369 posts tagged with films.
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The 30 Weirdest Horror Movies of the 1970s

"The 1970s produced acclaimed horror films like The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Exorcist, Jaws, Carrie, and Halloween. But the decade also unleashed cinematic oddities galore, most of which were low-budget entries that gleefully pushed the boundaries of good taste. You say “cult movie”—we say “essential.”" (io9)
posted by valkane on Oct 22, 2016 - 52 comments

There is an excitement about having nightmares.

An artist named Christopher Shy has somehow managed to capture the swirling, amorphous feeling of a nightmare with his series of watercolor horror and sci-fi movie posters, and each is more terrifying than the last. For example: The Thing [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Oct 10, 2016 - 17 comments

The Haunting of Netflix House 4: The Netflix Master

Comics writer Benito Cereno gives his now traditional guide to "good, notable, or at least interesting horror and horror-adjacent movies available to stream on Netflix" in October *, the spookiest of months. [more inside]
posted by Artw on Sep 29, 2016 - 62 comments

"Let me ‘splain… no, there is too much. let me sum up."

Why The Princess Bride Is a Perfect Fantasy Movie. Discuss. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Sep 27, 2016 - 124 comments

You're going to hear some serious @#$%...

Audiobooks for the Damned (main site, previously) have been forging ahead in their quest to audiobook-ify film novelizations, and have finally released one of their holy grails - a seven-hour audiobook of George Gipe's legendarily insane novelization of Back to the Future Part I, as chronicled in Ryan North's B to the F (read it chronologically here, also previously). [more inside]
posted by BiggerJ on Sep 20, 2016 - 23 comments

"the ad indicated whether the A, B or C ending was playing..."

“[John Landis] thought it would be really great box office,” director Jonathan Lynn told BuzzFeed. “He thought that what would happen was that people, having enjoyed the film so much, would then go back and pay again and see the other endings.” Here’s The Odd Way Audiences Experienced ‘Clue’ 30 Years Ago (Andrew Husband, Uproxx) Previously: Mrs. White, in the marketing office, with a focus group
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 17, 2016 - 46 comments

Even the bad ones float

All 58 Stephen King Movie and TV Series Adaptations, Ranked
posted by Artw on Jul 29, 2016 - 53 comments

Skip to the End

Edgar Wright, director of the Three Flavours Cornetto film trilogy (made up of Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and The World's End) has shared his 1000 favorite films. The films are ordered chronologically starting with Robert Wiene’s 1920 film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and ending with...*spoilers, sweetie*.
posted by liquorice on Jul 29, 2016 - 40 comments

“But which is the biggest, dumbest object of them all?”

Big Dumb Objects: Science Fiction's Most Mysterious MacGuffins by Damien Walter [The Guardian] “When the unknown is also alien, the mystery only grows more magnetic. Think of that iconic opening to Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey: a family of apes wake one morning to find a black monolith looming over them; that had its origins in Arthur C Clarke’s short story The Sentinel. Did some super-advanced civilisation intercede in the early evolution of intelligent life on earth? Or was the monolith just filming a very special edition of Life on Earth? We don’t know, and never find out. But this shiny, looming thing is just one of many Big Dumb Objects [wiki] that have turned up in science fiction over the decades.”
posted by Fizz on Jul 22, 2016 - 50 comments

“The list doesn’t destroy culture; it creates it.”

Like These Books? Here Are 60+ Things You Might Also Like ... [NPR.org] Welcome to the second installment of Read, Watch, Binge! our summer recommendation series. As you may recall from last month's list [Like These Movies? Here Are 100+ Things You Might Also Like ...], we were tired of algorithms that only matched books to books or movies to movies. So this month, we've enlisted the help of real live humans to pair books with movies, musicals, TV, comics, podcasts and more.
posted by Fizz on Jul 21, 2016 - 8 comments

Ladies of the 1980s

Bitch Flicks offers a number of pop culture related essays (mostly film) from their recent website event, Ladies of the 1980s Theme Week. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 11, 2016 - 7 comments

sit back and relax

someone on imgur is making lists of Films You May Not Have Seen:
Actual Films You May Not Have Seen
Actual Films You May Not Have Seen (#2)
Actual Films You May Not Have Seen (#3)
Actual Films You May Not Have Seen (#4)
Films You Actually May Not Have Seen (#5)
Films You Actually May Not Have Seen (#6)
Films You Actually May Not Have Seen 7
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 25, 2016 - 70 comments

Thirty Million, a film about Bangladesh and climate change

Thirty Million (direct Vimeo link), a U.N.-funded half-hour film about the expected effects of climate change on the country of Bangladesh. Radio interview with one of the directors on Radio New Zealand. Bangladesh will lose 70% of its land area if there is a one-meter sea level rise, displacing thirty million people. [more inside]
posted by XMLicious on Jun 19, 2016 - 28 comments

Craig Baldwin: surf the wave of obsolescence, redeeming trash(ed) videos

Craig Baldwin creates "collage essay" films, redeeming or taking revenge on the trash(ed) videos of the past, and making movies on the cheap (YT interview). The work of this culture jammer, media appropriator, director and documentarian (Sonic Outlaws, Archive.org) stretches back to his short student films in the 1970s, and often includes political commentary, usually concerning the exploitation of countries and people under imperialism, capitalist or otherwise. But you might have to look beyond the chaos on the surface, as found in the ultimate conspiracy theory film, Tribulation 99: Alien Anomalies Under America (1991 - 48 minutes, Vimeo). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 24, 2016 - 14 comments

4 short links about a particular thematic structure

32 Short Films About Glenn Gould
22 Short Films About Springfield
10 Short Films About Wakko Warner
Several Thousand Short Films About Glenn Gould [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Mar 15, 2016 - 3 comments

120 Years of Film (MLYT)

Last year, it was 120 years since the Lumière brothers [previously: 1, 2] filmed workers leaving their factory. Here are various tributes to cinema. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Mar 14, 2016 - 4 comments

Cult classic

John Carpenter: analysing his style and growing influence
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 21, 2016 - 28 comments

Cinesift: find a film to watch

Cinesift: A movie database site that combines Rotten Tomatoes, IMDb, Letterboxd and Metacritic scores, with Netflix, Amazon Prime and DVD availability, to quickly help users find what to watch.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Feb 2, 2016 - 26 comments

DylanTube - All Videos: Live, Documentaries, Films, Ads,

DylanTube [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Jan 29, 2016 - 9 comments

The Luttrell Psalter Film

The Luttrell Psalter is a mid-14th century English illuminated manuscript containing a large number of illustrations of everyday life in medieval England. In 2008 the Psalter was adapted into a 20 minute short film for The Collection Museum in Lincoln, drawing on 35 scenes from the manuscript. There is also a blog describing the making of the film. [more inside]
posted by jedicus on Dec 21, 2015 - 4 comments

The 25 best horror movies since 2000 (according to AVClub)

"Ask horror-movie buffs to name their favorite decade for the genre, and you’ll likely receive a variety of answers. The ’30s had several of Universal’s classic roster of monsters. The ’40s had Val Lewton. The ’70s had zombies, and giant sharks, and Texas chain saw massacres. (The ’70s is a good choice.) But at the risk of speculating wildly, it seems safe to assume that not too many hypothetical fans would single out the current or previous decade as horror’s finest. Classics take time to solidify, reputations take a minute to build, and hindsight is 20/20. Plus, you know, Uwe Boll." [more inside]
posted by valkane on Oct 26, 2015 - 227 comments

Featuring a relative of LazyTown's Robbie Rotten! Because I mean COME ON

Herschell Gordon Lewis is best known for being a legend of gory schlock horror, but his resume also included two children's films. Of the two, the 'best worst' is the earlier by one year: Jimmy the Boy Wonder, featuring a low-budget Land-of-Oz-with-the-numbers-filed-off, a bizarre villain named Mr. Fig and a lengthy sequence of poorly-dubbed possibly-European animation. The other, The Magic Land of Mother Goose (aka Santa Visits the Magic Land of Mother Goose - guess who never appears in the film?), was the result of Lewis being hired to shoot a vehicle for a magician entirely on a high school stage. Both films are available for purchase from Something Weird Video (parts of site NSFW) as downloads and DVD-Rs.
posted by BiggerJ on Sep 2, 2015 - 4 comments

A "Wonderously Wonderful" Film with the "Strangest Cast[...] in History"

There exists a film whose trailer tantalizes the brain; a film whose English dub, believed to have been created by the notorious K. Gordon Murray (his previous lies - he is described as a "flim-flammer" who ran a "kiddie circuit"), has eluded even the most fervent afficionados of strange cinema. Thanks to the people of Sweden and a translator known only as Doctor Death (and fixes from uploader Justin Sane - you can see the translation by turning on captions), you can enter the world of The Secret of Magic Island: the live-action children's film starring an all-animal cast.
posted by BiggerJ on Aug 31, 2015 - 14 comments

100 great films by female directors

100 great films by female directors. Part 1: 1912-1953, Part 2: 1962-1975, Part 3: 1975-1981, Part 4: 1982-1991, Part 5: 1991-1997, Part 6: 1998-2001, Part 7: 2002-2009, Part 8: 2007-2009, Part 9: 2010-2012, Part 10: 2012-2014. (This is not "The" 100 Great Movies By Female Directors. It's merely 100 movies we love and honestly think you will too.) [more inside]
posted by dng on Aug 27, 2015 - 40 comments

Don't worry, you probably won't be secretly murdered if you watch this.

In 1991, a documentary, intended to be the first of a series on celebrity businessmen, was completed. It was screened twice, but its subject prevented its release and it was clear that continuing the series wasn't worth the trouble. So why has that film been released almost a quarter of a century later? Because that same businessman is now running for president. Trump: What's the Deal? (trailer, direct Vimeo link to full film, unofficial YouTube mirror)
posted by BiggerJ on Aug 2, 2015 - 75 comments

the malleability of memory: Pixar's "Inside Out"

"Inside Out does well when it comes to the interplay of memory and emotion, but the memory basics are a bit misleading." - Jennifer Talarico, Gizmodo
Science Of Sadness And Joy: 'Inside Out' Gets Childhood Emotions Right - NPR
8 Things Inside Out Teaches Viewers About Emotions, Memory and the Mind - Ashley Lee, Time
Inside Out Nails the Science of How Our Memories Function - Alice Robb, Vulture
See also: FanFare
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jun 24, 2015 - 55 comments


Mark Kermode reviews Entourage. [more inside]
posted by feelinglistless on Jun 20, 2015 - 32 comments

Its critics seem to not accurately describe the film in the first place.

In Defense of Sucker Punch: Phil Sandifer argues that Zach Snyder's universally panned 2011 exxxxxtravaganza has been criminally misunderstood and is more relevant than ever. (Zach Snyder provided his own perspective on the film to i09 at release.)
How Did This Get Made? and The Flophouse have assessed the film and generally agreed with the critical consensus. (Sandifer on the Blue previously, previouslier, previousliest)
posted by Going To Maine on May 8, 2015 - 118 comments

No way is Willy Wonka weirder than Anton Chigurh

Alex DeLarge, Anton Chigurh, and The Mystery Man walk into a bar. Get the fuck outta the bar. Movie villains, ranked on the weirdness scale. The Movie Bad Guys Weirdness Index "rates from 1 percent — a little bit weird, like when you pick up your phone to text someone and that person texts you right at that moment — to 100 percent weird. The only real restriction: No bad guys from horror movies were eligible because basically all of them are weird, so this thing would’ve been somewhere near 40,000 words." (SL Grantland)
posted by holborne on Apr 7, 2015 - 102 comments

Star Wars feat. The Joker and Bane

The Emperor Voiced by Mark Hamill's Joker * Darth Vader with Bane's Voice - Luke vs Vader * Mark Hamill's Emperor takes down Jar-Jar Binks
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jan 10, 2015 - 9 comments

"It revels in reminding you of the confined space you're in."

"[Director John] Moore is taking on what is, from a creative perspective, an awfully daunting task. What makes the Die Hard franchise practically tragic is that it's become so stupefyingly ordinary after bowing in 1988 as a remarkably taut, funny, exquisitely crafted action film that — but for the appearance of late-'80s computer and phone technology — has not aged a day. As explosively entertaining as it was the first time I saw it on the big screen 23 years ago, it was just as good two weeks ago..." MetaFilter's own Linda Holmes analyzes the original Die Hard movie, and the failure of a film franchise, on NPR's pop-culture and entertainment blog, Monkey See: Take THIS Under Advisement: Hey, 'Die Hard 5,' Don't Drag Down A Classic. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 23, 2014 - 39 comments

Gritty, not glossy: 70s films

"Why were American movies so much better in the 1970s than in the decades since — and most of the decades before? Simple. Our movies then were not as inhibited by censorship (self-imposed) as they were prior to the '60s.

"And they were not as obsessed with huge box office grosses and commercial values as they became afterward — following the stunning financial success of those two '70s superhits, 'Jaws' (1975) and 'Star Wars' (1977). Instead, during most of the '60s and '70s — liberated both by the collapse of the old studio system strictures and by the greater acceptance of film as art from critics and audiences — American filmmakers of all generations, from Martin Scorsese ('Mean Streets') and Hal Ashby ('Harold and Maude') to Sidney Lumet ('Dog Day Afternoon') and Mike Nichols ('Carnal Knowledge') to Alfred Hitchcock ('Frenzy') and Billy Wilder ('Avanti'), tried things they wouldn't have dared in the decades past. More often than not, they succeeded." (Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 5, 2014 - 285 comments

Seven great movies expiring from Netflix on December 1st

"Every month, Netflix quietly clears its virtual shelves to prepare for the arrival of new offerings. There are roughly 80 movies expiring from Netflix Instant at the end of November. We've picked seven that we think you should make sure to watch before they’re no longer streaming – one for each night until Dec. 1." (Paste Magazine)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 24, 2014 - 86 comments

Tenho que pegá-los todos!

There exists a trilogy of complete Portguese live-action Pokemon fanfilms. That is all. (Subtitles available, and not the automatically generated kind; click the Subtitles/CC button on the video's lower right.) Playlist links: The Mysterious Virus. Destiny of a Hero. The Light of Hope Part 1, Part 2. (MLYT) [more inside]
posted by BiggerJ on Nov 23, 2014 - 2 comments

Scroll through the horror movie memories

Why not just quit your job and spend all of your savings on a horror-themed road trip where you visit the real locations of some iconic scary movies. If that sounds like too much effort, well we've done a Google-based trip ourselves.
Here's what we found... [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 29, 2014 - 26 comments

"I bind you, Hollywood, from doing harm"

Halloween is almost here which to me means one thing: overanalyzing horror flicks for any feminist undertones! ... [N]o season has better metaphors for misogynistic fears and powerful female sexuality than the scary movies that permeate almost every channel and film festival throughout October.
At Autostraddle, Nina suggests nine horror films she likes in the "Blossoming-Teenage-Girl-Becoming-A-Woman" sub-genre. She is far from alone in her search for interesting feminist themes in horror cinema and literature. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on Oct 29, 2014 - 42 comments

Dream detected. Dream detected.

Kichwateli (Kenya, 2011; 07:46), The Day They Came (Nigeria, 2013; 03:59), The Tale of How (South Africa, 2006; 04:28; previously), Alive in Joburg (South Africa, 2006; 06:22; previously), Umkhungo (South Africa, 2010; 30:34; trailer alt. link), Evolve (Egypt, 2014; 24:17), Mwansa the Great (Zambia, 2011; 23:11; two trailers as alt. links), and Pumzi (Kenya, 2009; 21:51): eight short works of SF/fantasy via The Skiffy and Fanty Show.
posted by Monsieur Caution on Sep 30, 2014 - 1 comment

Not as simple as dumping a can of dog food, it turns out.

Back to the Future: The Opening Scene - Kevin Pike Interview - Part 1 (SLVimeo)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Sep 26, 2014 - 18 comments

Happy Rex Manning Day!

'Dance party USA teeny bopper' type of shit: Rex Manning, "Say No More, Mon Amour"
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Jul 15, 2014 - 36 comments

Let me tell you the story of Right Hand, Left Hand....

The movie was shot over nine weeks in Brooklyn, entirely on Stuyvesant Avenue between Quincy Street and Lexington Avenue.... [more inside]
posted by magstheaxe on Jun 20, 2014 - 19 comments

“They finally asked me not to come back anymore.”

"The Texas Chainsaw Massacre was the first real “slasher” film, and it changed many things—the ratings code of the Motion Picture Association of America, the national debate on violence, the Texas Film Commission, the horror genre—but it remained a curiously isolated phenomenon. The film itself, involving five young people on a twisted drive through the country, is a strange, shifting experience—early audiences were horrified; later audiences laughed; newcomers to the movie were inevitably stricken with a vaguely uneasy feeling, as though the movie might have actually been made by a maniac—but the story behind the film is even stranger." We begin with a couple of stolen barbecue chicken wings....
posted by zarq on Jun 19, 2014 - 51 comments

Brief film noir reviews: 290 and counting

Some guy has reviewed 290 film noir flicks and is still going.
posted by MoonOrb on Jun 11, 2014 - 15 comments

Shorthand for a long-gone era, groovy religion and journeys into space

Norman Greenbaum discusses the creation and ongoing popularity of 'Spirit in the Sky'
posted by paleyellowwithorange on May 30, 2014 - 50 comments

The view from the (far) left side of the balcony

What is it that the global pseudo-left in particular objects to about Lincoln and so values in Django Unchained?

This well-heeled social layer, conditioned by decades of academic anti-Marxism, identity politics and self-absorption, rejects the notion of progress, the appeal of reason, the ability to learn anything from history, the impact of ideas on the population, mass mobilizations and centralized force. It responds strongly to irrationality, mythologizing, the “carnivalesque,” petty bourgeois individualism, racialism, gender politics, vulgarity and social backwardness.

To such people, Lincoln is boring, staid and hagiographic, because it treats ideas and historical actors seriously and even admiringly. A film can hardly be degraded or “dark” enough today for these so-called radical commentators. The latter feel disdain for any expression of confidence in the best instincts and democratic sensibility of the American people, whom they view as always on the verge of forming a lynch mob.
The intellectually bankrupt defenders of Django Unchained and Zero Dark Thirty by David Walsh, longtime film critic for the World Socialist Web Site. [more inside]
posted by Atom Eyes on May 28, 2014 - 98 comments

The early film archive of Josef-Alexis Joye, Swiss Jesuit Abbot

Over a hundred years ago, a most impressive collection of early motion pictures was collected by the Swiss Jesuit abbot, Josef-Alexis Joye, who collected a trove of films as a way of educating children and adults. In total, he collected around 2,500 titles between 1902 or 1904 and 1915. The abbot's collection was not forgotten or lost after his death in 1919 -- it was stored and cataloged, though in danger of deteriorating by the 1940s. A few decades later, Italian film historian Davide Turconi, fearing that the films would be entirely through deterioration, decided to clip a few frames from each print and save something of the collection. Luckily, his fears were unfounded, and many the films were preserved in the 1970s by David Francis of the National Film and Television Archive of the British Film Institute, where approximately 1,200 of the nitrate prints still exist. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 28, 2014 - 6 comments

Being a superhero is awesome, everyone should try it

Captain America: The Winter Soldier is racing towards another blockbuster weekend and another hit for the Marvel cinematic universe. With future films planned out as far as 2028, can any other studio succeed in grabbing at Marvel's crown? And as the stars chafe at their multi-film contracts and grow tired of fame, waht next for Kevin Feige, the man behind Marvel's success?
posted by penguinliz on Apr 4, 2014 - 316 comments

Beneath our feet

Tiny Worlds: a series of films about tiny machines in the city like a tiny bulldozer, a tiny logging truck, and a tiny submarine.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Mar 21, 2014 - 8 comments

Delicious Delicious

"Liquid Sky is one of the most visually ambitious films ever made about fashion, heroin, New Wave clubs, UFO saucers, ordering Chinese food and having them put it on your tab, the Empire State Building, androgyny, neon and tin foil. The 1982 cult classic may be the perfect embodiment of camp. " The Awl talks to the director of the film about his plans for a sequel.
posted by The Whelk on Feb 20, 2014 - 46 comments

RIP Movies on celluloid 1895-2014

Paramount has ceased releasing films on 35mm film and will go forward distributing movies exclusively in digital formats. The LA Times' sources said that Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues was the last Paramount movie with a celluloid release, and Wolf of Wall Street was the first major motion picture to be distributed entirely digitally.
posted by Omon Ra on Jan 19, 2014 - 95 comments

Slight Future

Why Her Will Dominate UI Design Even More Than Minority Report
posted by Artw on Jan 13, 2014 - 223 comments

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