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One and sadly done

12 excellent features from directors who never made another feature
posted by Artw on Dec 8, 2014 - 38 comments

"Trash has given us an appetite for art."

Pauline Kael (1919-2001) was a remarkable movie critic, the best ever (and certainly the most perceptive and exciting).
Trash, Art and the Movies
Marlon Brando: An American Hero
Raising Kane
Final Cut: Dreams and Disaster in the Making of “Heaven’s Gate” [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 7, 2014 - 20 comments

Andy, why are you making these films? It's easier to do than painting.

The Making of an Underground Film, originally broadcast on CBS News with Walter Cronkite on New Years' Eve 1965, begins with reporter Dave Dugan saying, "Not everyone digs underground movies, but those who do can dig 'em here." in front of the Bridge Theatre in New York City's Greenwich Village. An interview with avant-garde filmmaker and exhibitor Jonas Mekas then segues into footage of the making of Dirt by filmmaker/poet Piero Heliczer, as a pre-Nico incarnation of the Velvet Underground (with both Maureen Tucker and original percussionist Angus MacLise) plays silently in costume in the background. Other highlights include interviews with Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick, plus the uninterrupted airing of a Stan Brakhage film in tribute to poet Michael McClure.
posted by jonp72 on Dec 6, 2014 - 2 comments

Out of the Past (and Present)

Eric Rosenberg is a graphic designer that got his start twenty years ago helping to create the distinctive look of The Hudsucker Proxy. His website features some of his work over the years on films including Fight Club, The Truman Show, Almost Famous, Dreamgirls and a whole lot more.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Dec 6, 2014 - 6 comments

Gritty, not glossy: 70s films

"Why were American movies so much better in the 1970s than in the decades since — and most of the decades before? Simple. Our movies then were not as inhibited by censorship (self-imposed) as they were prior to the '60s.

"And they were not as obsessed with huge box office grosses and commercial values as they became afterward — following the stunning financial success of those two '70s superhits, 'Jaws' (1975) and 'Star Wars' (1977). Instead, during most of the '60s and '70s — liberated both by the collapse of the old studio system strictures and by the greater acceptance of film as art from critics and audiences — American filmmakers of all generations, from Martin Scorsese ('Mean Streets') and Hal Ashby ('Harold and Maude') to Sidney Lumet ('Dog Day Afternoon') and Mike Nichols ('Carnal Knowledge') to Alfred Hitchcock ('Frenzy') and Billy Wilder ('Avanti'), tried things they wouldn't have dared in the decades past. More often than not, they succeeded." (Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 5, 2014 - 285 comments

Neither Lost Nor Found: On the Trail of an Elusive Icon’s Rarest Film

"Screening rats and bootleg-swappers always have a holy grail. It sits at the top of a list of titles, on a folded sheet of notebook paper or in a Word document, bolded, underlined, or marked with a little squiggly star. ... These lists never get smaller; they only grow more obscure until they are filled with titles the list-maker has only a slim chance of ever seeing." Ignatiy Vishnevetsky [previously, previously] on rare movies, Jean-Luc Godard, and the life of the obsessive film fan.
posted by alexoscar on Dec 4, 2014 - 17 comments

1970S, CITY, FUTURA, HELVETICA

Typography in Alien. (Also, Moon and 2001: A Space Odyssey.)
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on Dec 2, 2014 - 35 comments

butts lol

Gene Kelly's Butt: A Tumblr Collection
posted by The Whelk on Nov 29, 2014 - 56 comments

"I'm alive and I know what it means to be Lakota."

"... I love the version of the Thanksgiving story in the movie Addams Family Values, because I get to see the Indians win." [SLGuardian]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 27, 2014 - 31 comments

Snow glows white on the mountain tonight, not a footprint to be seen

Frozen: One year later
posted by Artw on Nov 26, 2014 - 129 comments

Seven great movies expiring from Netflix on December 1st

"Every month, Netflix quietly clears its virtual shelves to prepare for the arrival of new offerings. There are roughly 80 movies expiring from Netflix Instant at the end of November. We've picked seven that we think you should make sure to watch before they’re no longer streaming – one for each night until Dec. 1." (Paste Magazine)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 24, 2014 - 86 comments

Kiwi tastes a golden nugget. It's delicious.

Nuggets, by Andreas Hykade, is a short animated film about addiction. [SLYT]
posted by Room 641-A on Nov 20, 2014 - 24 comments

"Plastics."

Legendary director Mike Nichols, who made an incredible debut nearly fifty years ago with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and then managed to follow that up with The Graduate, has died at the age of 83. Younger audiences may also know him for The Birdcage, the HBO miniseries Angels in America and his last film Charlie Wilson's War.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Nov 20, 2014 - 65 comments

Red rum reduxe

Red: A Kubrick Supercut from Rishi Kaneria
posted by a lungful of dragon on Nov 19, 2014 - 11 comments

Greil Marcus and Don DeLillo discuss Bob Dylan and Bucky Wunderlick

The following conversation took place in 2005 in front of an audience at the Telluride film festival in Colorado, after a screening of Martin Scorsese’s documentary, Bob Dylan: No Direction Home.
posted by Lorin on Nov 19, 2014 - 6 comments

Pelvic sorcery of the finest kind

What if Guardians of the Galaxy, had included more dancing beyond that of baby Groot?
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Nov 19, 2014 - 35 comments

Good Grief

For better or for worse, audiences will get the opportunity to see an all CGI Peanuts movie in 2015. The first trailer was released today and it looks... not bad. Producer Paul Feig has promised a minimum of modern touches. We'll all find out one year from now.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Nov 18, 2014 - 125 comments

“the human element was vital for this series”

“Best Before End”: Photographing Energy Drinks [The New Yorker] In “Best Before End,” Stephen Gill in processes film negatives in a variety of popular energy drinks. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Nov 17, 2014 - 3 comments

It's alive!

We knew Universal Studios was rebooting the classic monster movies into a new cinematic universe. So who's writing them? The "Monster Men," a collective of writers inspired by both the Pixar "brain trust" and the traditional tv writer's room. Among the writers on board: screenwriter/director Alex Kurtzman (Star Trek, Fringe); longtime Fast & Furious writer Chris Morgan; the creator and writer of the Fargo tv series, Noah Hawley; Prisoners screenwriter Aaron Guzikowski; and Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure and Men In Black screenwriter Ed Solomon. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Nov 14, 2014 - 76 comments

16 pianos and a whole lot of dada

The dadaist Ballet Mechanique (1924 video 16mins) was the only film written by Fernand Leger and had cinematography by Man Ray. (film wiki).
It starred Alice Prin better known as Kiki de Montparnasse ( Metafilter previously ) and was scored by the American composer George Antheil.
In 1940 Antheil met Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler better known as Hedy Lamarr at a dinner party in Hollywood and together they patented a secret communications system known as frequency hopping which they gave to the navy who ignored it until 1957.
( Previous and previouslier).
posted by adamvasco on Nov 13, 2014 - 5 comments

I am the light

Being a Cinematographer (Parody) (MLVimeo)
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Nov 13, 2014 - 8 comments

interview with filmmaker Laura Poitras

A nicely lengthy interview with documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras. Poitras was one of the key figures involved in the revealing of Edward Snowden as the NSA whistleblower; she has a film (Citizenfour) opening this week. Poitras discusses her role as a documentary filmmaker, as well as her unique perspectives on the War on Terror, NSA surveillance, her status as a high-profile dissenter, and being on the receiving end of government harrassment.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Nov 11, 2014 - 19 comments

If you love movies, then you'll love Perfect Shots

Perfect Shots
posted by gwint on Nov 10, 2014 - 6 comments

Fearsome Architect

Who designed the tricorder, the flip-top communicator, the Vulcan lute, the the Romulan Bird-of-Prey? Wah Chang. Who made the Gorn and the salt vampire from M-113? Who commissioned the first 500 tribbles? Wah Chang. Who made Tarantula take to the hills? Who built the prototype for the time machine and created a monster too terrible to show on television? Who animated dinosaurs and adorned Cleopatra? Wah Chang, Wah Chang, Wah Ming Chang. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Nov 5, 2014 - 20 comments

Those not so Despicable Minions

After laboring as second bananas in Despicable Me 1 and 2, the Minions are finally getting their own movie.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Nov 4, 2014 - 35 comments

This. Script. Sucks.

Max Landis, son of John Landis and screenwriter of Chronicle, has shared a 436 page screenplay that he wrote as a 20-year-old: Super Mario World. Via CHUD.
posted by brundlefly on Nov 1, 2014 - 36 comments

Visions of horror

The film that frightened me most - Guardian writers on their personal cinematic nightmares: Threads, Ringu, The Sixth Sense, The Blair Witch Project, The Shining, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Orphanage, Eden Lake, Watership Down, Psycho
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Nov 1, 2014 - 115 comments

Dr. Zissou or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Shark

Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic trailer in the style of Stanley Kubrick's The Shining
posted by a lungful of dragon on Oct 31, 2014 - 3 comments

A journey through the horror films of Ramsay brothers.

Disclaimer: The facts are taken from the journal "Taste, Taboo, Trash: The Story of Ramsay Brothers" by Kartik Nair. I personally declare that the journal is only used as a reference & no intentions copying the content for any benefits, it's only to spread the knowledge regarding the working ways of Ramsay brothers. [more inside]
posted by infini on Oct 31, 2014 - 2 comments

IN ANY CONVERSATION YOU ARE ALSO DEALING WITH AN EMOTIONAL TRUTH

Film Crit Hulk is back with a long essay about more-than-gamergate. Building off his previous ethical criticism (especially his multipart James Bond series) Film Crit Hulk gives us his opinions on "THE VOID OF THIS PARTICULAR HOUR". [more inside]
posted by Hypatia on Oct 30, 2014 - 78 comments

"I agreed to a scouted-out project!"

The Dissolve's "Movie of the Week" on this week leading to Halloween has been The Blair Witch Project, which it describes as "the most widely despised great horror movie". They discuss the legacy of the film fifteen years after its release and the future of the genre that it helped to create: found-footage horror. And where are the people who made it these days? Heather Donahue is growing pot. Josh Leonard is still acting (Michael C. Williams less so). And the directors Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sánchez seem to want to catch that same lightning in a bottle, but with very underwhelming results.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 30, 2014 - 90 comments

"I bind you, Hollywood, from doing harm"

Halloween is almost here which to me means one thing: overanalyzing horror flicks for any feminist undertones! ... [N]o season has better metaphors for misogynistic fears and powerful female sexuality than the scary movies that permeate almost every channel and film festival throughout October.
At Autostraddle, Nina suggests nine horror films she likes in the "Blossoming-Teenage-Girl-Becoming-A-Woman" sub-genre. She is far from alone in her search for interesting feminist themes in horror cinema and literature. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on Oct 29, 2014 - 42 comments

That's regulatory capture!

LEMONADE WAR: a short film starring Patton Oswalt, Taylor Buck, Mo Collins and Werner Herzog. View more films here from We The Economy: 20 Short Films You Can’t Afford to Miss.
posted by brundlefly on Oct 28, 2014 - 20 comments

Mayberry, Metropolis and Rigel VII

It was called a number of things in its fifty years of existence, but the RKO Forty Acres (which actually measured just over twenty-eight) was above all a prolific movie and television studio located in Culver City, California. It started off as a film studio during the silent era that continued prominent use in sound films including Gone With The Wind, The Magnificent Ambersons and King Kong. Later, it was widely used for television shows like Bonanza, The Adventures of Superman and, most prominently, The Andy Griffith Show. It even got used in a number of classic Star Trek episodes (and be sure to visit this site for some nice screen caps revealing Enterprise crew members walking around Mayberry). The RetroWeb has a very thorough history of the studio, complete with prodigious pictures.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 26, 2014 - 10 comments

Do you like vintage training/educational fims? Meet Jeff Quitney.

Jeff Quitney has curated hundreds and hundreds* of YouTube playlists with thousands and thousands of vintage educational, training and institutional films and documentaries. If you hate multi-link posts you can jump right in because the playlists aren't organized. In addition to including extensive background information and links to other resources in the video descriptions, he has restored or improved the video and audio in most of the films. Space, the military, and biology are well represented, but so are pets, food, and outdoor recreation and survival. Armchair travelers will be able to travel around the world, but you can also stay at home and watch cartoons. Travel back in time for the latest breaking newsreels, and add your own weather reports from vintage USAF meteorology films. And if you like women’s tennis, then you’ve just hit the motherlode.*I stopped counting at 480 [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 24, 2014 - 16 comments

"Because we're here, lad. Nobody else. Just us."

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the film Zulu, which depicts the Battle of Rorke's Drift (previously) in 1879. Here's a little history of the production, as well as ten things you may not know about the film and an argument that it's the best British war film ever made. Film Historian Sheldon Hall discusses the film's legacy, and Zulu leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi (who portrayed his own great grandfather in the film) reminisces about the shoot.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 23, 2014 - 51 comments

boo

13 classic scenes that explain how horror movies work.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on Oct 23, 2014 - 11 comments

And yet, I still haven't discovered what the heck "Snarf Farms" are.

Figuring out some of the more obscure references in an episode of MST3k is a labor of love for some devoted fans. The folks over at The Annotated MST3k (previously) have been at it for eleven years now and have 113 episodes completely annotated. But for those who prefer their annotations in real time, you're in luck. The official YouTube channel for the show has posted two completely annotated episodes (Mitchell and Manos - The Hands of Fate) for your viewing pleasure.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 21, 2014 - 39 comments

Do you think I should confess? To what? Committing masterpieces?

Ladies and gentleman, by way of introduction, this is a film about trickery, fraud, about lies. Tell it by the fireside or in a marketplace or in a movie, almost any story is almost certainly some kind of lie. But not this time. This is a promise. For the next hour, everything you hear from us is really true and based on solid fact.
Orson Welles' cinematic confidence scam, F for Fake, gets a new two disc Blu-Ray Criterion Collection release this year. Ben Sampson offers a visual analysis in two parts, breaking down the film's layers of paradoxes. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 21, 2014 - 25 comments

Vrooooom!

There Is No Better Use For Drones Than Star Wars Reenactments.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 17, 2014 - 12 comments

The Mother of All Supercuts

In Final Cut: Ladies and Gentleman (IMDb) Hungarian filmmaker György Pálfi creates a feature length love story by editing together clips from some 500 different movies. This "recycled film" was screened at the Cannes Film Festival in 2012. (SLYT, NSFW: This would probably be rated NC17; sexy-time scene with at least one clip from Deep Throat.)
posted by dgaicun on Oct 16, 2014 - 14 comments

The new trend in movies actually is new

Tired of movie sequels? Good news, The Sequel Is Dead -- The Universe Is Where It's At [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Oct 16, 2014 - 98 comments

It's like “Politically Incorrect”, but with less politics and more wine

In 2001, long before he helped launch the Marvel Cinematic Universe juggernaut, Jon Favreau could reasonably be described as “that guy in Swingers”. But sometime between Swingers and Iron Man, Favreau used some of his clout to create and host a new show for the Independent Film Channel. It was called "Dinner for Five". [more inside]
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 14, 2014 - 47 comments

Afrofuturism: The New Wave

A New Wave of Black Filmmaking: Experimental and Black Speculative Indie Films "A brief survey of the contemporary Black independent film scene yields a long and ever-growing list of experimental and Black speculative (including horror, Afrofuturism, sci-fi, fantasy, fan fiction) short cinema, film trailers, music videos and other projects. (/The Atlanta Black Star) [more inside]
posted by TheGoodBlood on Oct 12, 2014 - 4 comments

"The Empire Strikes Back Uncut" is a remake made up of fan-made films

"The evil lord Cat Vader, obsessed with finding young Skywalker, has dispatched thousands of remote minivan probes into the far reaches of the swimming pool... Ahem... Space."
In 2009, Casey Pugh asked Internet users to remake Star Wars into a fan film, 15 seconds at a time. In a few months time, thousands of fans responded with extraordinary creativity from around the world. Five years later, Star Wars Uncut (previously) was released. It was was such a success that in 2012 he solicited more fan-made films to create the next installment. A panel of 20 judges culled through over 1500 submission and more than 480 were chosen to create the shot-for-shot remake of the newest release, The Empire Strikes Back Uncut.

posted by Room 641-A on Oct 11, 2014 - 13 comments

Our home is beautiful and amazing.

"Using footage from NASA's Johnson Space Center, filmmaker Fede Castro creates a captivating time-lapse video of Earth from space. In a little over four minutes, 'Nuestra Tierra—Our Earth' takes us around the world, sighting major cities and even catching the breathtaking aurora borealis." More from Fede Castro.
posted by cwest on Oct 11, 2014 - 8 comments

"What do we say to the dead?"

On the fiftieth anniversary of its theatrical release, Slate is taking a look back at the Cold War thriller Fail Safe (trailer), which stars Henry Fonda as a U.S. President who has to deal with a computational accident that risks nuclear war. The film was preceded at the box office by Dr. Strangelove, a film very similar in plot but drastically different in tone. Fail Safe bombed as a result of the comparison with Kubrick's masterpiece, but the story itself would have a second chance at reaching audiences come the year 2000. [more inside]
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 7, 2014 - 54 comments

Because "there’s much more to Tetris than simply clearing lines."

Coming soon to a theater near you, it's Tetris! The Movie.
posted by hoodrich on Oct 6, 2014 - 60 comments

Cowspiracy is a documentary now being screened

Cowspiracy is a crowdfunded documentary now being screened that examines the environmental impact of animal agriculture and seeks to examine why prominent environmental groups have apparently not made it a focus of their efforts. David Robinson Simon, the author of Meatonomics who appears in the film, interviews filmmakers Kip Andersen and Keegan Kuhn. [more inside]
posted by Drinky Die on Oct 4, 2014 - 32 comments

Don't expect them all to be Casablanca

ComicsAlliance writer Benito Cereno has put together a collection of links to horror films available for streaming on Netflix this October: The Haunting of Netflix House 2: Your Sister is a Netflix
posted by almostmanda on Oct 3, 2014 - 35 comments

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