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We eat ham and jam and spam a lot

We're Knights of the Round Table
We dance whene'er we're able.
We do routines and chorus scenes
With footwork impeccable.
We dine well here in Camelot.
We eat ham and jam and Spam a lot.
We're Knights of the Round Table.
Our shows are formidable,
But many times we're given rhymes
That are quite unsingable.
We're opera mad in Camelot.
We sing from the diaphragm a lot.
In war we're tough and able,
Quite indefatigable.
Between our quests we sequin vests and impersonate Clark Gable.
It's a busy life in Camelot.
posted by terrapin on Mar 11, 2005 - 43 comments

 

"When you see your own photo, do you say you're a fiction?"

“The problem is not to make political films but to make films politically.”
In "Tout Va Bien", just released on Criterion DVD, four years after May '68 Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin examine the wreckage: fading workers' empowerment (page with sound), media fatuity, capitalist sprawl, global imperialist mayhem, interpersonal disconnections. "Tout Va Bien" is the story of a strike at a factory as witnessed by an American reporter (Jane Fonda) and her has-been New Wave film director husband (Yves Montand). Included on the DVD is also Letter to Jane (1972), a short film in which Godard and Gorin spend an hour examining the semiotics of a single, hypnotizing photograph of Fonda as she shares feelings with a Vietnamese villager. More inside.
posted by matteo on Mar 8, 2005 - 18 comments

Not my BHAG

Big Hairy Audacious Goal or BHAG is Coaltion For Christian Outreach's newest evangelical ministry. It is an outreach program to make 750 commitment calls per year which will include spending five hours a week building one-on-one relationships with non-Christians, leading a small-group evangelistic Bible study each year, Training in relational evangelism for every leader, and staff teams spending time together each week in prayer for the lost.
In the 40's, A young man named Billy Graham started empowered the evangelical movement holding tent revivals and encouraging people to be missionaries. Born out of that was a more charged fundamentalist movement that we are famliar with today. Going from Billy to BHAG's begs the question, have Evangelicals evolved?
posted by Hands of Manos on Feb 15, 2005 - 28 comments

Cult Leader Buried Alive

Cult leader proves his divinity by being buried alive and resurrecting himself. Except for the resurrecting bit. Good show for trying though
posted by criticalbill on Dec 16, 2004 - 26 comments

Louis Feuillade, le Maître du cinéma

Detailing the impossible. Louis Feuillade made more than 800 films covering almost every contemporary genre: historical drama, comedy, realist drama, melodrama, religious films. However, he was most famous, or infamous, for his crime serials: Fantômas (1913-14), Les Vampires, Judex (1916), La Nouvelle Mission de Judex (1917), Tih-Minh (1918) and Barrabas (1919). Critics panned his crime films, often savagely, because the preoccupation of French critics and film-makers in the 1910s and 20s was to elevate cinema -– and, ironically, back then the French saw their own films as lacking the artistry and sophistication of American ones, by Griffith or DeMille – to the level of art. It was years before Feuillade's films escaped the label of aesthetic backwardness. Now, critics have realized that what Feuillade has done is to offer us an alternative cinematic mode to Griffiths', one that continues in updated variants throughout cinema. It is predicated on a principle of uncertainty, that questions our understanding of the real. It is as fluid and elusive a tradition as a cat burglar, dressed in black on a night-time rooftop.
posted by matteo on Nov 8, 2004 - 7 comments

"Wwhy should we remember anything? There is too much to remember now, too much to take in."

In search of lost time It was Jack Kerouac who first defined Robert Frank's genius, who found in it some echo of his own vision of a vast, broken-down, but still epic, America, peopled with restless and lonely dreamers. 'Robert Frank, Swiss, unobtrusive, nice,' wrote Kerouac in his now famous introduction to Frank's collection The Americans , 'with that little camera that he raises and snaps with one hand he sucked a sad poem right out of America on to film, taking rank among the tragic poets of the world'.
Frank's exhibition, Storylines, opens this week at the Tate Modern in London.
posted by matteo on Oct 27, 2004 - 6 comments

"George Washington was in a cult, and the cult was into aliens, man"

Dazed and Sued. Three Huntsville residents who say they went to high school with Austin film director Richard Linklater accused him of using them as the basis for the girl-chasing, drug-taking characters in his film "Dazed and Confused" in a lawsuit filed last week, 11 years after the movie was released
(Universal Studios, also included in the suit, is scheduled to release a special edition DVD of the movie Nov. 2.) More inside.
posted by matteo on Oct 12, 2004 - 62 comments

This Film is Just the Massacre of an Assassinator

Agitator. Blood doesn't politely trickle in Takashi Miike's films: it gushes out in (warning: NSFW, graphic) improbable fountains, painting walls and filling up small cars. His trademark point-of-view shots are taken from places other directors wouldn't dream of: the bottom of a dirty toilet bowl (as a man falls into it after being killed); within the ear canal (as it is pierced by a metal spike); even from inside a character's vagina. He has depicted incest, drug abuse, teenage prostitution, violence against women and children and small dogs, and necrophilia -- and that was just in one film, Visitor Q, his take on Pasolini's Teorema. Miike has just introduced his latest movie, Izo, at the Venice Film Festival (.pdf file). Miike is less sure about why Americans are now embracing Japanese horror films. His country's horror genre is influenced by "kwaidan," traditional Japanese ghost stories that feature revenge and malice: "The stories always have the 'hatedness.' You always bring the feelings of hate [that] you don't see in American cinema". What freaks him out the most, however, is the everyday automobile accident. "Even in a film, I can't bear to watch it -- it's so much (about) how people are weak, to be just crushed with a car. It makes me feel really depressed".
posted by matteo on Sep 22, 2004 - 24 comments

Evil Dead: The Musical

Evil Dead: The Musical
In making your list of should-be musical theater productions, you've likely considered the Evil Dead series, right? Fortunately for you, Montreal's Just for Laughs comedy festival has put together just that, believe it or not, for this year's festival.
A special run will happen in Toronto on the week of June 22nd before moving to Montreal for a full run.
posted by Evstar on Jun 12, 2004 - 10 comments

Interesting Motherfuckers

These people make for some "Interesting Motherfuckers."
posted by the biscuit man on Nov 28, 2003 - 17 comments

Bankrolling Ideology.

Bankrollers of ideology. George Soros vs. Rev. Moon.
posted by skallas on Nov 24, 2003 - 11 comments

This is just my racket...

Transformation in a weekend? Recently a friend told me he'd signed up for the Landmark Forum, a personal improvement seminar offered by the Landmark Education Corporation. I did some googling on LEC and found some very disturbing material. Since we're being all "fair and balanced" on MeFi now, I'll add I found some positive material too. Oh, and since my research tells me Landmark tends to be very litigious about negative publicity, I'll just cover my orange-feathered butt and say that my negative impressions of Landmark are only my opinion, not that of MetaFilter, and I could be wrong. Have any MeFiers had any experiences - positive or negative - with LEC?
posted by orange swan on Aug 17, 2003 - 47 comments

And finally, it's Joanna Southcott's box!

The Panacea Society is a small group in England that has existed since the 1920s, waiting for Jesus to return to Earth and move into the house they've set up for him in Bedford - the new Jerusalem. Built on the prophecies of Octavia, a vicar's widow obsessed with the prophecies of 18th/19th century English prophetess Joana Southcott, the Panaceans are the keepers of a box of prophecies left by Joanna. "War, disease, crime and banditry will increase until the Bishops open Joanna Southcott's box" is still being placed in newspapers on their behalf as they send out linen squares, breathed upon by Octavia before her death, that will, if placed in jugs of water, will heal and protect. Harmless neighborhood church group or money-grubbing cult? As they receive more attention (including a documentary shown on Channel 4) and their members slowly die off, it'll be interesting to see what happens...
posted by Katemonkey on Aug 16, 2003 - 5 comments

Jonestown

Alternative Considerations of Jonestown & Peoples Temple. Was it a religion, a revolutionary social movement, a cult, or a combination of them all?
posted by semmi on Nov 23, 2002 - 5 comments

Islamic saints.

Islamic saints. The linked article, while a bit disapproving ("There can be little doubt that Muhammad would be displeased if he could see what passes for Islam in much of the Muslim world today"), gives a good description of the cult of saints and their tombs in popular Islam. [More inside.]
posted by languagehat on Oct 6, 2002 - 8 comments

Sinister cult hijacks Weblogs.com?

Sinister cult hijacks Weblogs.com? While working on an application that finds patterns in the data supplied by Weblogs.com, Mo Morgan found some disturbing patterns:

"[...] between midnight and five there had been over 60 pings to Weblogs.com from sites that contained the string "srichinmoy" in their URI."

At first it just looks like some idiot abusing the ping system. Or could this be something altogether more sinister?
posted by dutchbint on Aug 30, 2002 - 30 comments

"Kids in the Hall: Braincandy"

"Kids in the Hall: Braincandy" is finally being released on DVD today! Sadly, it appears to be barren of any added extras, interviews or commentaries. This release is only just making me more anxious for the criminally underrated "The Wrong Guy" (starring and co-written by KITH member Dave Foley) that is scheduled to come out on September 24th. It is a must see for Kids in the Hall fans and the troops absurd brand of humour. (I won't even get into my insane anticipation for the perpetually postponed Mr.Show movie "Run Ronnie Run!")
posted by boost ventilator on Jul 16, 2002 - 20 comments

The 'Phantom Patriot'

The 'Phantom Patriot' wearing a skeleton mask, body armor and a costume emblazoned with the words "Phantom Patriot," infiltrated the 2,700-acre (1,090 hectare) Bohemian Grove, site of a secretive annual retreat featuring some of the most powerful men in the United States. He was arrested after a brief stand-off with police, and later told investigators he was prompted to act after hearing a Texas-based radio talk-show host discuss possible child sacrifice at the site.
posted by Stuart_R on Apr 18, 2002 - 14 comments

The last living member of the Heaven's Gate cult is auctioning off the leader's van on Ebay.
posted by Pinwheel on Mar 28, 2002 - 11 comments

Mel Lyman: The Harmonica Player Who Became God

Mel Lyman 1938-1978. Mel Lyman was controversial. He was the brilliant folk musician who soothed the Dylan-ruffled crowd at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, the Fort Hill guru whose prose in the undergound newspaper Avatar shocked conservative Bostonians of the late 60s... Many years of collecting, and help from numerous people has resulted in the large collection of articles reproduced here. Some say Lyman was God... others that he was a devil... but most of these articles show him as a charismatic individual somewhere between those two extremes. An exhaustively authoritative page about a very interesting harmonica player who became God. And, man, does this bring back the 60s...(Details within)
posted by y2karl on Mar 24, 2002 - 21 comments

Al Qaeda as death cult.

Al Qaeda as death cult. From The Monde Diplomatique: "Al-Qaida has been thought of as a global or national political movement, or representative of an entire religion. It isn't. It's just another of the many death-obsessed sectarian movements to emerge in the past 20 years."

posted by talos on Jan 18, 2002 - 3 comments

Pity the poor moped. Not really a scooter, nor a motorcycle, yet more than a bike. The Moped Army (motto: "2-Stroke Power. Swarm and Destroy") attempts to bring some respect, or at least, geeky cult-like fanatacism, to this underappreciated mode of transportation.
posted by 40 Watt on Jan 9, 2002 - 10 comments

Cassiopaea Cult Lead By Cold War Physicist

Cassiopaea Cult Lead By Cold War Physicist This is a Florida cult that talks to aliens on a Quija board. The aliens warn the cult members that the rest of us are possessed by Lizards from another dimension. Anyway, the cult is lead by an old Cold War era high-energy physicist from Poland. Is it me, or should I worry that this kind of a person has a web site with Armageddon in the title bar? Also, the obligatory parody site is at 64.27.67.250.
posted by StormBear on Dec 10, 2001 - 2 comments

Anthrax,

Anthrax, its been done before. It just doesn't do the job: "the cult attempted to release anthrax spores from its mid-rise Tokyo office building laboratory. At that time, police and media reported foul smells, brown steam, some pet deaths, and stains on cars and sidewalks." 2, 3. "Many view the cult Aum Shinrikyo as a group seeking to bring on the end of the world." and "an estimated $1.5 billion in assets" (thats more than Usama). me=alarmist, today.
posted by tomplus2 on Oct 17, 2001 - 5 comments

Scientologists accused of misrepresenting themselves during the terror attack crisis

Scientologists accused of misrepresenting themselves during the terror attack crisis This cult filled with terrible people (at the top) and saps below. Note the service they claim to provide during the crisis. The problem is that in America (unlike German, say) any one claiming to be religious gets away with whatever madness or evil they want.
posted by Postroad on Sep 18, 2001 - 25 comments

Yes sir, that's my cloned alien baby!

Yes sir, that's my cloned alien baby! I was concerned about this article from cnn about Clonaid going ahead with cloning a human. And then I found out Clonaid was stared by a religious group that believes ETs used genetic engineering to create life on earth. Legitimate news item or bad X-files script? (posted by Miss-Lapin)
posted by miss-lapin on Jul 3, 2001 - 4 comments

Spare the rod? Heck no! God says beat and pimp your child!

Spare the rod? Heck no! God says beat and pimp your child! "House of Prayer" cult encourages group beatings of children in church. "Reverend" encourages marriages of 14-year-olds to "prevent potential whores." He also discusses genitalia and hikes up skirts during services. He's not the unaspanker, he's much worse.
posted by darren on Mar 29, 2001 - 13 comments

Even the bad guys

Even the bad guys have PR sites these days. From the cuddly looks of this buddhist sect leader, you'd never have assumed he was responsible for the only large-scale act of terrorism in Japan in recent memory (the Tokyo subway Sarin gassing).
posted by Neb on Jan 16, 2001 - 5 comments

Does "Battlefield Earth" make anyone else nervous?

Does "Battlefield Earth" make anyone else nervous? The film has a deep connection to the church of Scientology - an organization that has seen a certain amount of controversy (though I don't wish to belittle the belief system of anyone). This connection seems to have gone unnoticed. Is there cause for concern when a heavily marketed film is surreptiously tied to an organized religion?
posted by aladfar on May 11, 2000 - 27 comments

It's like a party in my monitor.

It's like a party in my monitor. I adore TV Party. Tons of old commercials, show snippets, and jingles. But most importantly, Supertrain, the show that seemed bad then and is even worse now! (Yet its theme stuck in my head for days on end....)
posted by hijinx on Apr 26, 2000 - 0 comments

'Is the glass half empty of half full? That all depends upon who is looking at it. The case is similar with the Bible. For thousands of years man has been putting his own spin on Religion and the Scriptures and now so can you. Simply select the beliefs that are most advantageous to you and ‘The Cult Construction Set’ will generate actual Bible scriptures to support these beliefs. Now you too can start your own Cult in the comfort of your home!'
posted by tdecius on Nov 13, 1999 - 1 comment

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