12 posts tagged with correlation.
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Your P-value is in another castle

Guess the Correlation: The aim of the game is simple. Try to guess how correlated the two variables in a scatter plot are. The closer your guess is to the true correlation, the better.
posted by Cash4Lead on Feb 1, 2016 - 25 comments

Too many ships and/or an obsolete economic indicator?

The Baltic’s BDI index, which gauges the cost of shipping resources including iron ore, cement, grain, coal and fertilizer, has dropped to 498 points and is over 95 percent down from its all-time high of 11,793 points in 2008 before the financial crisis first hurt the sector. This index can be used as an overall economic indicator as it shows where end prices are heading for items that use the raw materials that are shipped in dry bulk. It’s important to keep in mind, though, that what the index is measuring isn’t the use of those commodities, but the shipping of them. Judging by wait times at the Panama Canal, you'd think things are busy but that traffic jam seems to be easing. [more inside]
posted by karst on Nov 21, 2015 - 23 comments

Lead to crime -- 19th Century style

Lead Paint. It's been noted here before, but here's a new lead->crime connection, based on barn color:
Red (Iron oxide) good.
White (Lead) bad.
Here's where and when. And the year-old gasoline-soaked earlier Mother Jones citation [more inside]
posted by hexatron on Feb 24, 2015 - 32 comments

Additive-noise methods

How to tell correlation from causation - "The basic intuition behind the method demonstrated by Prof. Joris Mooij of the University of Amsterdam and his co-authors is surprisingly simple: if one event influences another, then the random noise in the causing event will be reflected in the affected event."
posted by kliuless on Jan 12, 2015 - 25 comments

Divorce rate in Mississippi correlates with Murders by bodily force

Spurious Correlations lets you dig through various data sources to find things that totally aren't causally related... or are they? [Related, previously] [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on May 9, 2014 - 26 comments

Greenbacks

Last week, I wrote about how urban trees—or the lack thereof—can reveal income inequality. After writing that article, I was curious, could I actually see income inequality from space? It turned out to be easier than I expected.
posted by infini on Jun 1, 2012 - 43 comments

Francis Galton

galton.org is an exhaustive website devoted to the life and works of the statistical pioneer and "father of eugenics" Francis Galton, inventor of the scatterplot, the correlation coefficient, fingerprint identification, and who knows what else. Almost all of Galton's books and papers are reproduced here, some in scanned form and some in searchable .pdf, from his major books to his letters to Pigeon Fancier's Journal. A short selection after the fold. [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Apr 25, 2012 - 11 comments

Causes Are Hard

Trials and Errors. Jonah Lehrer's latest piece in Wired is a sort of sequel to his earlier article in the New Yorker on the decline effect (previously). Where that article focused on the institutional factors interfering with the accumulation of truth, this one focuses on the philosophical issues of causation and correlation in modern science. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Jan 5, 2012 - 22 comments

"Correlation may not imply causation, but it sure can help us insinuate it."

Correlation or Causation? Statistics are easy: All you need are two graphs and a leading question.
posted by beaucoupkevin on Dec 13, 2011 - 29 comments

The Sixth Sense of Taste

Sweet, sour, bitter, salty, umami, and.... fat? Dr. Russell Keast, an Austrailian scientist who studies "perceived flavour, consumer acceptance and preference of foods and nutrition," has conducted research exploring humans' apparent sixth taste perception: fat. The kicker? Sensitivity to the taste of fat was negatively correlated with fat intake and BMI. Dr. Keast discussed the results of his latest research with Slashfood, and The Sydney Morning Herald. (via) [more inside]
posted by sentient on Mar 11, 2010 - 31 comments

Of course, the Red Sox did win this year...

Redskins lose. An interesting example of the logical fallacy known as Coincidental Correlation, for the last 71 years the Washington Redskins' last home game before Election Day has correlated with the success of the incumbent president. Boy, it's a good thing in sports no one believes in silly statistics...
posted by XQUZYPHYR on Oct 31, 2004 - 79 comments

Kids' bad habits blamed on movies

Kids' bad habits blamed on movies I too sneered and thought this was going to be another attack on media as the root cause of all problems. But the stats suggest a correlation that should be given some serious thought. Not talking about guns and school shootings but rather smoking and drinking. But then what of dope?
posted by Postroad on Mar 26, 2001 - 16 comments

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