62 posts tagged with composer. (View popular tags)
Displaying 51 through 62 of 62. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (47)
+ (16)
+ (12)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (6)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)
+ (4)


Users that often use this tag:
Trurl (8)
Joe Beese (7)
flapjax at midnite (5)
1f2frfbf (3)
Egg Shen (2)
Rory Marinich (2)
wcfields (2)

Karlheinz Stockhausen Dead at 79

RIP Karlheinz Stockhausen, 1928-2007.
posted by teletype1 on Dec 7, 2007 - 51 comments

 

It's the oboes that really brought life to the performance, don't you think?

John Cage's 4'33" has been discussed previously on MeFi, but you might've missed the full orchestral version. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Sep 22, 2007 - 126 comments

Hermeto Pascoal's Música da Lagoa

You folks out there in MeFi Town been keeping up with the water themed MeFi Music Challenge? There's been some mighty fine uploads for you to check out! But if there was ever a piece of music deserving the water tag, it's this drenching wet masterpiece by Brazil's brilliant, eccentric musical genius Hermeto Pascual, in which Hermeto and his band play bottles full of water, and flutes full of water, and, well, the lake. Música da Lagoa: water music at its very best. And its very wettest. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 6, 2007 - 8 comments

ZAPPA! Do you speak it?

Frank Zappa - The Gigantic Spoken Word Project. Numerous volumes of a very large collection of Frank Zappa spoken word releases. They consist of radio interviews and journalist reporter type personal interviews. During the radio interviews sometimes music was played as background or added before the broadcast in between questions and answers. Sometimes FZ acts as D.J., plays records from his collection and talks to the radio audience. But the main focus of this series is FZ interviews which to me is as interesting as his music. (Just a quick warning; the download mechanism is a tad annoying)
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Jul 5, 2007 - 6 comments

The music of things.

If you've ever thought that music can be an extremely intuitive and effective way to communicate things, then Stanford Professor Jonathan Berger (samples of his music) is doing some research that might interest you. (via)
posted by wander on Feb 6, 2007 - 8 comments

A melody is silenced

Gian Carlo Menotti was, until his death at 95, the most often-performed contemporary opera composer. Among his works is the first opera composed for radio, the most popular Christmas opera, possibly the first opera in which a telephone plays a principal role (Poulenc's came more than a decade later), an opera about aliens, and a masterpiece about life under totalitarian rule (which was also the first time that suicide by gas oven made it to the stage). He ignored the fashion of atonality that held academia in thrall, and never veered from his lyrical style. He wrote his own libretti, which showed a mastery and love of language as deep as his musical talents. Some of his works were Broadway successes. And he created one of the finest music festivals [includes embedded music video]. He will be remembered.
posted by QuietDesperation on Feb 2, 2007 - 4 comments

Tod Dockstader

Tod Dockstader.
posted by hama7 on Feb 2, 2007 - 22 comments

Moving an 100 year old church - via the power of rock

Moving an 100 year old church - via the power of rock (YouTube page) Watching a show about buildings being moved by truck, my attention drifted towards the captivating music, from composer Daniel Pemberton. One of the gems on his MySpace page is this clip in which a 40-strong choir leads an 100-year old church as it is moved down a road, to a soundtrack akin to the Beatles or Polyphonic Spree. It's bizarre and certainly not your normal documentary fare.
posted by skylar on Jan 30, 2007 - 14 comments

Good for Goodie

However interesting your life is, it probably pales in comparison to Moondog. A homeless, blind composer who transcribed in braille, he went from a career as a street corner musician in New York, to sitting in Carnegie Hall for rehersals at the invitation of Artur Rodzinski, he was invited to Germany and wrote a symphony for four conductors: "The Overtone Tree", he was covered by Janis Joplin and worked with Julie Andrews. (mi)
posted by 1f2frfbf on Aug 29, 2006 - 13 comments

A . for Ligeti

RIP. Composer Gyorgy Ligeti dies in Vienna at age 83.
posted by NemesisVex on Jun 12, 2006 - 28 comments

Tocatta and Fudged in D Minor

Did Bach compose Tocatta and Fugue in D minor?
posted by daksya on Nov 1, 2005 - 66 comments

Was Richard Rodgers The Greatest American Popular Composer So Far?

Was Richard Rodgers The Greatest American Popular Composer So Far? 2002 is his Centennial. He may be less cool and more bourgeois than the other greats like Harold Arlen, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Frank Loesser, Cole Porter and Stephen Sondheim. But even the most cursory look at the long list of the wonderful songs he wrote(try the excellent song search feature), with Hart, then Hammerstein(and some other lyricists, including himself)makes it very difficult to deny there never was - and probably never will be - a more talented and versatile tunesmith. Miles Davis was right. He was a genius. And yet...[Flash required for the (interesting) intro]
posted by MiguelCardoso on Apr 18, 2002 - 41 comments

Page: 1 2