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Focus On the Logo to Boot (First Time?)

Dreamspace is an animated cyberpunk comic-presented-as-visual-novel/adventure-game by artist Cryoclaire (potentially NSFW; artistic nudity) about networked psychedelics, consciousness expansion through underground social networks and gorgeous trippy neon GUIs. Like most cyberpunk fiction, the characters are all sunny, cheerful personalities, everyone has a good time and absolutely no one winds up crippled, dead or insane by the end.
posted by byanyothername on Sep 17, 2013 - 14 comments

"the greatest unlauded daily strip of the post war age"

Fawkes always noted that “the cartoonists know me as the one who plays the clarinet. The jazz people say I’m the one who does the cartoons.” -- TCJ's Adam Smith interviews British cartoonist & jazz musician Wally Fawkes, who played with the likes of Sidney Bechet and Humphrey "ISIHAC" Lyttelton. He gave up jazz for cartoons and for forty years was the artist on the classic UK newspaper comic Flook, which featured writing by a host of well known names like George Melly, Barry Took, Compton Mackenzie, Barry Norman and Humphrey Lyttelton again.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 13, 2013 - 4 comments

The Phantom Zone

"In comic books, as in the moving image, the frame is the constituent element of narrative. Each page of a comic book is a frame which itself frames a series of frames, so that by altering each panel's size, bleed or aesthetic variety, time and space can be made elastic. Weisinger and Boring's Phantom Zone took this mechanism further, behaving like a weaponized frame free to roam within the comic book world. Rather than manipulating three-dimensional space or the fourth dimension of time, as the comic book frame does, The Phantom Zone opened out onto the existence of other dimensions. It was a comic book device that bled beyond the edge of the page, out into a world in which comic book narratives were experienced not in isolation, but in parallel with the onscreen narratives of the cinema and the television. As such, the device heralded televisual modes of attention." - Daniel Rourke on Superman's Phantom Zone (well, kinda...)
posted by artof.mulata on Sep 11, 2013 - 10 comments

It's a house blend

Darkseid is impressed by Thanos’s coffee.
posted by bswinburn on Sep 7, 2013 - 46 comments

JH Williams III and Haden Blackman walk off Batwoman

In a letter crossposted to both Haden Blackman's and JH William III's website, they announced they are planning to leave Batwoman due to a number of 'eleventh hour changes', including a refusal to have Kate Kane marry her fiancee, Maggie Sawyer. [more inside]
posted by dinty_moore on Sep 5, 2013 - 51 comments

Bring me the head of Boba Fett!

In 2002 the Eltingville comic-book-science-fiction-fantasy-horror and role playing club made the leap from the pages of Evan Dorkin's Dork comic into an animated pilot for Cartoon Network's Adult Swim, as Welcome to Eltingville. Sadly the series wasn't picked up, but the pilot is available on Youtube: part 1, part 2, part 3 (bonus title music by the Aquabats. Sadly so far the Northwest Comix Collective hasn't made the same leap.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 4, 2013 - 21 comments

Heroes and Villains

Comics Alliance's Andy Khouri and Betty Felon (curator of Best Cosplay Ever) review SyFy's Heroes of Cosplay and talk about narratives of reality TV, Yaya Han and credit and authenticity in cosplay.
posted by Artw on Aug 31, 2013 - 22 comments

The Only Woman Caricaturist

"Mary Williams adopted the name “Kate Carew” and wrote candid, witty interviews with luminaries of the day, including Mark Twain, Pablo Picasso, and the Wright Brothers. She adorned her interviews with her unique “Carewatures,” and often drew herself into the scene. Imagine Oprah Winfrey as a liberated woman caricaturist-interviewer in 1900 and you have an idea of who Kate Carew was. -- The Comics Journal's Paul Tumey rediscovers a cartooning pioneer in the course of a review of a new book about early US comics. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 31, 2013 - 4 comments

How to draw comics the Charlton way

Hey kid! Are you a budding young talent anxious to present your work to the world, but not quite sure how the professionals draw comics? Well, the wise guys at Charlton are ready to help you with their 1973 comic book guide for the artist-writer-letterer.
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 30, 2013 - 21 comments

"Kitchee-koo, you bastards!"

70 years ago today in Philadelphia, PA, a weirdo was born. He grew up in a spectacularly dysfunctional family, angry, alienated and beset by bizarre sexual compulsions, mostly involving girls with giant butts. But following those early years of bitter struggle, he became a celebrated cartoonist, musician and misanthrope whose controversial, hilarious (and just as often despairing) art transformed funnybooks and American society. His name is R. Crumb. [more inside]
posted by Ursula Hitler on Aug 30, 2013 - 45 comments

"The Hero who Created a Thousand Heroes."

"The reason I picked the over-used cliché “behind the lines” for this series is probably going to be pretty obvious. Each month I’m going to take a look at Jack Kirby original pencils and examples of Kirby original art — images that reveal information not in the final newsprint publications. I may also take a look at some scans of Jack’s pencils from the 70s and compare those to the printed books. Mainly I want to focus on Jack’s famous margin notes from his 1960s work so we can get a glimpse into the Jack Kirby/Stan Lee collaboration." -- On what should've been Jack Kirby's 96th birthday, Robert Steibel starts a new column at tcj.com looking at the King's artwork. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 28, 2013 - 16 comments

We're all waiting for the other kids' moms to throw theirs out first

"We talked about how it’s crazy that there is this generation of comics collectors that basically all have the same collection. Exactly the same. Like the one we just saw. And how it’s (basically) worthless. And how those collections were worth real money even ten years ago. Maybe more like 20 years ago. Remember G.I. Joe #2 from 1982? It used to be worth 40 bucks. Now, just a click away, there are 6 used from various sellers starting at 99 cents. Spahr joked that we should have all sold when the market was at its peak in the early ’90s." -- Bad news for those of us who wanted to fund our kids' college funds with our comics collection: even rare comics are worthless now.
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 23, 2013 - 128 comments

hey baby, listen to this!

cats against catcalling inspired a mixtape. (won't someone make a song for these ponies?)
posted by dizziest on Aug 21, 2013 - 8 comments

From a distance it looks a bit like...

A history of CLiNT, Mark Millar’s attempt at launching a newsstand anthology comic, which ended this month despite its Lad Mag sensibility, celebrity creators such as Jonathan Ross and Frankie Boyle, and a recent reboot. The comic magazine joins the likes of Revolver, Deadline, Crisis, Toxic! and Meltdown in the great newsagents in the sky, though like many of those other short lived UK magazines it has spawned many spin off successes, not least the controversial Kick Ass II, which is now a movie minus its rape scene.
posted by Artw on Aug 21, 2013 - 62 comments

"Where are you from?" "Chicago." "Chicago? Go Blackhawks!"

Webcomics artist Sarah Becan and her partner traveled to Montreal in June. She illustrated the culinary highlights of their trip for Saveur magazine.
posted by Kitteh on Aug 20, 2013 - 46 comments

Drawing Inspiration

A look inside the cartoonist's sketchbook - Anders Nilsen, Jeffrey Brown, Kate Beaton, Rutu Modan, Chris Ware
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 17, 2013 - 6 comments

You know what Jack Burton says at a time like this?

Comic artist Chris Weston unilaterally declares it Kurt Russell week and produces a triptych of posters for Escape from New York, The Thing and Big Trouble in little China. These are just the roughs.
posted by Artw on Aug 13, 2013 - 61 comments

Mad Men And Bad Men

What Batman can learn from Mad Men and The Sopranos
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Aug 11, 2013 - 33 comments

Kevin gets a Kiss

Archie Comics Gets Its First Gay Kiss, Takes On One Million Moms. A couple years back, Archie Comics introduced its first gay character, Kevin Keller. (previously) Since, he's become a normal fixture in Riverdale, and even gotten married in an alternate universe. But finally, Kevin gets an on-panel kiss for the first time -- in his own universe, even! The issue includes a riff on everyone's poorly-counting scolds One Million Moms. [more inside]
posted by Rev. Syung Myung Me on Aug 10, 2013 - 40 comments

Avengers Sex Toys

The Avengers - 6 Pieces Of Pleasure. NSFW: Black Widow & Hawkeye Aren’t Left Out Of This Fake Avengers Sex Toy Line.
posted by homunculus on Aug 10, 2013 - 70 comments

"You are NOT alone"

"Depression comix are simply a graphical representation of how depression and other related illnesses feel from a personal perspective." (about)
posted by Memo on Aug 10, 2013 - 22 comments

The Hound of Steel

Superman's dog: A history.
posted by Artw on Aug 8, 2013 - 41 comments

an overly-rendered red boot stamping on the reader's disinterested face

"With two years' hindsight, it is more and more apparent that the true shift signified by the advent of the Nu52 was that individual characters no longer matter (to say nothing of creators). The most important brand is not Superman or Batman or Green Lantern and certainly not Shazam or John Constantine, but DC Comics - oops, sorry, DC Entertainment. The most important thing for them is that they have a cohesive universe that can be presented as a legible whole. The great triumphs of superhero comics have traditionally come as a result of the genre's strange, disreputable, tatterdemalion profligacy. But it's becoming harder and harder for companies to justify extending that kind of creative freedom in regards to characters who might each and every one of them (in the minds of Warner Brothers executives) end up as their next billion-dollar franchise. The cruel irony is that without being able to offer that kind of freedom and trust to individual creators, the stories become sterile and vapid, and the IP is degraded. Marvel for the time being have managed to figure out how to walk the tightrope between control and liberty, enough so that a not-insignificant percentage of their line is actually very good, and many more books are pleasantly readable. There just aren't that many DC books I'd stop to pick up for free off the street. " -- Tim O'Neil reviews DC Comics' latest crossover, original sin and why the NuDC is so anemic.
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 7, 2013 - 63 comments

Simon and the rat both feel it's best to just ignore each other

"The very first single-player dungeoncrawl game was not a video game. It was a series of charts printed in the first edition of Dungeons & Dragons, back in 1979. By rolling dice according to the instructions, you could generate a dungeon which was illogical, arbitrary, super-lethal, and which often didn't even produce useable results.
THIS GAME USES THOSE CHARTS."

Dungeon Robber is a flash text game that simulates playing AD&D by the AD&D Appendix A dungeon generation rules. You'll probably die a lot, but the game saves every time you head to town. Blog of the creator.
Dungeon Robber comics![more inside]
posted by JHarris on Aug 6, 2013 - 127 comments

Now that I'm indestructible all I can worry about is sex

Wolverine: A Film By Woody Allen
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Aug 5, 2013 - 37 comments

To me, my X-Men!

The 50 greatest X-Men stories of all time, as picked by CBR readers. Direct links to the Top 10: 10-7, 6-4, 3-1. Fans of number 2 on the list may be excited to see what Trask Industries is up to. Bonus Link: Chris Claremont critiques The Wolverine.
posted by Artw on Aug 1, 2013 - 89 comments

"I have no reason to expect compensation"

How DC Contracts Work. Mark Waid, author of Superman: Birthright (drawn on heavily for the recent film Man of Steel), "explains how professionals are generally compensated for working on company-owned characters".
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Jul 25, 2013 - 46 comments

What makes a hero?

The Avenging Page (In Excelsis Ditko) is an exhaustive essay on the recent self-published comics of legendary artist and writer Steve Ditko.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Jul 24, 2013 - 23 comments

Not Lying

Saga, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples , has swept the Eisners, taking home awards for Best Continuing Series, Best New Series and Best Writer. Here's why you should be reading it.
posted by Artw on Jul 20, 2013 - 42 comments

Dear Mr. Watterson

Joel Schroeder, with the help of Kickstarter, has finally finished a documentary about Calvin and Hobbes and its creator, Bill Watterson. It's scheduled to be released on Nov. 15, 2013.
posted by reenum on Jul 16, 2013 - 36 comments

Ah! They DO have a name!

Quimps, Plewds, And Grawlixes: The Secret Language Of Comic Strips [more inside]
posted by Tevin on Jul 16, 2013 - 10 comments

There’s nothing about Brian Wilson that isn’t tragic

Comic creators Matt Fraction (Casanova) and Mike Allred (Madman) make their ultimate summer playlist and discuss everything from Brian Wilson to robots.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Jul 15, 2013 - 11 comments

World's Finest

DC has uploaded tons of DC Nation animated shorts to YouTube Including My Little Pony creator Lauren Faust's Super Best Friends Forever (previously). Not yet included: Robert Valley's super awesome 70s Wonder Woman.
posted by Artw on Jul 15, 2013 - 24 comments

The jury's in... and they can't deny that view, either.

A month after its release, Naughty Dog's sweeping interactive epic The Last of Us is being hailed as one of the best games of all time, with perfect scores even from notoriously demanding critics. Inspired by an eerily beautiful segment from the BBC's Planet Earth, the game portrays an America twenty years after a pandemic of the zombiefying Cordyceps fungus (previously), leaving behind lush wastelands of elegant decay teeming with monsters and beset by vicious bandits, a brutal military, and the revolutionary Fireflies. Into this bleak vision of desperate violence journey Joel, a gruffly stoic Texan with a painful past, and his ward Ellie, a precocious teenager who may hold the key to mankind's future. Boasting tense, immersive gameplay, compelling performances from a diverse cast, a movingly minimalist score from Oscar-winning Gustavo Santaolalla, and an array of influences from Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men to Cormac McCarthy's The Road, it's already being slotted alongside BioShock Infinite and Half-Life 2 as one of modern gaming's crowning achievements. And while it's hard to disentangle plot from action, you don't have to buy a PS3 to experience it -- YouTube offers many filmic edits of the game, including this three-hour version of all relevant passages. And don't miss the 84-minute documentary exploring every facet of its production. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jul 14, 2013 - 81 comments

Jim Henson's lost Tale of Sand, in graphic novel form by Ramon Perez

Let's think back to the 1960s, when more people were writing surreal, paranoid themes. Now place Jim Henson in that context, and you get Time Piece (YouTube, excerpt; behind the scenes clip, YT). Add in collaboration with writer (and puppeteer) Jerry Juhl and you have The Cube (YT, full film), as well as the setting for the hypnagogic story of a man pursued in the desert, called Tale of Sand. This was first written up as a screenplay and pitched as a movie in the late 1960s, then revised and re-pitched in 1974. But no one bit, so the screenplay was shelved, and then Jim gained fame for Sesame Street and The Muppets. Elements of Tale of Sand appeared in The Muppet Movie (YT, full movie) and other places since then, but the work was largely unseen and forgotten. Jump ahead three decades, and the Henson Company teams up with Archaia, first releasing Fraggle Rock and Dark Crystal comics, then digging in the Henson Company vault to bring Tale of Sand to light with cartoonist Ramón Pérez. You can see a preview of the graphic novel on Graphicly (including a nice dynamic display) and Amazon (static images, but more pages in the preview). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 6, 2013 - 8 comments

STERANKO

Jim Steranko is on Twitter. It is awesome
posted by Artw on Jul 5, 2013 - 28 comments

Cor, a slap up feed of comics links!

In the wake of the rumoured demise of The Dandy, artist Jamie Smart writes about the necessity of All-ages comics and how to make them work. Bonus links: The origins of new British weekly kids comic, The Phoenix. Al Ewing on that most British weekly comicsy of institutions: The readers voice. Tips for aspiring comics creators.
posted by Artw on Jul 4, 2013 - 18 comments

All the world is waiting for you, and the power you possess...

The Problem with Wonder Woman - An iconic DC superhero on the level of Batman and Superman, her potential remains competitively untapped. Can Grant Morrison And Yanick Paquette’s Wonder Woman: Earth One Help? Or is Perez’ Wonder Woman the Gold standard?
posted by Artw on Jun 28, 2013 - 191 comments

THE END IS EXTREMELY FUCKING NIGH

It's debatable whether the troubled World War Z signals the end of the ongoing zombie craze, but the film that started it all is much more clear: Danny Boyle's bleak, artful cult horror-drama 28 Days Later, which saw its US premiere ten years ago this weekend. From its iconic opening shots of an eerily abandoned London (set to Godspeed You! Black Emperor's brooding post-rock epic "East Hastings") to the frenzied chaos of its climax, Boyle's film -- a dark yet humanist tale of a world eviscerated by a frighteningly contagious epidemic of murderous rage -- reinvented and reinvigorated the genre that Romero built (though many insist its rabid, sprinting berserkers don't really count). And while sequel 28 Weeks Later with its heavyhanded Iraq War allusions failed to live up to the original (despite boasting one of the most viscerally terrifying opening sequences in modern horror), and 28 Months looks increasingly unlikely, there remains a small universe of side content from the film, including music, short films, comics, and inspired-by games. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jun 28, 2013 - 90 comments

Like the cuckoo clock, comics no longer a Swiss invention

So the Scots pride themselves on basically invented everything that makes modern life worth living and now they can add comics to their list. William Heath's The Glasgow Looking Glass was first published in 1825, twelve years before Rudolphe Töpffer's Histoire de M. Vieux Bois.
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 28, 2013 - 18 comments

LOLympus

Olympus Overdrive is a webcomic in which the gods of Greek mythology compete to replace Zeus as the ruler of Olympus. Each deity is rebooted into the modern world and bound to a mortal companion, and together they must try to defeat the other teams. The winner immortal gets Zeus's Thunderbolt, while the winner mortal gets anything they desire. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Jun 26, 2013 - 20 comments

Cartozia Tales

CARTOZIA IS A WORLD OF MANY STORIES Each issue of Cartozia Tales will feature stories by nine indy cartoonists. Each of us will be bringing his or her separate ideas, imagination, and drawing style to the world that we're sharing. Every issue will be full of surprises, and no one knows where the stories will wind up. [more inside]
posted by jillithd on Jun 21, 2013 - 3 comments

No more issues

Kim Thompson, of Fantagraphic and Comics Journal, dead at 57
posted by klangklangston on Jun 19, 2013 - 41 comments

But will the beliebers like it?

Back in the early nineties Harvey Comics published a series of licensed New Kids on the Block comics. Sadly for Justin Bieber, Harvey Comics no longer exists, so instead he has to make do with the very unlicensed and very nsfw Sean T. Collins/Michael Hawkins created Biebercomic.
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 18, 2013 - 9 comments

Hamstuck

Inappropriate Time For Ham
3 Cheers for Steak!
A Steep Price For Pie

Three tasteless comics by Andrew Hussie about various kinds of comestibles. Also: Humanimals [possibly NSFL]
posted by Rory Marinich on Jun 18, 2013 - 14 comments

Battletechs and Battlemechs and Things That Go

Mechs done in the style of Richard Scarry by comics artist Evan Palmer.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Jun 17, 2013 - 12 comments

Haunted by the Future

Enki Bilal: Haunted by the Future -Paul Gravett on the Yugoslavian/French comics superstar.
posted by Artw on Jun 16, 2013 - 9 comments

"He’s also on PCP, FYI."

The Open Key: comics inspired by the endless stream of weirdness that is the Chicago Police and Fire scanner. (And if you prefer your scanner feed with evocative ambient music, You Are Listening to ___ has a new site.)
posted by theodolite on Jun 14, 2013 - 2 comments

Marvel Annouces Orginal Graphic Novels, Skin Care Tie-In

While some of Marvel's superheroes are busy fighting the forces of dry, aging skin, Publisher's Weekly wonders if Marvel's decision to release original graphic novels (OGN) after years of refusal is a game changer for the industry.
posted by The Whelk on Jun 13, 2013 - 75 comments

The Mouse from Uncl^h^hcanny valley

In 1966, with America in the grip of spy fever, some bright spark at Dell/Gold Keythought it would be a good idea to have the long running Mickey Mouse comic join the bandwagon. This didn't mean just getting Mickey to dress up as James Bond. It was much more bizarre than that. For three issues Mickey was running around in a human world, thwarting the plans of assorted evil villains, rescuing beautiful female agents, do all the things any other self respecting super spy would do, just as a cartoon mouse. The way they went about it was to have regular Mickey Mouse cartoonist Paul Murry draw Mickey and Goofy in his normal funny animal style, while Dan Spiegle, a much more realistic artist, drew the rest of the strip. The results were striking.
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 7, 2013 - 16 comments

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