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19 posts tagged with comics by filthy light thief.
Displaying 1 through 19 of 19.

Charmingly Antiquated comics, about love and loss, and other odd things

Charmingly Antiquated is a tumblr of the usual random sort, plus original art by Sam, which includes three one-shot short comics: a little love story about a mermaid and tattoos, a morbid little comic about a banshee, and a silly, silly little comic about a princess. If you like longer stories, you might enjoy Granted, which is also by Sam.
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 30, 2014 - 7 comments

The Green Turtle, the first Asian American super hero returns to comics

If you heard the recent NPR's Codeswitch segment on The Green Turtle, the first Asian superhero created in the United States, you heard descriptions of the 1940s comic. But there's more (so much more!) online. Start with the entire run of The Green Turtle on the amazing Digital Comic Museum, which hosts public domain Golden Age comics (late 1930s until the late 1940s or early 1950s). If you want to know more about Chu F. Hing, the artist behind the original Green Turtle, here's an extensively researched biography on the astounding Chinese American Eyes blog, which covers "famous, forgotten, well-known, and obscure visual artists of Chinese descent in the United States." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 16, 2014 - 6 comments

Jeff Smith's newest comic, Tuki Saves the Humans, is free to read online

Jeff Smith, author of the highly lauded and much-awarded Bone comic series, and the subsequent RASL comic series, has returned with a new comic: Tüki Saves the Humans, a web series based on "the most current speculations of scientific experts" about a major ice age somewhere between 2 million and 975,000 years ago ancient Africa drying up, driving or allowing hominids to move from Africa. The first "season" of Tüki is now complete, which makes the Bones happy. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 3, 2014 - 26 comments

Jim Henson's lost Tale of Sand, in graphic novel form by Ramon Perez

Let's think back to the 1960s, when more people were writing surreal, paranoid themes. Now place Jim Henson in that context, and you get Time Piece (YouTube, excerpt; behind the scenes clip, YT). Add in collaboration with writer (and puppeteer) Jerry Juhl and you have The Cube (YT, full film), as well as the setting for the hypnagogic story of a man pursued in the desert, called Tale of Sand. This was first written up as a screenplay and pitched as a movie in the late 1960s, then revised and re-pitched in 1974. But no one bit, so the screenplay was shelved, and then Jim gained fame for Sesame Street and The Muppets. Elements of Tale of Sand appeared in The Muppet Movie (YT, full movie) and other places since then, but the work was largely unseen and forgotten. Jump ahead three decades, and the Henson Company teams up with Archaia, first releasing Fraggle Rock and Dark Crystal comics, then digging in the Henson Company vault to bring Tale of Sand to light with cartoonist Ramón Pérez. You can see a preview of the graphic novel on Graphicly (including a nice dynamic display) and Amazon (static images, but more pages in the preview). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 6, 2013 - 8 comments

Eight years of Eisner Awards for Digital Comics

The Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, commonly shortened to the Eisner Awards, are prizes given for creative achievement in American comic books since 1988. The digital comic category was added in 2005. Some say the category could be expanded, given the abundance of digital creations. Regardless, there are 42 different titles nominated in the past 8 years. The 2013 nominations have been made: Ant Comic, by Michael DeForge (previously, twice) | Bandette, by Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover | It Will All Hurt, by Farel Dalrymple (previously) | Our Bloodstained Roof, by Ryan Andrews (previously) | Oyster War, by Ben Towle. Nominations and winners from prior years inside. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 21, 2013 - 31 comments

False Positive: a stew of short sci-fi and the macabre comics

False Positive is a a short story, webcomic anthology, which author and illustrator Mike Walton likes to call a stew, cooked from the gut, made with "a scoop of horror, a pinch of science-fiction, a dash of fantasy, and a bit of (To Be Determined)." Mike says the language could be rated PG-13, and the visuals feature a varying degrees of comic book violence and gore. There are 10 stand-alone "chapters" posted now, and new posts are made every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Mike also made a short trailer to further pique your interest. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 23, 2012 - 10 comments

Super cute super deformed super heros

Ridiculously cute comic book fan art by Turkish artist Riza Turker. If that's too saccharine, browse his comicbook fanart for other looks beyond the cutesy "super deformed" style.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 1, 2012 - 4 comments

"I would soon learn that the laughter of the Son of God was no ordinary thing."

Christmas is a time for traditions. For some, it's all about stringing up lights on a Christmas tree and wrapping up presents to put beneath it. For others, it's spending singing carols door to door to spread holiday cheer. And for still others, it's a time to beat a log with a stick until it poops out candy. If you're not familiar with that last one, don't worry: ComicsAlliance favorites Benito Cereno and Anthony Clark have stepped up to explain it all in an original comic featuring an Untold Tale of St. Nicholas! [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 24, 2011 - 4 comments

Henry + Glenn = 4ever

Four friends who collectively call themselves Igloo Tornado wrote a series of fictional tales of the love between Henry Rollins and Glenn Danzig, plus some jokes from their Satan worshiping neighbors, Daryl Hall and John Oates. This land of make-believe is contained in Glenn & Henry Forever. There isn't a preview in one handy location, but various interviews, reviews, and blogs have posted some of the comics (more: Henry has no shoes, Hall & Oats play D&D, a postcard from Henry to Glenn, and a page from Danzig's diary). Danzig, often the butt of internet jokes, was not thrilled. His thoughts were made into a final comic. Oh, and there's an anti-Christmas animation special/advert. And a gallery show with more artists joining the fun.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 3, 2011 - 18 comments

Doctor Strange, the live-action movie(s)

Stephen Strange was an arrogant doctor, until a car accident damaged his hands, leading him try every cure possible. Eventually he made his way to the East, where the story progressed, and now he's Doctor Strange, master of magic! His thrilling tale is set to be the first Marvel superhero movie since Marvel was purchased by Disney. But there has been much history behind the latest movie, including a period when Guillermo del Toro was involved and wanted to include Neil Gaiman, a draft script by Alex Cox (1990, 5.1 mb PDF; review), and a draft script by Bob Gale (January 21, 1986, 3.5 mb PDF; review). Along with these incomplete attempts, there was the 1978 Dr. Strange TV movie, which you can watch online (full movie with Portuguese subtitles, or YT playlist). If you'd like another take, head to 1992 for the direct-to-video movie Doctor Mordrid. Depending on who you ask, it's a more or less entertaining/accurate take (warning: spoilers) on Dr Strange. Modrid is also online.
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 9, 2011 - 34 comments

Illustrated recipes

Do you find yourself envious of the perfectly staged photos accompanying recipes? Are your drawing skills better than your culinary skills? Recipe Look is a collection of user-submitted illustrated recipes, some with pictures fit for a magazine, others a bit more casual. See also: Drawn Butter, an illustrated recipe blog (via Johnny Wander's Ecto-Cooler Smoothie); Pictoral Recipes from Oregon State University (in English and Spanish); and two recipes from comic artist Lucy Knisley (via; Knisley prev, prev).
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 1, 2011 - 5 comments

"I suppose it looks strange to you to see Superman speaking Arabic"

"Until about 1964 most comic books in the Middle East were in either English or French.... Then a forward-looking editor began to wonder why comic books could not be translated into Arabic." Illustrated Publications, a Beirut-based company, did just that, starting with Superman. As a reporter for "Al-Kawkab Al Yawmi" he swooped into the Middle east from distant Krypton on February 4, 1964. The mild-mannered report, Clark Kent, became Nabil Fawzi, whose name roughly translated to "Noble Victory". The text of the comics was translated, but the rest of the comic looked an awful lot like the Superman of the United States, except the covers lacked context, Superman's S logo was reversed, and some of the colors were skewed in odd ways. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 31, 2011 - 5 comments

I smell expensive perfume... I'm standing on some sort of fur rug. There's music... I must be in the Playboy Mansion!

Stan Lee has not yet been told about ... GRIT! FEATURING -- Dourdevil, the man without a sense of humor (different presentations of the same comic). The year was 1983, and Alan Moore was spoofing the style of Frank Miller (bibliography), towards the end of Frank Miller's run with Daredevil. Moore thought highly of Miller, if one believes what Moore wrote in "The Importance of Being Frank" (linked therein as a .cbz file), which was published in the same comics magazine run as Grit! [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 21, 2010 - 53 comments

El Santo: I only do what I can, to wipe out injustice and crime

The history of lucha libre in Mexico is hard to pin down, some citing the French invasion of 1863 as a origin of modern wrestling in Mexico, with two Italian business men making it commercial in the 1930s, while others take it back to the ancient Mayan and Aztec cultures and credit the modern rebirth with a retired revolutionary army colonel from the United States. But no matter who gets credit as the father of the Mexican sport, El Santo was it's hero for decades, in the ring, in comics, in the movies, and in life. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 28, 2010 - 21 comments

Send Me (X) and I'll Make You (Y)

User-submitted inspiration for comics and art: Poorly-drawn cartoons inspired by actual spam subject lines (prev), and more refined comics from "normal" text spam text. Cartoons drawn from titles sent to one Sam Brown (pseudonym of Adam Culbert). Artists send artwork, someone else adds the text. Submit a video game title and description and get the box art made for you, courtesy of MeFi's own cheap paper [via mefi projects].
posted by filthy light thief on May 26, 2010 - 21 comments

Conan is Cimmerian, he cannot cry. I cry for him: Frank Frazetta - 1928 to 2010

Frank Frazetta, was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1928. He rose to fame first for his work with comic books in the 1940s and 50s, then for his iconic fantasy art from the 1960s on. Frazetta was the inspiration behind Zelda artist Yusuke Nakano, and Frazetta's artwork for the "Famous Funnies" were an inspiration for Star Wars. Frank Frazetta died today, at the age of 82. More history, eulogies and links inside. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 10, 2010 - 85 comments

The First Detective of the Space Age, and more Pulp Science Fiction Art

Ron Turner (1922 to December 1998) was an artist and author from the UK, with a extensive list of credits. He script, letter and created the artwork for a number of series, though that proved to be too much for the quick turn-around time required for publishing. He excelled when he could focus on the artwork, as seen with Rick Random, who first appeared as part of Super Detective Library in the 1950s. "The first detective of the space age" returned in the late 70s with 2000 AD. Ten story arcs from the 1950s and 60s were collected in quite a tome, featuring new cover art. Though Turner was well known for his pulp Sci-Fi artwork that graced comic and book covers, he only produced two covers for Super Detective Library, and neither were suitable for a Rick Random compendium.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 19, 2010 - 4 comments

Charting Imaginary Worlds

Comic Book Cartography is more than maps of make-believe lands. It also covers cutaways ga-lore, robot schematics, and diagrams of Batman's utility belt. In the same vein, there was The Marvel Atlas Project (M.A.P.), and though it is now offline, some pictures have survived. There is also the two-part Marvel Atlas, a subset of the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe. The Atlast of the DC Universe is limited to Earth, (sourced from the DC Heros RPG book and Secret Files & Origins Guide to the DC Universe 2000), and Mapping Gotham is a single blog post which collects some maps from Batman's world, as found from a variety of sources. The Map Room collected a few more, some which require some digging into the archives. [more, previously]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 15, 2010 - 28 comments

The Maxx: An Excuse to Draw a Circle and a Triangle and Add Some Arms

Sam Kieth is an interesting guy, coming from an artistic family (including a cousin who created the animated series Cow and Chicken). His professional work has mostly been in the world of comics, though he did direct a movie for Roger Corman, entitled "Take it to the Limit" (2000), as a way "to recharge [his] batteries after the Maxx." The Maxx was a 35 issue comic (plus a few bonuses), and later animated and aired on Mtv's Oddities in the mid 1990s. (More videos inside) [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 21, 2009 - 31 comments

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