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350 posts tagged with europe.
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Twinings of London are relocating to Poland.

Twinings of London are relocating to Poland. Twinings, the quintessential British tea maker have traded from London since 1706, are hugely profitable and hold a Royal Warrant. The company was the first to blend Earl Grey in Britain during the premiership of Charles, 2nd Earl Grey. The relocation is being funded by a €10,000,000 grant from the European regional development fund (ERDF). Are UK taxpayers indirectly financing their own job losses? [more inside]
posted by Lanark on Nov 7, 2010 - 65 comments

La beauté est dans la rue

French general strike is going on. It's against a proposal by the French government to raise the normal retirement age for public pensions from 65 to 67 and early reduced pensions from age 60 to 62. All society is concerned. Voilà the manifestations of high-school students, so damn chic.
posted by - on Oct 23, 2010 - 89 comments

Water between the sheets

Sociologist Amy Schalet has done wonderful research comparing American and Dutch approaches to teen sexuality. (Blog commentary here) [more inside]
posted by knz on Oct 11, 2010 - 68 comments

Rendez-vous auf den Champs-Elysées

In 1957, the year of the Treaty of Rome, founding the European Economic Community and setting the aim of an "ever closer union", the national railway companies of West Germany, France, Switzerland, Italy and Holland (later joined by Belgium and Spain) launched the Trans Europ Express, a joint network of first-class-only international trains for business travellers. [more inside]
posted by Skeptic on Oct 10, 2010 - 14 comments

Europe, now in convenient digital format

Europeana, a portal that brings together digitized items from scores of museums and libraries from across the continent, has launched its first online exhibition, Art Nouveau. (Click on the object, then "View object in Europeana" for high-res images.) And be sure to check out the massive new exhibition Reading Europe at sister site The European Library.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Oct 4, 2010 - 7 comments

A Compendium of Obscure Things

Res Obscura is a blog by Ben Breen, a graduate student of early modern history, which styles itself "a compendium of obscure things." Indeed, even the asides are full of wonder, such as the one about Boy, the famous Royalist war poodle of the English Civil War, which is but a short addendum to a post about witches' familiars. Here are some of my favorite posts, Pirate Surgeon in Panama (and a related post about 18th Century Jamaica), vanished civilizations, asemic pseudo-Arabic and -Hebrew writing in Renaissance art, and a series of posts about the way the Chinese and Japanese understood the world outside Asia in the early modern period (Europeans as 'Other', Europeans as 'Other,' Redux and Early Chinese World Maps).
posted by Kattullus on Sep 30, 2010 - 16 comments

Welcome to the Evil Federated Empire of Europe

Europe according to... is a project to map stereotypes of European countries according to other countries and groups of people. [more inside]
posted by desjardins on Sep 22, 2010 - 57 comments

Auf wiedersehn, jet

On the 19th of October, a Deutsche Bahn ICE3 train will travel from Germany to London through the Channel Tunnel. [more inside]
posted by acb on Sep 20, 2010 - 60 comments

travel to cities in Europe

europe-cities is a beautifully organized, practical site for information about traveling to cities in Europe. All the information is in one place: info about specific cities, cuisine, history, overview information, weather, a variety of cultural interests from English Christmas Markets to Hungarian culture. And, best of all, finding the cheapest/best places to stay. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Aug 28, 2010 - 16 comments

Journeyman Pictures

Journeyman Pictures has uploaded nearly 4000 videos to YouTube. Many of these are trailers for the documentaries they sell, but they have also posted hundreds of full-length videos. Most are for short documentarie, but there are a lot of features too. It's somewhat daunting to explore, but the playlists are a good place to start, and so are the shows: Features, Shorts, News and Savouring Europe, a European travelogue series. Here's a few interesting ones: Gastronauts, about French culinary students working to make astronaut food more palatable, Demon Drummers, about student Kodo drummers, India's Free Lunch, about the effects of free school lunches on Indian society, The Twitter Revolution, about YouTube and Twitter's role in the 2009 Iranian uprising, Europe's Black Hole, about Transnistria, the breakaway region of Moldova, Small Town Boy, about a gay male carnival queen in a small town in England, The Vertigo of Lists, Umberto Eco talks about the ubiquity of lists in modern culture and Monsters from the Id, about scientists in the science fiction films of the Fifties.
posted by Kattullus on Aug 24, 2010 - 10 comments

Details, details, book me a train and don't bother me with the details

From London to St. Petersburg with the Man in Seat 61. Actor Kenneth Cranham travels with Mark Smith, creator of worldwide non-air travel resource website without equal Seat61.com (previously). [more inside]
posted by Happy Dave on Jul 21, 2010 - 24 comments

Nini and the European Dream

In Spain, almost everyone is ‘not in education or employment.’ It’s the end of the job for life [more inside]
posted by KokuRyu on Jul 17, 2010 - 92 comments

France denies citizenship to man who failed to assimilate into French society

A Moroccan man whose wife wears a veil has been denied citizenship on the basis that he has failed to assimilate into French society. [more inside]
posted by reenum on Jul 10, 2010 - 91 comments

White Sea Black Sea – travels on the Border

White Sea Black Sea – travels on the Border. [more inside]
posted by chunking express on Jul 6, 2010 - 5 comments

One Man Swiss Army Knife Army.

"Free Repair" is a project by Swiss artist Roland Roos, who traveled through Europe for over two years to repair broken, displaced or damaged things in the public space - without an assignment, but also without asking for permission. He documented his endeavor with photographs. (Coral Cached Link)
posted by starzero on Jul 5, 2010 - 25 comments

Star forts from above

Star forts from above (Google Maps links): Alba Iulia, Arad Fortress, Almeida, Bourtrange, Coevorden, Estremoz, Goryōkaku, Naarden, Neuf Brisach, Nicosia, Palmanova, Retranchement, Terezín, Willemstad. More.
posted by nthdegx on Jun 8, 2010 - 47 comments

Eurovisionary

The Eurovision Song Contest Grand Final airs tonight, 21:00 CET. A live stream can be found here. [more inside]
posted by PontifexPrimus on May 29, 2010 - 166 comments

mit blinkenlights - PLC installations across Europe

Achtung! Alles Turisten, Teknischen Und Nonteknischen Lookenpeepers! Relaxen Und Watschen Der Blinkenlichten!
  • Projekt PIWO (Poland): video
  • Mikontalo Lights (Finland): video
  • Schönherz Matrix (Hungary)
  • Project Blinkenlights (Germany, France, Canada...) (previously)

  • posted by zamboni on May 20, 2010 - 8 comments

    Redrawing the map, Economist-style

    The European map is outdated and illogical. Here's how it should look.
    posted by armage on Apr 29, 2010 - 45 comments

    Sharing is Caring

    Do you like free music, and a whole lot of it? You might want to check out netlabels.
    23seconds is a netlabel from Sweden, with music ranging from introspective but fun indietronica to brash electroclash to feel-good Gothenburg disco, all for free (as in beer.)
    But what's a real goldmine is their massive netlabel catalogue, with a listing of over 150 labels. Happy downloading! [more inside]
    posted by dunkadunc on Apr 28, 2010 - 18 comments

    Airspace Reboot

    "A visualisation of the northern European airspace returning to use after being closed due to volcanic ash." (SLV)
    posted by Taft on Apr 27, 2010 - 32 comments

    Faces of war. 1941-1945

    On the eve of the 65rd anniversary of the end of World War II, RIA Novosti presents images in memory of WWII heroes compiled from photographs taken by war correspondents in 1941-1945 Great Patriotic War against Nazi Germany. Ships trains planes and people
    posted by hortense on Apr 13, 2010 - 19 comments

    "Au Soleil (To The Sun)"

    "Au Soleil" is based on my memories of a cycling trip I undertook across Eastern Europe from Berlin to Istanbul. Vimeo video. A (surprisingly relaxing) short multimedia documentary, created using open source 3D animation software and a keen artistic eye. [more inside]
    posted by circular on Apr 3, 2010 - 7 comments

    Men's evil manners live in brass

    Medieval funerary effigies and brasses provide a valuable and fascinating look at the fashion, heraldry, and armor of the Middle Ages. [more inside]
    posted by Shohn on Feb 24, 2010 - 5 comments

    Race Riots in Calabria

    Italians cheer as police move African immigrants out of a small town in Calabria, following clashes in which immigrant farmworkers were shot at, severely beaten and run over. Rosarno is said to be a hotbed of the 'Ndrangheta, which controls the labour market of illegalized seasonal day labourers living in inhuman and desperate conditions. While the Pope urges Italy to respect migrants, leftist newspaper 'il manifesto' put this on the front page.
    posted by ts;dr on Jan 10, 2010 - 51 comments

    The Big Chill

    What Britain looks like without the Gulf Stream.
    posted by Artw on Jan 7, 2010 - 134 comments

    WWII American St. Nick

    Sometimes, the full meaning of a moment isn't realized until years later. Dick Brookins certainly had no idea what would come of that December day, back in 1944. Brookins and other members of the U.S. Army's 28th Infantry Division Signal Corps were in Wiltz, a small town in Luxembourg, just days before what would turn into the Battle of the Bulge. This U.S. soldier stood in for an absent Saint Nicholas... it was to change his life and help him find some meaning for the war in Europe. As it turns out, someone was filming that day when an Army jeep carried the American St. Nick through the streets giving treats to the local children. It brought him back 65 years later.
    posted by netbros on Dec 25, 2009 - 13 comments

    A Lost European Culture, Pulled From Obscurity

    The Lost World of Old Europe: the Danube Valley, 5000-3500 B.C.
    posted by homunculus on Dec 1, 2009 - 21 comments

    Herman! It's me, it's Cathy, I've come home, whoa-oh-oh-oh-oh, let me in at your position of Europe's first High Representative for Foreign Affairs.

    Europe finally has a president. And a foreign policy chief. [more inside]
    posted by creeky on Nov 20, 2009 - 91 comments

    The Economist: The World in 2010

    In 2010, Obama will have a miserable year, NATO may lose in Afghanistan, the UK gets a regime change, China needs to chill, India's factories will overtake its farms, Europe risks becoming an irrelevant museum, the stimulus will need an exit strategy, the G20 will see a challenge from the "G2", African football will unite Korea, conflict over natural resources will grow, Sarkozy will be unloved and unrivalled, the kids will come together to solve the world's problems (because their elders are unable), technology will grow ever more ubiquitous, we'll all charge our phones via USB, MBAs will be uncool, the Space Shuttle will be put to rest, and Somalia will be the worst country in the world. And so the Tens begin.

    The Economist: The World in 2010. [more inside]
    posted by goodnewsfortheinsane on Nov 14, 2009 - 60 comments

    Danish Dynamite

    The Guardian recently published a beautiful article about Danish Dynamite, the '80s Danish national soccer (football) squad. Rob Smyth and Lars Eriksen write about how the success and failure of the national team highlighted national traits that Denmark has. The writing about the matches is among the most inspired I have ever read. [more inside]
    posted by reenum on Nov 11, 2009 - 6 comments

    The Latvian Crisis

    Latvia's Tiger Economy Loses Its Bite: Less than a year after Latvia joined the E.U. in 2004, its growth rate topped all of Europe. As global stock markets overheated and competition for investment opportunities intensified, Scandinavian banks showered Latvia with cheap credit. Now, with the highest unemployment in Europe, and propped up by $10 billion in IMF loans, Latvia's economy struggles to stay afloat.
    posted by HP LaserJet P10006 on Nov 1, 2009 - 14 comments

    1989, revolution in Eastern Europe

    The BBC World Service has put together a special report on the 1989 revolutions in Eastern Europe (they also have a simpler portal). There is a wealth of material, including TV reports on key events from the BBC archives, interviews, a map timeline, a report on Catholicism's role in the 1989 revolutions, a first-hand report of what it was like to gather news in East Germany during that time and much more.
    posted by Kattullus on Oct 27, 2009 - 20 comments

    Nineteenth-century lithography, in America and elsewhere

    America on Stone: 19th Century American Lithographs is a browsable collection of lithographs on topics from advertising to uniforms. The viewer includes pan and zoom functions. (Harry T. Peters, who amassed this collection, was particularly interested in Currier & Ives.) Lithography became popular very quickly after its discovery at the end of the eighteenth century, rapidly finding its way into such commercial uses as sheet music covers. Needless to say, it also came in handy for far more exalted applications. (For previous MeFi adventures in lithography, try these posts.)
    posted by thomas j wise on Oct 16, 2009 - 5 comments

    *Slap!* Sir, I demand satisfaction

    Few things in history are as compelling as the duel. Refined and barbaric at the same time, this practice has had a checkered history. The rules of dueling were codified by the Irish in 1777 in the Code Duello (summarized here), which was codified at Clonmel Summer Assizes in 1777. As evidenced by these documents, dueling was in practice prior to the Irish rules being drafted. The procedure and philosophy behind duels is illustrated in this article. Dueling gained some traction in America in the 19th century, culminating in the famous Burr-Hamilton affair. There are many more resources to find out more here. For a list of famous duels, you can check out this list. Lest you think men were the only ones dueling, here are a few short anecdotes of women dueling. Reportedly, dueling is still legal in Paraguay, as long as both parties are registered blood donors.
    posted by reenum on Sep 15, 2009 - 17 comments

    More crime fiction than you can shake a dagger at

    Euro Crime offers a staggering amount of reviews, publishing news and other information on crime fiction written by european authors.
    posted by Dr Dracator on Sep 2, 2009 - 5 comments

    Medieval Gastronomy

    Medieval Gastronomy. Food, cooking and meals in the Middle Ages. [more inside]
    posted by Ljubljana on Aug 21, 2009 - 44 comments

    Recession over in France and Germany

    The economy is abjectly terrible, right? It's so bad that nowadays, a picture is only worth 200 words. On the other hand, the recession is over in Germany and France, and in the United States, the unemployment rate dropped just a smidgen last month. [more inside]
    posted by malapropist on Aug 13, 2009 - 39 comments

    Health Service Sociology

    An article of an american sociologist about being sick in Europe.
    posted by - on Jul 28, 2009 - 150 comments

    Davy Jones Locker

    The NAVIS project is a multilevel international database for ancient ships of Europe. The database has very detailed information and pictures of ships from the 2nd millenium BC to the 12th century AD (found whilst trying to answer this AskMe). [more inside]
    posted by tellurian on Jul 16, 2009 - 5 comments

    The Smiler

    Tony Blair wants to be president ...of Europe.
    posted by Artw on Jul 15, 2009 - 64 comments

    Ireland Passes Blasphemy Law

    Who asked for Ireland's blasphemy law? Ireland's sweeping new defamation law, passed in the Dáil on the 9th, "introduces a new crime of blasphemous libel." The creators of Father Ted want some clarification. And at their recent AGM, "...Atheist Ireland members voted to test the new law by publishing a blasphemous statement, deliberately designed to cause offence. The statement will be finalised in the coming days." Across the sea, comedian and co-author of Jerry Springer, the Opera Stewart Lee asks: "What's Wrong With Blasphemy?" [40 minute documentary] [more inside]
    posted by milquetoast on Jul 13, 2009 - 68 comments

    The Lithuanian Press Ban, 1864-1904

    From 1864 to 1904, the Russian Empire tried to quelch the nationalism of Lithuanians by ordering all Lithuanian texts to be printed with Cyrillic characters instead of in the Latin-derived Lithuanian or Polish alphabets. But they didn't count on the Knygnešiai - the Booksmugglers. [more inside]
    posted by mdonley on Jul 12, 2009 - 18 comments

    The Hohle Fels Venus

    Ancient Venus rewrites history books: Female figure was carved from a mammoth tusk 35,000 years ago. [Via]
    posted by homunculus on May 13, 2009 - 77 comments

    Wild Wonders of Europe nature photography

    Wild Wonders of Europe "wants to show that Europe really is not about just highways and cities. But today, many seem to know more about nature in Africa or in America, than in Europe, because that is what’s on TV. The European natural wonders are still very little known to the World. We want to change that." 58 nature photographers are working on the project, and there are 29 galleries representing 16 countries thus far, with more to come. [via]
    posted by cog_nate on Apr 17, 2009 - 14 comments

    Napoleonic Wars at the European Library

    To go, or not to go? that is the question;--/Whether 'tis better for my views to suffer/The ease and quiet of yon hated rival,/Or to take arms against the haughty people,/And by invading end them? The Napoleonic Wars, in word, image and map, at the European Library. [more inside]
    posted by OmieWise on Apr 14, 2009 - 7 comments

    Czech Surgical Castration for Sex Offenders - Good Idea?

    The Czech Republic offers surgical castration as a "voluntary" option to sex offenders, whose rate of recidivism in some studies then drops precipitously. Officials at the Council of Europe are outraged, calling the punishment "invasive, irreversible and mutilating." Atul Gawande noted 10 years ago that, despite his reservations, castration works - at least against a subclass of offenders: the pedophiles and sadists.
    posted by shivohum on Mar 14, 2009 - 86 comments

    World War II History Reference

    "With Germany arming at breakneck speed, England lost in a pacifist dream, France corrupt and torn by dissension, America remote and indifferent... do you not tremble for your children?" ― Winston Churchill, 1935. The World War II Database connects people, events, photographs, and other elements of history in relational db form to tell the story of the 20th century's 2nd great war.
    posted by netbros on Mar 13, 2009 - 13 comments

    "blue eyes that had seen Franz Josef in his glory at the Court Opera in 1908 close upon a view of rusty bed frames and cracked concrete walls."

    "Habsburg! A vile being, heir to an illustrious name, born to a fortune, to honours, to soldiers, to prestige, and who finished as the lowest of Montmartre pimps, living from the money of a poor and unstable girl whom he sent to commit his foul deeds in his place!"
    That was after this Polish scion of the most famous family in Europe and commander of a soi disant "Ukrainian Legion" failed to finagle the crown as a Socialist king of The Ukraine, and became instead a patron of the rent boys of Paris who "handled women by necessity and men for pleasure". And all that before he turned successively a Nazi sympathizer, a British spy, and finally came, for the first and last time, to Ukraine's capital Kiev as a victim of Stalin and the Twentieth Century.
    posted by orthogonality on Feb 7, 2009 - 24 comments

    ...the intrinsic vitality of the human organism.

    Human fat was supposed to alleviate rheumatism and arthritis, while a paste made from corpses was believed to help against contusions.... For some Protestants,... , it served as a sort of substitute for the Eucharist, or the tasting of the body of Christ in Holy Communion. Some monks even cooked "a marmalade of sorts" from the blood of the dead.
    . . . . The assumption was that all organisms have a predetermined life span. If a body died in an unnatural way, the remainder of that person's life could be harvested, as it were -- hence the preference for the executed.... In 1492, when Pope Innocent VIII was on his deathbed, his doctors bled three boys and had the pope drink their blood. The boys died, and so did the pope.
    When we read about Burundians and Tanzanians murdering albinos to make "medicine" of their victims, we should not forget that European Medical Cannabalism was an accepted practice as late as the 18th Century.
    posted by orthogonality on Feb 1, 2009 - 51 comments

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