2 posts tagged with flickr by shakespeherian.
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GrafRank

GrafRank: Global Graffiti Statistics is a new webapp project from Jake Dobkin of Streetsy (previously). With GrafRank, Dobkin codes street art locations from the Streetsy Flickr Pool, tagged by artist, to highlight where notable street artists are working in specific cities, their prolificacy, and the more popular areas in those cities for tagging.
posted by shakespeherian on Mar 8, 2012 - 4 comments

 

A useful subset of the entire internet

On Wikipedia, Cultural Patrimony, and Historiography. "The Iraq War: A Historiography of Wikipedia Changelogs" is a twelve-volume set of all changes to the Wikipedia article on the Iraq War. The twelve volumes cover a five year period from December 2004 to November 2009, a total of 12,000 changes and almost 7,000 pages. The set is part of a project exploring history and historiography facilitated by the internet, and visualising information, opinion, narrative and discussion, by James Bridle.
posted by shakespeherian on Sep 7, 2010 - 38 comments

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