Join 3,369 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

6 posts tagged with death by matteo.
Displaying 1 through 6 of 6.

Related tags:
+ (97)
+ (69)
+ (52)
+ (47)
+ (40)
+ (39)
+ (36)
+ (34)
+ (31)
+ (31)
+ (29)
+ (29)
+ (27)
+ (26)
+ (25)
+ (25)
+ (25)
+ (21)
+ (21)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (17)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)


Users that often use this tag:
zarq (30)
homunculus (17)
amberglow (16)
madamjujujive (10)
mr_crash_davis (10)
Fizz (10)
grapefruitmoon (8)
reenum (8)
y2karl (7)
the man of twists ... (7)
Brandon Blatcher (6)
kliuless (6)
matteo (6)
Artw (6)
semmi (5)
mathowie (5)
ColdChef (5)
hadjiboy (5)
Joe Beese (5)
Mezentian (5)
jonson (4)
anastasiav (4)
Chrysostom (4)
tomcosgrave (4)
stbalbach (4)
bwg (4)
tellurian (4)
miss lynnster (4)
Blazecock Pileon (4)
Astro Zombie (4)
flapjax at midnite (4)
Potomac Avenue (4)
hat_eater (4)
maudlin (3)
waxpancake (3)
skallas (3)
thisisdrew (3)
drezdn (3)
MiguelCardoso (3)
Postroad (3)
MegoSteve (3)
swift (3)
hortense (3)
Kattullus (3)
OmieWise (3)
divabat (3)
jason's_planet (3)
amyms (3)
l33tpolicywonk (3)
Legomancer (3)
Madamina (3)
Henry C. Mabuse (3)
Lutoslawski (3)
ocherdraco (3)
The Whelk (3)
fight or flight (3)
Trurl (3)
adamvasco (2)
spock (2)
Sticherbeast (2)

"Everything is foggy. Everything is not clear. He was alive when we got to the other side. And now I have brought him back dead. Whatever hopes we had, that's where they ended."
The Summer of the Death of Hilario Guzman (BugMeNot)
posted by matteo on Sep 3, 2006 - 13 comments

"I felt that something unusual was happening, that I had never heard the piano played like this."

"The sound was not of this world, it hovered in space like some celestial blessing".
He could play the piano ”before he had learned to smile”, his mother said, and he gave his first concert at the age of six. He studied under Alfred Cortot, Charles Munch, Paul Dukas, and Nadia Boulanger. He was an esteemed teacher and critic at 19, an international phenomenon at 24. He escaped from his native Rumania to Switzerland in 1943 with his fiancée, a joint capital of five Swiss francs in their pockets. After the war, just as he had arrived in the pantheon of great performing artists, Dinu Lipatti was diagnosed with leukemia. In September 1950, near death, despite the urgings of his doctors Lipatti insisted upon one last recital at Besançon. As his wife recalled, this was the only way Lipatti could bear to take his leave of the world. Lipatti was so weak he could barely walk to the piano. But once he began playing, he became transformed. After performing 13 waltzes, he could no longer muster the strength necessary to perform the final selection. So he substituted Myra Hess's piano arrangement of Bach's 'Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring".(page with sound). Three months later, Lipatti died at the age of 33. After Lipatti's funeral, his old mentor Cortot wrote: "There was nothing to teach you. One could, in fact, only learn from you."
posted by matteo on May 20, 2006 - 15 comments

"To all our sisters who have committed suicide or who have been institutionalized for their rebellion."

"To all our sisters who have committed suicide or who have been institutionalized for their rebellion."
Throughout her career, but especially in her latest and most wrenching work— Sisters, Saints, & Sibyls, the 39-minute three-screen lamentation that is a duel memoir of her sister's suicide at the age of 19 and her own mortifications of the flesh and battles with addiction—the photographer Nan Goldin has been one of the great living suicides of recent art history... Charles Baxter wrote that novelist Malcolm Lowry captured "the way things radiate just before they turn to ash." At her best Goldin does this too.
posted by matteo on Apr 7, 2006 - 10 comments

“a little in love with death”

Forty-nine published plays. Four Pulitzer Prizes. Three marriages. A suicide attempt. A celebrity for a father. A drug-addicted mother who blamed her habit on her son. A daughter estranged, a son who committed suicide. A Nobel Prize, the only ever awarded to an American playwright.
Eugene O'Neill from inside out: a documentary film for American Experience. More inside.
posted by matteo on Mar 30, 2006 - 16 comments

Noel Mewton-Wood (1922-53)

After a Noel Mewton-Wood performance of Hindemith's (.pdf) Ludus Tonalis, Dame Myra Hess exclaimed: ‘The boy is truly remarkable, and what shall he be like at 40-odd?’. Glowing testimonials to his ‘genius’ (Sir Malcolm Sargent) from Beecham, Schnabel, Bliss, Hindemith and Britten were countered by indifference from the major record labels and concert managements. In 1953, at the age of 31, the pianist, a shy young man susceptible to depression, committed suicide. Now, the Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive of Middlesex University offers a scan of the The London Evening News page with the report of Mewton-Wood's death. And here is a mp3 page with some of his out-of-print work.
posted by matteo on Mar 24, 2006 - 11 comments

Italo Calvino, 1923-1985

"If time has to end, it can be described, instant by instant," Mr. Palomar thinks, "and each instant, when described, expands so that its end can no longer be seen." He decides that he will set himself to describing every instant of his life, and until he has described them all he will no longer think of being dead. At that moment he dies.
In memoriam of Italo Calvino, who died exactly 20 years ago.
"Calvino's novels" by his friend Gore Vidal. Calvino's obituary by Vidal, il maestro William Weaver's essay on Calvino's cities, Jeanette Winterson on Calvino's dream of being invisible, and Stefano Franchi's philosophical study on Palomar's doctrine of the void. More inside.
posted by matteo on Sep 18, 2005 - 18 comments

Page: 1