25 posts tagged with dada and art.
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"the mainstreaming of Dadaism"

The Cult of Jeff Koons 🐩
posted by Invisible Green Time-Lapse Peloton on Oct 14, 2014 - 58 comments

Use Photography as a Weapon

The Extraordinary Anti-Nazi Photomontages of John Heartfield, a dadist who collaborated with George Grosz and had a lifelong friend in Brecht.
This is a tribute website from his grandson.
Heartfield pioneered photomontage and inspired Siouxsie and the Banshees Metal Postcard.
Essay from the Getty and a little more.
(Previously ''The Man who Pissed off Hitler.'' but fpp links are dead.)
posted by adamvasco on Jun 9, 2014 - 10 comments

A WEEK OF KINDNESS: a novel in collage

SUNDAY. Element: Mud. Exemplar: The Lion of Belfort.
MONDAY. Element: Water. Exemplar: Water.
TUESDAY. Element: Fire. Exemplar: The Court of Dragons.
WEDNESDAY. Element: Blood. Exemplar: Œdipus. [Certain images NSFW on account of Victorian prurience] [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Oct 30, 2013 - 7 comments

The Dada Baroness, Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven (1874-1927) was born in Germany, moved to the U.S. (and was arrested for wearing men's clothes in 1910) and lived in New York City from 1913-1923. She may have been involved with the submission of Fountain to the 1917 exhibition of the Society of Independent Artists (Previously); she also made an assemblage Portrait of Marcel Duchamp, and the plumbing assemblage God is attributed to her, photographed by 1918 flu epidemic casualty Morton Schamberg. She was known to wear a coal scuttle as a hat, with postage stamps on her cheeks; historians have called her America's first performance artist. In the 1920s she was friends with Jamaican-American writer Claude McKay. Her writing was preserved by Djuna Barnes and was finally published in 2011 by MIT Press as Body Sweats: The Uncensored Writings of Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven edited by her biographer Irene Gammel and Suzanne Zelazo
posted by larrybob on Sep 11, 2013 - 2 comments

"I just want people to see it, and tell me what a good boy I am."

Gerry Matthews, the voice of Sugar Bear, created and curates the Museum of Un-Natural History.
posted by wallabear on Jul 4, 2012 - 10 comments

dadadadadada....puppets.....da da..da da..da da

The female members of the Dada movement are not so well known.
Sophie Taeuber was into puppets as was Hannah Höch; 2 & 3 and Emmy Hennings. Taeuber and Hennings were both heavily involved in Cabaret Voltaire.
A brief history of Radical Puppetry (Hannah Höch previously).
posted by adamvasco on May 7, 2012 - 15 comments

"The rhythm of a work is equal to the idea of the whole."

Berlin, circa 1921: The painter Hans Richter turns his talents to film and produces one of the earliest abstract films, Rhythmus 21. Clocking in at just over three minutes, it's a significant departure from the newsreels, romances, cliff-hangers, and penny-dreadfuls that made up the bulk of film production in the early ’20s—the first decade in which the film industry began to play a major economic and cultural role around the world. [more inside]
posted by scody on Jun 14, 2011 - 9 comments

The images of 9 0 0 0

The images of 9 0 0 0
posted by boo_radley on Sep 4, 2009 - 55 comments

Karl Waldmann's Collages

The Karl Waldmann Museum, where you can see all of his collages.
posted by OmieWise on Jun 11, 2009 - 6 comments

"I attach even more importance to the spectator than to the artist."

Somewhere between dada and surrealist, Marcel Duchamp revolutionized art with his "readymades," a term for found objects taken directly from society. Except, maybe they weren't. [more inside]
posted by Damn That Television on Jun 1, 2009 - 60 comments

The Man Who Pissed Off Hitler

Artist John Heartfield was one of those who recognized the threat of Nazism early on. Remarkably, he created his anti-fascist art inside Germany, until 1933 when Hitler came to power. He continued to pointedly satirize the Reich (and those who made it possible, as his bitter image of the League of Nations illustrates) from exile in Czechoslovakia. The nature of his work makes it very clear that Hitler's goals and intentions were obvious well before the war. (via)
posted by CheeseDigestsAll on May 10, 2009 - 30 comments

20th Century Avant-Garde

20th Century Avant-Garde is a great resource guide to experimental art from 1900 onwards. Special sections for dada, the situationists and fluxus. You can also browse by categories such as artists, film and video art, movements in art, publishers and many more. If you're interested in experimental art of the 20th Century you can get lost in this site for hours.
posted by Kattullus on Jan 23, 2008 - 8 comments

Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp

Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp - an animated timeline of the artist's life and works.
posted by Burhanistan on Aug 7, 2007 - 21 comments

Poems and Drawings of the Girl Born Without A Mother

Fan of Caresses/Supreme Discharged Toilette Ron Padgett's 1968 translations of the 18 drawing-poems from Francis Picabia's poetry collection Poèmes et dessins de la fille née sans mère, from the latest issue of onedit. Much more Picabia inside. [via this from Ron Silliman]
posted by mediareport on Aug 6, 2007 - 10 comments

La idea inicia su proceso de superación del objeto y establece una descontextualización Dadá.

Chema Madoz -- photos
posted by amberglow on Jun 28, 2007 - 29 comments

PSST! Pass It On…

PSST! Pass It On…
posted by ijoshua on May 8, 2007 - 8 comments

The pataphysical world of Fred Lane.

I talk to my haircut. The Rev. Dr. Fred Lane was a dada jazzbo as part of the Raudelunas scene in Tuscaloosa, Alabama in the 70s and 80s. His real name is T. R. Reed, and he's a creator of wonderful whirligigs. There's also a documentary in the works (careful of your eyes on that page).
posted by sleepy pete on Mar 27, 2007 - 13 comments

Choosing a Web 2.0 Start Up Name

DADA Hits the MOMA. DaDaism was an art movement that arose prior to the rubble of WW1 where the artists led a creative revolution that shaped the course of modern art by combining different mediums to create a message of protest and hope. The MOMA exhibit tells one story (scroll to data and select full program - req flash 7) and the New Yorker reaffirms the influence on art today. However, the real story is with Richard Huelsenbeck, the ring leader and founder of the DaDa movement An interview with him from December 1960 (45 mins mp3) explains the start - as one of the few German artists in protest to the war. My favourite part is where he tells of picking out the name DaDa from an encyclopedia at a cabaret.
posted by Funmonkey1 on Jul 19, 2006 - 23 comments

"Art's only sane option, in its impotence, was to go nuts too."

When Artists Took Over the Asylum [NYT]: A 450 piece Dada exhibit opens Sunday at MoMA in New York. The collection features works from such Dada greats as Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Jean "Hans" Arp, Hannah Höch, and Baroness Elsa Von Freytag-Loringhoven.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Jun 17, 2006 - 10 comments

Cut With The Kitchen Knife

Hannah Höch was one of the great queer female artists of the 20th century and one of the brilliant minds behind the Berlin DaDa Movement. One of the pioneers of photomontage, Höch's work is still among the best in the medium even today.
posted by grapefruitmoon on Jan 28, 2005 - 5 comments

books, pamphlets, and periodicals

I was wandering around the internets looking for early twentieth century ephemera and look what I found. Digital Dada Library “This page provides links to some of the major Dada-era publications in the International Dada Archive. These books, pamphlets, and periodicals are housed in the Special Collections Department of the University of Iowa Libraries. …Each document has been scanned in its entirety.” EphemeraNow “is a family-friendly Web site dedicated to the commercial art of mid-century America.” The Ephemera Society “is a non-profit body concerned with the collection, preservation, study and educational uses of printed and handwritten ephemera.” and more! For those of you who have complained that this place is getting too “US politics-filter” I give you Glasgow Digital Library Collections which has all sorts of stuff including a great history of the labour movement in Glasgow 1910-1932
posted by Grod on Oct 26, 2004 - 10 comments

In The Canyons Of Your Mind

Life's like that isn’t it? Only the other day I was walking in the west end and... suddenly I was set upon by hordes of fans and admirers who wanted to... touch my clothes. So I took sanctuary in a nearby cinema. Normally of course I don't go in but... that day I saw something that... really moved me I'd like to share this...wonderful experience with you it was... (more inside gentle reader)
posted by longbaugh on Aug 12, 2004 - 16 comments

Art or Crap?

Art or Crap? A quiz.
posted by dydecker on Jun 3, 2003 - 25 comments

The bride stripped bare by her bachelors, even

The bride stripped bare by her bachelors, even is usually referred to as The Large Glass but whatever the name, what is it? Also, did Marcel Duchamp hide the stitches in plain site? For that matter, when did he find the time to make music? Would hearing him in his own words help us make sense of him? What do his Francophone fans think? Does it require a lifetime of devotion to get a handle on his work? How about dragging his readymades into the lab and putting them under the microscope? If not answers then more questions can surely be found in the Duchamp world community or perhaps on its bulletin board. But, really, I suppose it doesn't matter how you encounter Duchamp just so long as you do.
posted by xian on Aug 16, 2002 - 13 comments

The University of Iowa, of all unlikely places, maintains the International Dada Archive. I suppose someone had to try, since almost no one understands it. There you can not only view images, but download PDFs—page by page, unfortunately—of many Dadaist publications. Most of them are in various non-English languages, but still worth looking at just for the visual design. And yes, the urinal is there, but you'll have to find it yourself.
[via Consumptive]
posted by Su on Mar 17, 2002 - 8 comments

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