Join 3,418 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

6 posts tagged with data and graphs. (View popular tags)
Displaying 1 through 6 of 6. Subscribe:

Science is beautiful...

In a new exhibition titled Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight, the British Library pays homage to the important role data visualization plays in the scientific process. The exhibition can be visited from 20 February until 26 May 2014, and contains works ranging from John Snow's plotting of the 1854 London cholera infections on a map to colourful depictions of the Tree of Life. In a Nature Video, curator Johanna Kieniewicz explores some of the beautiful examples of visualizations that are exhibited.
[more inside]
posted by infini on Mar 3, 2014 - 1 comment

That's when you started graphing everything.

The 15 Best Behavioural Science Graphs of 2010-13. [more inside]
posted by aka burlap on Dec 21, 2013 - 4 comments

The Daily Viz

Matt Stiles is a data journalist for NPR. He tries each day to create a data visualization, or post those he finds online. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Mar 12, 2013 - 21 comments

Ben Greenman’s Museum of Silly Charts

Ben Greenman’s Museum of Silly Charts.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on May 12, 2011 - 14 comments

Lies, damned lies, and graphs

Graph your life at MIT's Mycrocosm. Simple interface. Interesting potential. Worrying about. Freelance: No Idea What the Hell Is Going On. Food and Liquid Consumption. Also allows for sharing datasets with other users.
posted by artifarce on Sep 8, 2008 - 10 comments

Ooh, look at all the pretty data.

Stream graphs, or stacked graphs, are a new form of (sometimes interactive) visualization that present data in a fluid timescale format. For example, the NY Times website has a graph showing the box office receipts from 1996-2008. There's a Twitter streamgraph based on keywords. Here's one of all the musicians a Last.fm user has listened to over time. Track the popularity of baby names back to the 1880s. Possibly the most striking, if not necessarily intuitive, is this visualization of US population by county, 1790-2000. There's already an academic study of the technique.
posted by desjardins on Jul 31, 2008 - 27 comments

Page: 1