154 posts tagged with disability.
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"He thinks the wheelchair is ridiculous."

Duncan Lou Who is a boxer puppy with a difference. Here's more about him. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Sep 7, 2016 - 10 comments

"Truth is, we’ve been here all along"

Amid a potential financial disaster and accessibility problems, on Wednesday, September 7, the 15th Summer Paralympic Games will begin in Rio de Janeiro. The Rome 1960 Paralympic Games included only eight events. At Rio 2016, athletes will compete in 23 scheduled sports. A list of broadcasters by country is available here. Some sports only have one classification, while others have several... [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Sep 5, 2016 - 13 comments

"I encourage ESPYs to…change the category to Best Adaptive Athlete"

Bethany Hamilton: surfing with only one arm isn't as hard as beating the stigma (Guardian)

In Bethany Hamilton’s mind, winning the ESPY award for best female athlete with a disability would have been like “rewinding back to square one”—square one being the fateful day 13 years ago when she was attacked by a 14ft tiger shark and lost her left arm.

Which is why, this year, she withdrew her name from consideration.
[more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Aug 25, 2016 - 4 comments

Becoming Disabled

Rosemarie Garland-Thomson writes for the New York Times: "Disability is everywhere once you start noticing it. A simple awareness of who we are sharing our public spaces with can be revelatory. Wheelchair users or people with walkers, hearing aids, canes, service animals, prosthetic limbs or breathing devices may seem to appear out of nowhere, when they were in fact there all the time."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 19, 2016 - 24 comments

The sound of one hand saxing

Neill Duncan is a jazz saxophone player who lost an arm in 2012. He now plays a saxophone designed for one-handed players by Maarten Visser. Two of Visser's designs for tenor and soprano saxophones won this year's One Handed Musical Instrument Trust instrument competition. But Duncan isn't the only player using one, Visser isn't the only one designing them, and saxophones aren't the only instruments adapted for one-handed players. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Aug 15, 2016 - 5 comments

The Curiously Oppresive Power of Positive Thinking

"People with disabilities routinely run into barriers that make realizing the life they want impossible. These barriers are not of our making and cannot be overcome by means of a positive attitude." A rumination on positve thinking, the myth of control and disability by Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg. [more inside]
posted by stoneweaver on Aug 9, 2016 - 71 comments

“This is a here for us to find us.”

The Deaf Poets Society is an online literary journal that publishes poetry, prose, cross-genre work, reviews of disability-focused books, interviews/miscellany, and art by writers and artists with disabilities. Founded in 2016, our mission is to provide a venue for disability literature and art, as well as to connect readers with established and emerging talent in the field. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 6, 2016 - 2 comments

10 Badass Disabled Women You Should Know About

"Disabled people deserve to know, from our school days, that we’re not just cases, diagnoses, or “not really disabled”; we’re part of a community with its own histories and triumphs. So to help you gain a better understanding of disability than “just ignore it,” here are ten disabled women whose names you should learn." - Carrie Wade
posted by stoneweaver on Aug 3, 2016 - 24 comments

Project Value

"As we enter complex discussion in Canada about doctor-assisted suicide, we worry that Canadians are only getting one side of the disability story – that death is a natural choice for these poor suffering disabled people. But this story doesn’t speak to the experiences of many with disabilities. This project seeks to explore a different perspective; to share stories and experiences that contradict the narrative that disability is a fate worse than death." [more inside]
posted by clawsoon on Jul 27, 2016 - 33 comments

"Because we too are people, with opinions and stuff."

The Disabled Life is a Tumblr by two Canadian sisters with comics that illustrate how everyday experiences impact people with a disability compared to their non-disabled counterparts. For example: they've heard them all before.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jul 14, 2016 - 7 comments

Shorter Human Mode

Users come in all shapes and sizes; some tall, some short, some seated. Since the user interacts in a room-scale VR space with a realistic approximation of their body, the physical dimensions of both the space and the user matter. Depending on the design of the space and the dimensions/limitations of that user, they may not be able to interact with the space in an ideal fashion, if at all.
Accessibility in VR: Head Height, first in a continuing series of articles.
posted by carsonb on Jul 11, 2016 - 8 comments

Autism, employment and tech

"Autism is seen like some sort of mental superpower where we can see math in the air. In my experience, this isn’t really the case." - Dispelling some myths about the autistic wunderkind programmer. Also: Why you might not want to get TOO excited about autism employment initiatives. Autism FAQ
posted by Artw on Jul 10, 2016 - 29 comments

"Thank you for making a doll like me!"

10-year-old Emma had never had a doll that looked like her, until A Step Ahead Prosthetics made her dream come true in the weepiest video (alternate YT link) you will watch today. [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee on Jun 5, 2016 - 30 comments

Article 3: All Players in a team’s line-up shall be visually impaired.

In Beep Baseball (length 4:48), there are two bases, the pitcher is with the hitting team, batters are allowed 4 strikes, and the ball beeps. Oh, and all of the hitters are visually impaired. [more inside]
posted by nicodine on May 26, 2016 - 2 comments

I'll rise up, and I'll do it a thousand times again

"Rise Up" (Inspiration Version): The emotional new music video from Grammy-nominated soul singer Andra Day was directed by M. Night Shyamalan. No ghosts or twist endings, just a love story. [more inside]
posted by nicebookrack on May 11, 2016 - 11 comments

I needed something more individual and complicated.

Tattoos and Disability: "I’m not myself without this body, and you know what? I like myself. I’m not supposed to, and getting here was scary and took a long time but now that I am, I don’t plan on leaving. [...] Putting this art on my body, setting it apart even further from others, made me realize that disability is nothing if not queer. Think broadly: curious, odd, different, outside of our norms. Disability will do that to your body, orientation be damned."
posted by stoneweaver on May 5, 2016 - 7 comments

Access Together

Access Together crowdsources accessibility information about businesses and other venues. The site is relatively new, and coverage outside of NYC is sparse, but contributing is easy.
posted by jedicus on Apr 20, 2016 - 1 comment

The positive and uplifting sounds and story of Black Coffee

Nkosinathi Maphumulo is a South African musician better known as Black Coffee. He has been devoted to making music since an early age, and even though he lost the use of his left arm in a car crash while growing up in a poor township, he has gone on to become a superstar in South African music. More than a marathon-session DJ (going so far as to DJ for 60 hours), he created a multimedia stadium show, where he played with a 24 piece orchestra and additional live percussion, keyboards and singers, who all spoke with love for the unique South African experience they created. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 7, 2016 - 5 comments

I Looked at my Body and Said Yes: where disability and style meet

I think I’d gotten it into my head that disability is always, on some level, supposed to feel bad. Like if I fought myself all the time, I was somehow doing it right. And then I got tired.[...] I didn’t want to do battle every time I got dressed anymore.
posted by stoneweaver on Feb 24, 2016 - 12 comments

The Present

The Present is a short animation by Jacob Frey, about a boy who would rather spend his time playing video games instead of discovering what's outside. One day his mom brings him a little surprise which makes it hard for him to concentrate on his games.
posted by monospace on Feb 15, 2016 - 21 comments

You're Gonna Carry That Weight

Like to apply for the position of the head of an organization dedicated to advocating for the disabled? Better not be disabled yourself. [more inside]
posted by Halloween Jack on Feb 8, 2016 - 16 comments

Living with microcephaly

Gwen Hartley's two daughters, now 9 and 14, were born with severe microcephaly. In the United States, microcephaly isn't unheard of but relatively rare with an estimated 25,000 diagnoses per year. But with many of us unfamiliar with the risks associated with the Zika virus, the Hartleys' blog gives a valuable look at how this plays out in a middle-class family in the American Midwest. [more inside]
posted by witchen on Feb 5, 2016 - 37 comments

And the minute she saw me, she was like, "Oh my God, I get to go home."

The state said a 19-year-old with an intellectual disability wasn’t equipped to look after her baby and whisked the newborn off to another family just after birth—a decision the mother was ready to fight. But how smart do you have to be to raise a child?
[more inside] posted by Etrigan on Jan 26, 2016 - 27 comments

"I don't want to be what's broken."

Jake Roper from Vsauce3 talks about the frustration of recovery, creativity, and limitations. [more inside]
posted by [insert clever name here] on Jan 15, 2016 - 4 comments

The boy had no magic except what other people hung on him.

What would have happened if Harry Potter had been a squib? How might the story of the books gone differently? Well. Perhaps Arabella Figg noticed something first.
posted by sciatrix on Jan 2, 2016 - 79 comments

Philosop-her

At Philosop-her, Meena Krishnamurthy invites women in philosophy to introduce themselves and their work. For example, Elizabeth Barnes, "Confessions of a Bitter Cripple": "I have sat in philosophy seminars where it was asserted that I should be left to die on a desert island ... I have been told that, while it isn't bad for me to exist, it would've been better if my mother could've had a non-disabled child instead ... And these things weren't said as the conclusions of careful, extended argument ... They were the kind of thing you skip over without pause because it's the uncontroversial part of your talk." [more inside]
posted by Wobbuffet on Dec 19, 2015 - 13 comments

Pistorius "was re-enacting one strand of his nation’s cruellest past."

"[If] his story were true – and even if it were not – the faceless intruder of his imagination had to have had a black face." Jacqueline Rose carefully disentangles the threads of gender, disability, and race (yes, race) in the Oscar Pistorius trial.
posted by Amberlyza on Dec 3, 2015 - 16 comments

5 Harmful Myths the Ethically Non-Monogamous Community Needs to Address

Awesome gender-queer Michon Neal address intersectionality and poly relationships. "There are some deeply ingrained myths about non-monogamy that actually exclude many people with varied experiences – especially those of us who have intersecting marginalized identities (minorities of minorities, as I like to call myself)."
posted by stoneweaver on Nov 13, 2015 - 7 comments

Show us off in public, in the light of day.

Stop Paying Lip Service to Diversity D'Arcee Charington Neal writes about dating while gay and visibly disabled.
posted by internet fraud detective squad, station number 9 on Nov 5, 2015 - 10 comments

The heroes of Mad Max and disability

Our hero, one of the few surviving, is someone like me. An individual who you’d think would be the first gone — not last surviving — due to physical disability. Here was a game presenting Max and saying "He survives." The subtle message, vital message that goes unsaid is the next part: "And so can you".
Tauriq Moosa at Polygon writes about representation of physical disability in the new Mad Max video game.
posted by Stacey on Sep 22, 2015 - 9 comments

Professor Refuses To Wear Device To Help Hearing-Impaired Student

For the second time, Memorial University professor Ranee Panjabi refuses to wear an FM transmitter that will allow a hearing-impaired student to hear her lectures. The student, history major William Sears, is forced to drop out of her History of Espionage course. Now Memorial University has discovered an agreement that it signed with Panjabi nearly 20 years ago that allows her to refuse to wear the transmitter on religious grounds.
posted by Amy NM on Sep 18, 2015 - 324 comments

Where Skateboarders and Wheelchair Users Have Common Ground

Sara Hendren talks at the Eyeo Festival about how she, as an artist, came to work at an engineering college. Hendren teaches at Olin College in Needham, MA and runs the site Abler, a site about "art, adaptive technologies and prosthetics, the future of human bodies in the built environment, and related ideas." Hendren's talk name-checks the artist Claire Pentecost, who has elaborated idea of the artist as "public amateur": the learner who is motivated by love or by personal attachment, and in this case, who consents to learn in public so that the very conditions of knowledge production can be interrogated. [via Text Patterns]
posted by Cash4Lead on Sep 16, 2015 - 2 comments

The Curb-Cut Effect

You probably haven't thought about curb cuts recently, but you've almost certainly used one. Curb cuts were originally introduced to benefit mobility impaired people in wheelchairs, but they're used by nearly everyone. This is an example of the curb cut effect: accommodations are often initially developed for disabled people but prove to make everyone's lives a little easier. The philosophy of inclusive design incorporates building accommodation for disabilities into products and architecture as a way to improve the product for everyone who might use it.
posted by sciatrix on Aug 11, 2015 - 60 comments

The promise and the peril of the exoskeleton.

"The tension, the promise, and the peril of the exoskeleton: It is great for some, but in the gusto for technological solutions, for stories that “inspire” and for devices that pull people into the “normal” world, people can lose sight of a future that could be much better. " Rose Eveleth at The Atlantic writes about exoskeletons and other forms of assistive technology for people with disabilities, the life-changing things they can do, and the possibility that they are blinding us to other ways to look at disability, accessibility, and infrastructure. This is part of Remaking the Bodies, a series on how science and technology are re-engineering the human body.
posted by Stacey on Aug 7, 2015 - 37 comments

Both children were punished for behavior related to their disabilities.

Yesterday, the ACLU filed a lawsuit in the Eastern District of Kentucky in the case S.R. v. Kenton County Sheriff's Office on behalf of two elementary school children, aged eight and nine, who were restrained in handcuffs because of behavior related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a history of trauma. Video footage (trigger warning) [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 4, 2015 - 39 comments

The Americans with Disabilities Act became law 25 years ago today

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law by George H.W. Bush on July 26, 1990. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Jul 26, 2015 - 18 comments

Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.

Jamaal Charles, star running back for the NFL's Kansas City Chiefs, offers an inspiring speech at the opening ceremony of the Special Olympics. He discusses the influence competing in the Special Olympics had on his own life as he struggled with a learning disability as a boy.
posted by Drinky Die on Jul 26, 2015 - 4 comments

"NEVER touch or move a wheelchair without permission."

Tips for first-time wheelchair pushers.
posted by MartinWisse on Jul 13, 2015 - 47 comments

"Her body is never a plot point. It is simply allowed to be."

I am just about the biggest advocate for “representation matters” there is, but as a white woman I never really felt it applied to me all that much. Watching Fury Road, I realized how wrong I was. I’ve been this way my entire life and I’ve never felt “handicapped.” I’m disabled, yes – there’s shit I just can’t do, but an invalid I am not. For the most part I’ve always approached life with a “figure out how to do it and just get it done” attitude; I am loathe to admit I can’t do anything and I never give up without exhausting all the possibilities available to me. Watching Fury Road, I felt like I was watching my own struggle brought to life (albeit in a very fantastical setting), and I don’t think I ever realized how truly profound that could be for me.
Laura Vaugh talks about her response to seeing a kick-ass woman with the same disability as her on the silver screen. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 30, 2015 - 82 comments

Being Disabled Means No Marriage Equality For Many People

Getting married means losing life saving services for many people with disabilities. "How do you tell a person to choose between having food to eat and getting married? How do you tell a person to choose between their medication or their therapy or their wheelchair or their program that helps them to be more independent and self-sufficient and getting married?"
posted by stoneweaver on Jun 29, 2015 - 51 comments

Dads are supposed to be heroes

Bob Moran ("BOB"), the political cartoonist for the Saturday and Sunday Telegraph (e.g., 1, 2, more) had an unexpected journey into fatherhood. A beautiful and touching animated memoir for Father's day.
posted by RedOrGreen on Jun 21, 2015 - 9 comments

And Holland Has Tulips

What It’s Like to Have Down Syndrome—and Care for a Sister With Disabilities While the initial focus was to portray Alyssa as just another member of her family, the project changed slightly when Carly began to lose neurological ability. Although Carly’s condition is still undiagnosed, Lois needed to continue to work in order to keep everyone under the same roof. As a result, Alyssa became one of Carly’s primary caregivers. [more inside]
posted by magstheaxe on Apr 25, 2015 - 9 comments

The Whole Helen Keller

Helen Keller's lesser known work as a lefty socialist: Helen Keller was famous for flourishing as a deaf and blind woman. She was well known for her work advocating for the physically disabled. As she discovered that those who are poor were more likely to be disabled, she began her journey towards a leftist, socialist ideology. Much of her political and social activism has been erased from history. This article offers a more complete look at her body of work. [more inside]
posted by batbat on Apr 5, 2015 - 31 comments

Canada announces new thalidomide compensation

Canada, long considered a "global outlier" on compensation for thalidomide survivors, has announced new lump sum compensation payments. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Mar 6, 2015 - 3 comments

"Why do you have that thing?"

A taste of the harassment and scrutiny experienced by one young disabled woman. [more inside]
posted by terretu on Mar 5, 2015 - 66 comments

Sex, Lives, and Disability

Most debates around sex and disabled people in the mainstream press mirror those of medical ethicists, by focusing on whether disabled people have the ‘right’ to pay for sex. But this is just one small part of the overall picture. Disabled academics and activists paint on a much larger canvas, writing about issues such as consent around mental capacity, the forced sterilisation of disabled people, the rights of disabled people in institutions to have sex and be free from sexual abuse, and the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) disabled people.
"Sex, Lives, and Disability", from Mosaic Science, covers a lot of ground on many issues relating to including history of disability rights movements, what role sex workers may play in the lives of some people with disabilities, barriers often faced by LGBT people with disabilities, rethinking definitions of sex, and consent when verbal consent may not be possible. In sidebar videos, journalist and disability activist Mik Scarlet tackles Ten Myths about Sex and Disability and Alternate Erogenous Zones. Mik also co-authors The Love Lounge, an advice column focusing on love, sex, and relationship advice for people with disabilities. (Links contain possibly nsfw images and video, depending on your workplace. Clicker beware.)
posted by Stacey on Mar 3, 2015 - 7 comments

Being Deaf in Prison

What rights can a Deaf person who has been incarcerated expect? The National Association of the Deaf has a list of rights that correctional facilities must issue to Deaf people. However, a three-part documentary series done by HEARD (Helping to Advance the Rights of the Deaf) in conjunction with Al Jeezera (originally aired in December 2013) reveals that the actual experiences of Deaf prisoners diverge vastly from that of what they are entitled on on paper (trailer). [more inside]
posted by Conspire on Mar 3, 2015 - 5 comments

A sudden urge overtakes her to help mankind.

Be My Eyes is an app which connects blind people needing assistance with a sighted person who can help them by providing a description of what they're seeing. You can be Amelie!
posted by kaibutsu on Jan 15, 2015 - 12 comments

First on the list: Cut the disabled people

On the first day of the new Congress, a Texas Republican is leading an effort to make deep cuts in Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) to take effect within about a year. Democrats appear to have little recourse due to the recent election results. Fraud in SSDI is not a major problem despite Republican claims and mythmaking by NPR and 60 Minutes. The inspector general found only about 0.4 percent of cases were approved by fraudulent judges. [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Jan 13, 2015 - 130 comments

"Because you are a superhero."

"How One Man's Trip to Toys 'R' Us Brought Mobility to Hundreds of Disabled Kids". Dr. Cole Galloway started the Go Baby Go project to provide inexpensive mobility to special needs children, offering them a fantastic new way to get around. [more inside]
posted by quin on Dec 23, 2014 - 10 comments

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