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"A film that instead of making sense is sense."

Jamestown Baloos (1957) [SLYT] by Robert Breer [PDF] (previously) "is a frenetic, three-part stop-motion animation that features an army of everyday forms and figures — geometric shapes, a piece of string, newspaper clips, a pin-up girl, even Napoleon Bonaparte — flashing across the screen. Placed in increasingly compromised situations and choreographed to a jingoistic tune, the figures essentially become puppets of their former selves. Such unrelenting visuals recall not only Fernand Léger’s early experimental film, Ballet Mécanique (1924), as Breer himself has mentioned, but also early twentieth-century Dadaist collage. Dada artists like Kurt Schwitters and Hannah Höch created witty, unapologetic works that reflected the chaos and violence of modern existence. Jamestown Baloos serves, as their works did, as a pointed indictment on the absurdity of war."
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 8, 2014 - 2 comments

 

A WEEK OF KINDNESS: a novel in collage

SUNDAY. Element: Mud. Exemplar: The Lion of Belfort.
MONDAY. Element: Water. Exemplar: Water.
TUESDAY. Element: Fire. Exemplar: The Court of Dragons.
WEDNESDAY. Element: Blood. Exemplar: Œdipus. [Certain images NSFW on account of Victorian prurience] [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Oct 30, 2013 - 7 comments

The Dada Baroness, Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven (1874-1927) was born in Germany, moved to the U.S. (and was arrested for wearing men's clothes in 1910) and lived in New York City from 1913-1923. She may have been involved with the submission of Fountain to the 1917 exhibition of the Society of Independent Artists (Previously); she also made an assemblage Portrait of Marcel Duchamp, and the plumbing assemblage God is attributed to her, photographed by 1918 flu epidemic casualty Morton Schamberg. She was known to wear a coal scuttle as a hat, with postage stamps on her cheeks; historians have called her America's first performance artist. In the 1920s she was friends with Jamaican-American writer Claude McKay. Her writing was preserved by Djuna Barnes and was finally published in 2011 by MIT Press as Body Sweats: The Uncensored Writings of Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven edited by her biographer Irene Gammel and Suzanne Zelazo
posted by larrybob on Sep 11, 2013 - 2 comments

X-Acto-Mundo: Winston Smith

The Art of Punk: Winston Smith, collage artist. [SLYT]
posted by Rykey on Aug 13, 2013 - 5 comments

dada Richter dada Film dada Richter dadadadadadadadada

To create a vision of the harmony of the unequal, balance the infinite variety, the chaotic, the contradictions in a unity.
Hans Richter is renowned as the godfather of avant garde film.
Three excerpts from a new film about his work Everything Turns - Everything Revolves.
Richter taught at City College New York in the 40's and 50's after fleeing Europe.
To further explain the first show of his work in the USA since 1968 (which finishes shortly) LACMA has made this short: -
Hans Richter's Germany about where he lived between Art and Politics.
Some of his film has already featured in a couple of great posts on the blue Previously.
Richter at Senses of Cinema, Activism, Modernism and the Avant-garde (pdf) and in his own words. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Aug 8, 2013 - 5 comments

La Petite Mélancolie - Photographic Life

La Petite Mélancolie (NSFW)
Is mainly a French photo blog which has plenty of excellent timesink in it. From Hannah Hoch to Romy Schneider and from Edward Steichen to Jorge Caceres
It is difficult to describe this site which sometimes verges on the pornographic but also has many pages on surrealists such as Paul Eluard and Jacques Prevert,
as well as other avant garde people such as the Czechs Karel Tiege and Milan Kundra.
posted by adamvasco on May 25, 2013 - 7 comments

"Fümms bö wä tää zää Uu, pögiff, kwii Ee".

A podcast about Merzbarn, the final project in Cumbria, England of Kurt Schwitters, Collagist, Sound Poet (See previous), Dadaist, Sculptur. His previous project Merzbau had been lost and then found.
posted by adamvasco on Jan 1, 2013 - 9 comments

Eh oh ehh-uh-EH-oh

Disney meets Dada: Intensive Gaston Unit [SLYTP]
posted by Rory Marinich on Nov 8, 2012 - 35 comments

"I just want people to see it, and tell me what a good boy I am."

Gerry Matthews, the voice of Sugar Bear, created and curates the Museum of Un-Natural History.
posted by wallabear on Jul 4, 2012 - 10 comments

Dada Da Dada Da Dum

Professional writers may scoff, / But limericks? Never enough! / Let crummy-dot-com / Fill your needs with aplomb / (The meter's occasionally off) [more inside]
posted by wanderingmind on Jun 19, 2012 - 79 comments

dadadadadada....puppets.....da da..da da..da da

The female members of the Dada movement are not so well known.
Sophie Taeuber was into puppets as was Hannah Höch; 2 & 3 and Emmy Hennings. Taeuber and Hennings were both heavily involved in Cabaret Voltaire.
A brief history of Radical Puppetry (Hannah Höch previously).
posted by adamvasco on May 7, 2012 - 15 comments

The One Where phoebe can't tell if it is even day or night because of all the crows that follow her everywhere

Friends Reimagined #theonewhere is a hashtag that is increasing in popularity and strangeness, used by twitizens to reminisce about Friends episodes which may or may not have actually happened.
posted by nímwunnan on May 3, 2012 - 45 comments

The other side of YouTube.

TVTropes calls it a "Neo-Dada art form consisting of video remixes. . . to confuse, stun or entertain the viewer". A recent top ten list (more here) fills the gaps of that description with ample WTF, which is almost too appropriate for a video genre that first garnered attention as a misdirection troll. [more inside]
posted by I've wasted my life on Jan 26, 2012 - 33 comments

"The rhythm of a work is equal to the idea of the whole."

Berlin, circa 1921: The painter Hans Richter turns his talents to film and produces one of the earliest abstract films, Rhythmus 21. Clocking in at just over three minutes, it's a significant departure from the newsreels, romances, cliff-hangers, and penny-dreadfuls that made up the bulk of film production in the early ’20s—the first decade in which the film industry began to play a major economic and cultural role around the world. [more inside]
posted by scody on Jun 14, 2011 - 9 comments

Around and around and around we go.

Anémic Cinéma is the only film that Marcel Duchamp is credited with directing.
It's a short, just over six minutes, and was made using rotoreliefs.
You can play with some here and here.
Optical illusions present images which are "true" but inconsistent.
Inconsistency, Anemic Cinema, and the Rotoreliefs - Michael Betancourt. (Duchamp previously 1; 2;)
posted by adamvasco on Dec 15, 2010 - 4 comments

I see.

I'd rather measure the diameter of a dove than go barter-shopping with a frilly lion. (Lots of Previously.)
posted by blue funk on Apr 30, 2010 - 21 comments

The images of 9 0 0 0

The images of 9 0 0 0
posted by boo_radley on Sep 4, 2009 - 55 comments

Karl Waldmann's Collages

The Karl Waldmann Museum, where you can see all of his collages.
posted by OmieWise on Jun 11, 2009 - 6 comments

"I attach even more importance to the spectator than to the artist."

Somewhere between dada and surrealist, Marcel Duchamp revolutionized art with his "readymades," a term for found objects taken directly from society. Except, maybe they weren't. [more inside]
posted by Damn That Television on Jun 1, 2009 - 60 comments

The Man Who Pissed Off Hitler

Artist John Heartfield was one of those who recognized the threat of Nazism early on. Remarkably, he created his anti-fascist art inside Germany, until 1933 when Hitler came to power. He continued to pointedly satirize the Reich (and those who made it possible, as his bitter image of the League of Nations illustrates) from exile in Czechoslovakia. The nature of his work makes it very clear that Hitler's goals and intentions were obvious well before the war. (via)
posted by CheeseDigestsAll on May 10, 2009 - 30 comments

Jolifanto Bambla O Falli Bambla!

In 1916, Hugo Ball would fulfill his own dadaist manifesto by reciting his own nonsense poetry at the Cabaret Voltaire (not that Cabaret Voltaire), while wearing a Cubist costume or a cylinder with the number 13 covering his face. Ball's poem, Gadji Beri Bimba, inspired the Talking Heads song, I Zimbra, but his most famous poem is Karawane, a pioneering example of sound poetry. Karawane has more conventional avant-garde versions on YouTube, but none is more surreal than the recitation from memory by Marie Osmond (yes, that Marie Osmond) from a 1980s broadcast of Ripley's Believe It Or Not!
posted by jonp72 on Mar 9, 2009 - 21 comments

Bid two Sluggos

5 Card Nancy A neo-Dada game invented by Scott McCloud, in the tradition of the Exquisite Corpse. It works by emphasizing the tendency to draw connections between juxtaposed frames, to impose meaning where none exists. Play the solitaire version here.
posted by klangklangston on Dec 2, 2008 - 32 comments

Fun for kids!

'the plausible impossibility of death in the mind of cartoon characters' via [more inside]
posted by cjorgensen on Nov 10, 2008 - 37 comments

Vormittagsspuk

Flying derbys! Revolving revolvers! Ladders to nowhere! It's Hans Richter's wonderful Vormittagsspuk (or, Ghosts Before Breakfast), certainly one of the most playful and entertaining of all the Dada film experiments of the 1920s. Presented here with a nicely done soundtrack by Donald Sosin. . [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 20, 2008 - 9 comments

This is an Andy Rooney post. That would be an Andy Rooney post worth celebrating.

The Andy Rooney Game. Here’s how you play: take out everything but the first sentence and the last sentence from Andy Rooney’s latest segment on 60 Minutes. Then you put that on youtube. That’s it! Check it out:
posted by hellbient on Jun 2, 2008 - 64 comments

Fafblog's back baby! Have some pie!

After nearly 21 months of hiatus, whimsical politics blog Fafblog is back! And it's redesigned, too! Right now I would ordinarily include a link to best posts of the past, but I would have to include all of them.
posted by JHarris on Apr 3, 2008 - 49 comments

20th Century Avant-Garde

20th Century Avant-Garde is a great resource guide to experimental art from 1900 onwards. Special sections for dada, the situationists and fluxus. You can also browse by categories such as artists, film and video art, movements in art, publishers and many more. If you're interested in experimental art of the 20th Century you can get lost in this site for hours.
posted by Kattullus on Jan 23, 2008 - 8 comments

Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp

Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp - an animated timeline of the artist's life and works.
posted by Burhanistan on Aug 7, 2007 - 21 comments

Poems and Drawings of the Girl Born Without A Mother

Fan of Caresses/Supreme Discharged Toilette Ron Padgett's 1968 translations of the 18 drawing-poems from Francis Picabia's poetry collection Poèmes et dessins de la fille née sans mère, from the latest issue of onedit. Much more Picabia inside. [via this from Ron Silliman]
posted by mediareport on Aug 6, 2007 - 10 comments

La idea inicia su proceso de superación del objeto y establece una descontextualización Dadá.

Chema Madoz -- photos
posted by amberglow on Jun 28, 2007 - 29 comments

Smokey Stover

Foo! Notary sojac! 1506 nix nix!
posted by JHarris on May 18, 2007 - 20 comments

PSST! Pass It On…

PSST! Pass It On…
posted by ijoshua on May 8, 2007 - 8 comments

Mummenschanz on the Muppets

Mummenschanz on the Muppets Footage of swiss mime troop, Mummenschanz... [2, 3, 4]
posted by drezdn on Apr 24, 2007 - 37 comments

The pataphysical world of Fred Lane.

I talk to my haircut. The Rev. Dr. Fred Lane was a dada jazzbo as part of the Raudelunas scene in Tuscaloosa, Alabama in the 70s and 80s. His real name is T. R. Reed, and he's a creator of wonderful whirligigs. There's also a documentary in the works (careful of your eyes on that page).
posted by sleepy pete on Mar 27, 2007 - 13 comments

"There has never really been any modernity, never any real progress, never any assured liberation."

Meditations on: the poetic and profane; on silence; death; catastrophe; Cage — and yet more strangeness and beauty from David Ralph Lichtensteiger's travels within the world of 20th C. avant garde music and postmodernism.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Sep 17, 2006 - 2 comments

Dada: Zurich, Berlin, Hannover, Cologne, New York, Paris

In less than a month the cabaret, which at first had welcomed all modern tendencies in the arts and hoped to entertain and educate the customer, had turned into a theater of the absurd. That was the intention. "What we are celebrating," Ball wrote in his diary, "is both buffoonery and a requiem mass."The scandal spread. Lenin, who played chess with Tzara, wanted to know what Dada was all about. (Previously 1, 2, 3)
posted by anotherpanacea on Aug 29, 2006 - 10 comments

Nashville Singer's Career Immortalized by Blind Man's Penis

Ramsey Kearney was a teenage country music prodigy nicknamed the Dixie Farmboy, a rockabilly singer with the Jimmie Martin Combo, a songwriter for Brenda Lee, and a producer of the most cloying Elvis tribute single ever recorded. Kearney would have almost no connection to alternative music whatsoever until John Trubee, a notorious crank phone caller and sideman for Zoogz Rift, found an ad in the back of the Midnight Globe tabloid from Kearney's Nashco Records label, a song-poem company offering to put his words to music for a small fee. Trubee sent his own disturbing LSD-fueled lyrics to Nashco, but to his surprise, Nashco accepted the lyrics after taking a $79.95 fee from Trubee. Kearney tweaked the lyrics slightly in order to avoid a lawsuit from Stevie Wonder, but the end product was the cult classic novelty song, Blind Man's Penis. (more inside)
posted by jonp72 on Aug 3, 2006 - 12 comments

Choosing a Web 2.0 Start Up Name

DADA Hits the MOMA. DaDaism was an art movement that arose prior to the rubble of WW1 where the artists led a creative revolution that shaped the course of modern art by combining different mediums to create a message of protest and hope. The MOMA exhibit tells one story (scroll to data and select full program - req flash 7) and the New Yorker reaffirms the influence on art today. However, the real story is with Richard Huelsenbeck, the ring leader and founder of the DaDa movement An interview with him from December 1960 (45 mins mp3) explains the start - as one of the few German artists in protest to the war. My favourite part is where he tells of picking out the name DaDa from an encyclopedia at a cabaret.
posted by Funmonkey1 on Jul 19, 2006 - 23 comments

No, I'm not sure how they get it to not devolve into a wall of feedback... though that'd be pretty rad too.

A Piano In A Gallery. David Cunningham (the guy behind The Flying Lizards! Wikipedia because the main at-least-quasi-official site's down, but while you wait 16 days for that, why not read this interview with Deborah Lizard for your FL Fix) and his new project... A Piano In A Gallery. No, he's not actually PLAYING the piano -- the visitors are. It's a sort of similar thing to both Brian Eno's gallery work with ambient tape loops on different time cycles, creating an ever-shifting collage of sound and David Byrne's recent Playing The Building. The room is mic'd, and the sound is run through a piano, and amplified, both bringing background noises to the foreground AND creating feedback-style loops, as those sounds are also run into the mics and so forth. So... if you happen to be in London.... [via WFMU]
posted by Rev. Syung Myung Me on Jul 15, 2006 - 5 comments

"Art's only sane option, in its impotence, was to go nuts too."

When Artists Took Over the Asylum [NYT]: A 450 piece Dada exhibit opens Sunday at MoMA in New York. The collection features works from such Dada greats as Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Jean "Hans" Arp, Hannah Höch, and Baroness Elsa Von Freytag-Loringhoven.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Jun 17, 2006 - 10 comments

Black Monk Time

The Monks
Formed in the early '60s by American G.I.s stationed in Germany. After their discharge, the group settled in Germany to concentrate on finding a unique sound, and soon began to shave their hair into Monk's tonsures and appear in cassocks. One of the truely original bands of the 60's, The Monks are now often refered to as 'proto-punk'. The Monks experimented fervently, developing a unqiue sound, with heavy bass, repetitive but amelodic rhythms, nursery rhyme style, yet powerful vocals and a good helping of feedback. They recorded only one albumn, Black Monk Time, until their 1999 reunion.
Hear some tracks from the albumn (in realmedia), See and hear The Monks Live in Germany, Also, check out Monks - The Transatlantic Feedback, a documentary (with trailer, though there seems to be something wrong with it). [Trivia: the song I Hate You can be heard in the background in one scene in the bowling alley in The Big Lebowski]
posted by MetaMonkey on Apr 21, 2006 - 24 comments

Metafilter: zimzim urallala zimzim urallala zimzim zanzibar zimzalla zam

Whereas: Dada is a virgin microbe which penetrates with the insistence of air into all those spaces that reason has failed to fill with words and conventions. .

The mayor of Lawrence, Kansas proclaims February 4, April 1, March 28, July 15, August 2, August 7, August 16, August 26, September 18, September 22, October 1, October 17, and October 26, 2006 as International Dadaism Month.
posted by billysumday on Feb 28, 2006 - 58 comments

Does your Qwert Shmarble juice emus?

The mystery of Qwert Shmarble--solved! If you've ever wondered how stunningly useful items like Qwert Shmarble end up on Amazon, here's the inside story, from the former Amazon temp who wrote the user manual to the NM-156 Reciprocating Emu Press.
posted by yankeefog on Dec 5, 2005 - 16 comments

We had a dim premonition that power-mad gangsters would one day use art itself as a way of deadening men’s minds.

The Digital Dada Library. Because "any attempt to conciliate an inexplicable momentary state with logic strikes me as a boring kind of game."
posted by The Jesse Helms on Nov 11, 2005 - 10 comments

Cut With The Kitchen Knife

Hannah Höch was one of the great queer female artists of the 20th century and one of the brilliant minds behind the Berlin DaDa Movement. One of the pioneers of photomontage, Höch's work is still among the best in the medium even today.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Jan 28, 2005 - 5 comments

Es wie wie dies und wie das und wie dies, und..

Es wie wie dies und wie das und wie dies, und. Vibrant demonstration of why your favorite hip-hop artist is unlikely to be German. Link via little black dada cat.
posted by dickumbrage on Dec 25, 2004 - 24 comments

books, pamphlets, and periodicals

I was wandering around the internets looking for early twentieth century ephemera and look what I found. Digital Dada Library “This page provides links to some of the major Dada-era publications in the International Dada Archive. These books, pamphlets, and periodicals are housed in the Special Collections Department of the University of Iowa Libraries. …Each document has been scanned in its entirety.” EphemeraNow “is a family-friendly Web site dedicated to the commercial art of mid-century America.” The Ephemera Society “is a non-profit body concerned with the collection, preservation, study and educational uses of printed and handwritten ephemera.” and more! For those of you who have complained that this place is getting too “US politics-filter” I give you Glasgow Digital Library Collections which has all sorts of stuff including a great history of the labour movement in Glasgow 1910-1932
posted by Grod on Oct 26, 2004 - 10 comments

We need to restore the spirit of irreverence in music.

The Pierre Boulez Project. (via Alex Ross)
posted by kenko on Aug 17, 2004 - 3 comments

In The Canyons Of Your Mind

Life's like that isn’t it? Only the other day I was walking in the west end and... suddenly I was set upon by hordes of fans and admirers who wanted to... touch my clothes. So I took sanctuary in a nearby cinema. Normally of course I don't go in but... that day I saw something that... really moved me I'd like to share this...wonderful experience with you it was... (more inside gentle reader)
posted by longbaugh on Aug 12, 2004 - 16 comments

Flash Mobs go Global

Flash Mobs are cool. A couple hundred people spontaneously assemble in seconds, applaud (or ask for books, or do the robot), and leave. There are several ways to take part, if you're so inclined.
posted by Tlogmer on Jul 31, 2003 - 47 comments

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