The Smell Of Web-Fluid In The Morning

What if Spider-Man served in Vietnam? A short comic by intricate artist James Stokoe, best known for his drippy fantasy comic Orc Stain. (Last two links may be NSFW)
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on Jun 7, 2011 - 28 comments

The Cartoon Guide to Life, the Universe, and Everything

Larry Gonick is a veteran American cartoonist best known for his delightful comic-book guides to science and history, many of which have previews online. Chief among them is his long-running Cartoon History of the Universe (later The Cartoon History of the Modern World), a sprawling multi-volume opus documenting everything from the Big Bang to the Bush administration. Published over the course of three decades, it takes a truly global view -- its time-traveling Professor thoroughly explores not only familiar topics like Rome and World War II but the oft-neglected stories of Asia and Africa, blending caricature and myth with careful scholarship (cited by fun illustrated bibliographies) and tackling even the most obscure events with intelligence and wit. This savvy satire carried over to Gonick's Zinn-by-way-of-Pogo chronicle The Cartoon History of the United States, along with a bevy of Cartoon Guides to other topics, including Genetics, Computer Science, Chemistry, Physics, Statistics, The Environment, and (yes!) Sex. Gonick has also maintained a few sideprojects, such as a webcomic look at Chinese invention, assorted math comics (previously), the Muse magazine mainstay Kokopelli & Co. (featuring the shenanigans of his "New Muses"), and more. See also these lengthy interview snippets, linked previously. Want more? Amazon links to the complete oeuvre inside! [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jun 6, 2011 - 29 comments

Oregon Noir

She Died In Terrebonne is a hard-boiled noir webcomic by Kevin Church. The Rack, The Loneliest Astronauts and his other comics can be found at Agreeable Comics.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on May 26, 2011 - 10 comments

Loving Free Comics Can Never Be Wrong

Free Comic Book Day is a single day - the first Saturday in May each year - when participating comic book shops across North America and around the world give away comic books absolutely free to anyone who comes into their stores. Here's the store locator.
posted by BlahLaLa on May 7, 2011 - 36 comments

a speculative essay on the self-regulating limits of reality

Mindless Ones is a surreal, cerebral comics blog filled with essays about Grant Morrison and Batman villains. Still not enough? Too Busy Thinking About My Comics takes comic book overthinking to another level.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on May 4, 2011 - 38 comments

The Sunset Perspective

The Airtight Garage (some images may be NSFW) is a blog that explores the artwork of Moebius (Jean Giraud), France's most acclaimed comic book artist. It is named after The Airtight Garage of Jerry Cornelius, a comic loosely based on Micheal Moorcock's protean hero. Moebius was recently the subject of an appreciation in Comics Alliance.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on Apr 27, 2011 - 49 comments

Punk rock and comic books! My two favorite things!

Mitch Clem, author of the late, lamented punk comic Nothing Nice To Say, is back with Turnstile Comics. The first issue is a collaboration with Jesse "Swan" Thorson from Minneapolis punks The Slow Death and includes a 4 song EP from them. It's printed in a 7 by 7-inch square to help fit with your record collection.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn on Mar 23, 2011 - 9 comments

Chris Ware Interview

An interview with Chris Ware from May 2010 at the international Copenhagen comics festival. Ware is the creator of Acme Novelty Library and Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. (via kottke) Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4
posted by BitterOldPunk on Mar 22, 2011 - 9 comments

I've Seen the Lizard Man.

reMIND is a webcomic that updates on Mondays.
posted by cthuljew on Jan 19, 2011 - 9 comments

Nothing is Forgotten

Nothing is Forgotten, a lovely little wordless comic about loss, fear, kindness, and memory.
posted by Gator on Jan 4, 2011 - 39 comments

iEye: Realize Your Dreams

Vision Machine by Greg Pak, a free comic about the not-so-distant future.
posted by cthuljew on Dec 17, 2010 - 6 comments

Cat Rackham, I choose you!

PORTRAIT-DEX! Cartoonists create Pokémon self-portraits, with all three evolved forms. Featuring, among other fine artists, Scott Kurtz (PVP), Box Brown (Everything Dies, Bellen!), Anthony Clark (Nedroid), Aaron Diaz (Dresden Codak), and Steve Wolfhard (Cat Rackham), who also runs the project.
posted by Gator on Oct 27, 2010 - 13 comments

They just want their comics back!

When the Tea Party takes over the comics page. - Comics reimagined by Ward Sutton for the Boston Globe [more inside]
posted by BeerFilter on Sep 26, 2010 - 58 comments

It's A Dog's Life

Caring about something is about taking the pain and the joy. The pain is hard. Taking the pain, facing it, dealing with it are the ways I think we can show we really care. That we know we care. --Bob, the story of a dog.
posted by Gator on Sep 18, 2010 - 16 comments

Digital Comics Museum

The Digital Comic Museum, a site for downloading free public domain Golden Age Comics. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Sep 8, 2010 - 17 comments

The rise of digital comics as viable medium

Ah, digital comics. Originally viewed with a wary eye by the American comics industry, the rise of mobile devices has started to turn a few publisher's heads. We may look back and see 2010 as the year digital comics reached the tipping point.
posted by nomadicink on Sep 2, 2010 - 69 comments

Monster Commute

Monster Commute: A webcomic about the hell that is driving to work in the cute Orwellian steampunk monster-infested mirror universe of Monstru. [more inside]
posted by Gator on Aug 14, 2010 - 2 comments

It's a good way to kill twenty minutes or so.

From 1979 to the end of the '80s, Sam Hurt produced a strange and wonderful little comic called Eyebeam. I'm very happy that the entire archives are up, as well as later additions. About the drab but sometimes very weird life of the eponymous character, the comic addressed a wide range of topics, including the decor of Chinese restaurants, wearing the wrong clothes to work, beach gidgets, job security, male answer syndrome, not-quite-vegetarianism and time travel. It managed to be pretty wise while still being funny. Just don't take it too literally.
posted by jiawen on Jun 18, 2010 - 20 comments

Cover Art From International Editions Of "Planet Of the Apes" Comics.

Get your hands off me, you damn, dirty macaco!
posted by grumblebee on Jun 15, 2010 - 6 comments

The Best Batman Comic Ever Made

The best Batman comic ever made. [more inside]
posted by battlebison on Jun 10, 2010 - 58 comments

It's Just a Stuffed Tiger

Calvin Minus Hobbes, via Comic Alliance. [more inside]
posted by jabberjaw on Jun 7, 2010 - 138 comments

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