304 posts tagged with data.
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Leaving Everywhere

I've looked at the US Census Bureau data, and the numbers don't lie. They paint a dire picture. On top of all that they closed one of my favorite mac & cheese joints. Look, I still love this place. Sometimes. But I'm done with wherever I am. Best of luck to those who stay wherever they are.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Aug 27, 2015 - 34 comments

Map of Jazz

Map of Jazz A visualization of collaboration in jazz through mapping players by session, for roughly 14,000 sessions. Full methodology described here (PDF)
posted by klangklangston on Aug 24, 2015 - 13 comments

The Internet of Poops

How Ted Benson hacked Amazon Dash (the $5 WiFi enabled single product order button) to track baby data.
posted by Artw on Aug 18, 2015 - 68 comments

Ethereum Launched

In case you missed it Ethereum announced its first developer release a week ago. What is Ethereum? According to the video it's a "planetary scale computer powered by blockchain technology." Given the breathlessness, some skepticism is in order, but what if it purports to do on the tin is true? [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Aug 7, 2015 - 56 comments

Breed-Solomon

Since it folds in three dimensions, we could store all of the world’s current data—everyone’s photos, every Facebook status update, all of Wikipedia, everything—using less than an ounce of DNA. And, with its propensity to replicate given the right conditions, millions of copies of DNA can be made in the lab in just a few hours. Such favorable traits make DNA an ideal candidate for storing lots of informations, for a long time, in a small space.
But how stable is DNA? The Reed-Solomon method, long used to error-check data transmission and duplication, is now being explored as an adjunct to the long-term archiving of information encoded in DNA. A post by Alex Riley at the PBS Science blog NOVA/NEXT.
posted by Rumple on Jul 30, 2015 - 35 comments

Fitted

Activity trackers train users to love lives that are all work.
posted by almostmanda on Jul 29, 2015 - 133 comments

Cargo cult of personality

The IBM Watson Personality Insights service uses linguistic analytics to extract a spectrum of cognitive and social characteristics from the text data that a person generates through blogs, tweets, forum posts, and more. Just enter a chunk of text with at least 100 recognized words and Watson will break down your (or Hitler's or Donald Trump's) personality compared to other participants. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 27, 2015 - 80 comments

After Capitalism, Humanism

Shared Prosperity, Common Wealth, National Equity and a Citizen's Dividend: Nirit Peled takes a look at social experiments in basic incomes for VPRO Tegenlicht, a Dutch public television documentary series. Starting with a German crowdfunded UBI chosen by raffle -- kind of like the opposite of Le Guin's Omelas (or Shirley Jackson's Lottery in reverse) -- the focus moves on to Albert Wenger who wants to disconnect work from income not only as automation progresses but to accelerate the process. Then it's on to Guy Standing who has conducted basic income experiments in India and Namibia (pdf) and is trying to get one off the ground in Groningen (Utrecht apparently is also a go). Finally, a stop in Alaska to ask some of its residents about their views on the state-owned Permanent Fund. This last part brings to mind the question: just what is wealth anyway? [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jul 2, 2015 - 7 comments

Why do busses bunch?

Why do busses always seem to bunch together? It's because they actually do. Finally, there's a web game to help you understand why. More intellectually stimulating than Desert Bus, but not much more gameplay. CityLab has more.
posted by entropone on May 21, 2015 - 48 comments

Night of 100,000 Stars

100,000 Stars is an interactive visualization of the stellar neighborhood created for the Google Chrome web browser. It shows the real location of over 100,000 nearby stars. Zooming in reveals 87 major named stars and our solar system. The galaxy view is an artist's rendition." --Chrome Experiments via Quartz
Disambiguation:
posted by Stoatfarm on May 11, 2015 - 9 comments

China announces it is scoring its citizens using big data

China rates its own citizens - including online behaviour: "The Chinese government is currently implementing a nationwide electronic system, called the Social Credit System, attributing to each of its 1,3 billion citizens a score for his or her behavior. The system will be based on various criteria, ranging from financial credibility and criminal record to social media behavior. From 2020 onwards each adult citizen should, besides his identity card, have such a credit code." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on May 5, 2015 - 77 comments

Then, a sky, an urban, and an empty. Here, the sky is for fly in.

word.camera generates paragraphs from a photograph. Example: photo of Hillary Clinton. A more detailed explanation at MetaFilter Projects; from Mefi's own TheMadStork.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Apr 27, 2015 - 45 comments

Slow, Beautiful Data

Dear Data. A post card project of analog data visualizations.
posted by JanetLand on Apr 10, 2015 - 3 comments

The Heart of the Matter

Patients should be allowed to access data generated by implanted devices. After losing his health insurance, Hugo Campos has written an article detailing his frustrations with self-care: "I can’t access the data generated by my implanted defibrillator. That’s absurd."
posted by domo on Mar 24, 2015 - 48 comments

"a tomb in miniature for our souls”

The death of writing – if James Joyce were alive today he’d be working for Google: [Guardian Books]
There’s hardly an instant of our lives that isn’t electronically documented. These days, it is software that maps our new experiences, our values and beliefs. How should a writer respond? Tom McCarthy on fiction in the age of data saturation.

posted by Fizz on Mar 7, 2015 - 11 comments

LA's cultural and historical legacy: more than being able to turn right at a red light

HistoricPlacesLA is the first online information and management system specifically created to inventory, map, and help protect the City of Los Angeles' significant historic resources. It showcases the city's diversity of historic resources, including architecturally significant buildings and places of social importance as well as historic districts, bridges, parks, and streetscapes. You can search for specifics or try some popular seaches, and the map view let's you combine different overlays and base maps.
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 28, 2015 - 6 comments

Inside Amsterdam's efforts to become a smart city

Amsterdam wants to be smarter than you. And it’s well on its way. The Netherlands capital is on a mission to turn itself into the smartest city in the world. Through a collaboration with government officials, private companies including telecom giant KPN, and the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, the city is quickly becoming a futuristic tech hub.
posted by ellieBOA on Jan 25, 2015 - 14 comments

Don't Try Too Hard to Please Twitter

The NYT Social Media team pulls the curtain back on how Twitter works for them with detailed examples of how changing text and descriptions and focus in their short messages resonated with readers, and which fell flat. Really interesting bit of transparency on their process, and results.
posted by mathowie on Jan 22, 2015 - 26 comments

Additive-noise methods

How to tell correlation from causation - "The basic intuition behind the method demonstrated by Prof. Joris Mooij of the University of Amsterdam and his co-authors is surprisingly simple: if one event influences another, then the random noise in the causing event will be reflected in the affected event."
posted by kliuless on Jan 12, 2015 - 25 comments

A researcher, a data journalist, and a designer walk into a bar.

The good people at Information Is Beautiful took the data from the "75+ classic cocktail recipes from the International Bartender’s Association’s list of drinks every bartender should know" and turned into into a beautiful reference chart. As an added bonus, they converted the ingredients to proportions for easy scaling. Cheers!
posted by Room 641-A on Jan 10, 2015 - 63 comments

The OED in two minutes

The OED in two minutes is a visualisation of the change and growth of the English language since 1150, showing the frequency and origin of new words year by year. Notes and explanations about the project. [more inside]
posted by dng on Jan 8, 2015 - 18 comments

We ran into a data set and there we got upshot

Flowing Data's kind-of annual entry into the "best of" season: Their picks for best data visualisations of 2014. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Dec 22, 2014 - 2 comments

((n - (r - 1)) ÷ n) × w

Best Ever Albums aggregates 17,000 "greatest album" charts to establish a statistical consensus on popular music rankings. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Dec 17, 2014 - 73 comments

Where form follows data.

Amsterdam City Dashboard: a City as Urban Statistics
posted by infini on Dec 15, 2014 - 8 comments

Face the face

"Facebook actually makes masks out of everyone’s faces." Artist Sterling Crispin creates DATA-MASKS as a way to physically present the abstract data structures that Facebook and biometric surveillance systems use to pull a face from a crowd.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Dec 2, 2014 - 10 comments

The joy of being unbalanced

Common sense dictates that video games should be balanced. Of course they should be! Why wouldn't they? Well, it turns out there are actually some pretty cool things that can happen when a game isn't balanced. - The Unbalanced Design of Super Smash Brothers
posted by stoneweaver on Nov 20, 2014 - 62 comments

(Info?) --> [Y] --> (Beautiful?) --> [Y] --> (Most?) --> [Y] --> /WIN/

The Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards 2014 celebrate excellence and beauty in data visualizations, infographics and information art.
posted by Room 641-A on Nov 15, 2014 - 14 comments

Pianogram

Pianogram - histogram + piano notes = pianogram; select from existing pieces or import your MIDI file. A part of Joey's Visual Playground.
posted by a lungful of dragon on Nov 15, 2014 - 11 comments

Research methods: the heart and soul of knowledge

Hollaback and Why Everyone Needs Better Research Methods (And Why All Data Needs Theory), by Zeynep Tufekci:
I’ve taught "introduction to research methods" to undergraduate students for many years, and they would sometimes ask me why they should care about all this "method stuff", besides having a required class for a sociology major out of the way. I would always tell them, without understanding research methods, you cannot understand how to judge what you see.

The Hollaback video shows us exactly why.
[more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 5, 2014 - 23 comments

Library Hack

Library Hack: the results of an open data competition [more inside]
posted by aniola on Oct 30, 2014 - 2 comments

Artists Report Back

What is a work of art in the age of $120,000 art degrees? A new report (PDF) by activist collective BFAMFAPhD laments the shrinking job prospects and growing debt burden for art school graduates. [more inside]
posted by overeducated_alligator on Oct 21, 2014 - 60 comments

Current record: 2:02:57

What Will It Take to Run a 2-Hour Marathon? (Warning: data viz, annoying design)
posted by gwint on Oct 12, 2014 - 22 comments

"Mess with the best, Die like the rest!"

JPMorgan Chase Says More Than 76 Million Accounts Compromised in Cyberattack [New York Times]
"The breach is among the largest corporate hacks, and the latest revelations vastly dwarf earlier estimates that hackers had gained access to roughly 1 million customer accounts."

posted by Fizz on Oct 2, 2014 - 122 comments

You won't believe the data on this Star Trek: TNG character!

Search for word usage in movies and television over time.
Movies and television shows often reflect cultural trends of the time they are made in. Even movies that take place during the past or future can say something about the present through metadata or production style. Using the Bookworm platform, Benjamin Schmidt, an assistant professor of history at Northeastern University, provides a tool that lets you see trends in movie and television dialogue.

posted by Room 641-A on Sep 17, 2014 - 40 comments

(watch very closely for removal of this title)

Radical Librarianship: how ninja librarians are ensuring patrons' electronic privacy [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 15, 2014 - 38 comments

Beauty itself doth of itself persuade The eyes of men without an orator.

Folger Shakespeare Library Releases 80,000 Images for Creative Common Use. The Folger Shakespeare Library announced yesterday, that they have released the contents of their Digital Image Collection under a Creative Commons Share-Alike (CC-BY-SA) license. Full database can be accessed here.
posted by Fizz on Aug 13, 2014 - 18 comments

India's data portal

data.gov.in : the Indian counterpart of the US data.gov, features 10280 resources in 3215 catalogs for public perusal. There's a visualization gallery charting developments like village electrification or domestic air traffic or sales of automobiles. And also a community section featuring apps offering mobile access to some of the data.
posted by Gyan on Aug 7, 2014 - 2 comments

The singularity of academic geek clickers

You are a particle physics researcher. Particle Clicker is a resource accumulation game in the same mould as Cookie Clicker - but this time with particle physics research, academics, and funding. Click repeatedly on the Collider to generate data. Turn data into research to gain funding and increase your reputation. Spend your funding on Human Resources and Upgrades - don't forget to buy beer to keep your research students happy, and coffee to keep them awake! [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Aug 7, 2014 - 33 comments

Everyone loves infographics!

A link to Good Magazine's infographics. Some of my favorites: How powerful is your passport, Being bike friendly in America, What foods are most susceptible to food fraud. [more inside]
posted by Kitteh on Jul 31, 2014 - 19 comments

I Know Where Your Cat Lives

Only 15 million, riiiight. A data experiment out of Florida State University maps the location of 1 million of the 15 million publicly available online images tagged with the word "cat." Using a supercomputer and the map coordinates imbedded in their metadata, I Know Where Your Cat Lives shows where each image was taken, to within an estimated 7.8 meters accuracy. [more inside]
posted by gottabefunky on Jul 22, 2014 - 72 comments

A Life In Bits

For the past 105 days, I've been tracking everything about myself.” Anand Sharma shows the progress of his life through a beautifully designed site. [more inside]
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Jul 12, 2014 - 25 comments

Classic Rock Peaked (By Song Plays) in 1973

Why Classic Rock (Radio) Isn't What It Used to Be (SL538)
posted by box on Jul 7, 2014 - 148 comments

Mapping Census Data

Datashine: Census is a site from UCLs Big Open Data: Mining and Synthesis project which provides an easy interface to map UK population data. [more inside]
posted by Just this guy, y'know on Jul 3, 2014 - 2 comments

How to write 225 words per minute

How to write 225 words per minute. With a pen. Dennis Hollier, in the Atlantic, writes about Gregg shorthand, a piece of analog data-compression technology now largely forgotten and probably forever unequalled.
posted by escabeche on Jun 25, 2014 - 54 comments

Journey to the Centre of Google Earth

“But what shall we dream of when everything becomes visible?” Virilio replies: “We’ll dream of being blind."
posted by 0bvious on Jun 24, 2014 - 5 comments

Today in Geographic Microdata

Clarity Campaign Labs invites you to use TargetSmart U.S. voter data to discover, via seven yes/no/don't care questions, What town matches my politics? Business Insider uses it to determine the most liberal and conservative towns in each state.
posted by psoas on Jun 19, 2014 - 87 comments

The T in February, backwards and forwards.

An interactive visualization of Boston's subway system in February. With it, you can see where trains on the red, blue, and orange lines were at any moment on February 3 were in space and along their paths between stations, among many other things. [more inside]
posted by ignignokt on Jun 10, 2014 - 29 comments

I get my kicks above the waistline, sunshine

Randy Olson is conducting an analysis of chess since 1850. What's the advantage of playing white? Are games getting longer? What openings have fallen in and out of vogue? Are chess players becoming less focused on capturing pieces?
posted by Chrysostom on May 29, 2014 - 26 comments

Through the currents

The SmartMime whale tracker lets you know where Hawaii's diverse population of whales are right now (not actually in real time, but based on migration data).
posted by Potomac Avenue on May 18, 2014 - 8 comments

Presenting Data

A checklist for those making graphs from Stephanie Evergreen and Ann Emery. This is a useful tool for teaching scientists and others some of the rules of data presentation in graph form.
posted by sciencegeek on May 16, 2014 - 23 comments

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