1778 posts tagged with food.
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Nugs, Ranked

Ryan Sutton at EATER asks the hard question: What are the best fast food chain chicken nuggets?
posted by The Whelk on Jan 17, 2017 - 121 comments

Blood Pancakes Are The Most Metal of All Flapjacks

On their own, blood pancakes end up being a savory dish, so many recipes call for enhancing the natural flavor by adding things like onions, spices, bread crumbs, and molasses. The only other body-fluid-specific requirement is to strain the blood to remove any clots that may have formed. Which really hammers home that you’re cooking with blood, in case you forgot. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jan 16, 2017 - 32 comments

On Food and Cooking and Science

Dinner with Harold McGee
posted by Lycaste on Jan 15, 2017 - 20 comments

"Preposterous and rococo cannibalism"

Slate reviews Bill Schutt's forthcoming book Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History. Guardian review here. Schutt is a Research Associate in Vertebrate Zoology and Mammalogy at the American Museum of Natural History. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Jan 13, 2017 - 15 comments

Garlic is as Good as Ten Mothers

An article about food documentaries wherein lies the treasure of the full length Les Blank classic. [more inside]
posted by mumimor on Jan 11, 2017 - 28 comments

Pairing strains

“I’m lucky to have a fairly high tolerance for cannabis, so I can consume in all forms without stringently measuring and know that I’ll still have the energy and articulation to host the show”. Bong Appetit, a cannabis-fueled culinary web-series in search of bold flavors, colorful characters, and truly "high"-end eating.
posted by growabrain on Jan 7, 2017 - 38 comments

“The nuts and bolts of getting everyone to buy in to this...”

Feed Your Kids Peanuts, Early and Often, New Guidelines Urge [The New York Times] “Peanuts are back on the menu. In a significant reversal from past advice, new national health guidelines call for parents to give their children foods containing peanuts early and often, starting when they’re infants, as a way to help avoid life-threatening peanut allergies. The new guidelines, issued by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [Full Text] on Thursday, recommend giving babies puréed food or finger food containing peanut powder or extract before they are 6 months old, and even earlier if a child is prone to allergies and doctors say it is safe to do so. One should never give a baby whole peanuts or peanut bits, experts say, because they can be a choking hazard. If broadly implemented, the new guidelines have the potential to dramatically lower the number of children who develop one of the most common and lethal food allergies, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the institute’s director, who called the new approach “game changing.””
posted by Fizz on Jan 6, 2017 - 81 comments

And the most American food is...

...Fluff?
posted by jacquilynne on Jan 4, 2017 - 153 comments

You don't get into this for the money because THERE IS NO F*&$ING MONEY

The American restaurant business is a bubble, and that bubble is bursting. I've arrived at this conclusion after spending a year traveling around the country and talking to chefs, restaurant owners, and other industry folk for this series. In part one, I talked about how the Good Food Revival Movement™ created colonies of similar, hip restaurants in cities all over the country. In the series' second story, I discussed how a shortage of cooks -- driven by a combination of the restaurant bubble, shifts in immigration, and a surge of millennials -- is permanently altering the way a restaurant's back of the house has to operate in order to survive. This, the final story, is simple: I want you to understand why America's Golden Age of Restaurants is coming to an end.
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey on Jan 4, 2017 - 124 comments

A feast of international Google food search trends

The Rhythm of Food is a collaboration between Google News Lab and Truth & Beauty. From the rise and fall of recipes over diets and drinks to cooking trends and regional cuisines. But it turns out that we can learn even more from analyzing search patterns. We collected weekly Google Trends data for hundreds of dishes and ingredients, over twelve years and plotted the results on a year clock to investigate the seasons and rhythm of food around the world. (There's tons more data if you keep digging down!)
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 31, 2016 - 5 comments

The diverse patchwork of Southern food styles is beginning to blur

The Surprisingly Recent Story of How Shrimp and Grits Won Over the South. This isn't a new article, but damn did it make me want some shrimp and grits.
posted by showbiz_liz on Dec 29, 2016 - 44 comments

6,944km, 17 restaurants, many stories

Chop Suey Nation (Globe & Mail) - Ann Hui
I became determined to find Huang, to understand how she ended up running a Chinese restaurant on Fogo Island. I wanted to know how she wound up there alone. So I set out a plan: to drive across the country, visiting as many small-town Chinese restaurants as possible. I’d start on the West Coast, where the earliest wave of Chinese settlers began arriving in 1858. From there, I would make my way east across a 2 ½ -week period, roughly tracing the path of the railway. [more inside]
posted by CrystalDave on Dec 26, 2016 - 32 comments

Trump Eggs: They're All White!™

Yolkless eggs are actually common enough that chicken keepers have a number of names for them—fairy egg, witch egg, rooster egg, oops eggs, dwarf egg, wind egg, and, most commonly, fart egg. This is but one of the myriad ways an egg can go wonky. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Dec 24, 2016 - 32 comments

Melbourne

The City That Knows How To Eat A short essay by a food critic reflecting on Melbourne, its food culture and life more generally.
posted by wilful on Dec 22, 2016 - 45 comments

"It's like the taste of my Grandma's sofa."

Washington Post writer Monica Hesse ruminates on an annual office party snack tradition (The giant tri-flavor holiday popcorn tin sends a message, which is, “I was thinking of you, but not until I was already in the checkout aisle of Big Lots.”) and speaks with the CEO of one of the major producers (“If you lined up all of our holiday popcorn tins that we produced in 2016, you could start at the White House and end at Fenway Park in Boston.”). Meanwhile, Post staffers compare an expensive tin to a cheap one to answer the culinary question "Is there really a difference between holiday popcorn brands?" (video, no captions).
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Dec 21, 2016 - 95 comments

How to eat a scorpion in style

The Futuristic Utensils Designed to Help You Eat Bugs (Atlas Obscura). From the designer's project page:"The product is meaningful to be joyful for eating insects and stretch food culture." [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Dec 12, 2016 - 34 comments

AA Gill Obituary: Renowned restaurant critic earned fame and infamy

The journalist AA Gill, who has died aged 62, less than a month after revealing he was seriously ill with cancer The Sunday Times journalist, who was regarded by many on Fleet Street as one of the great newspaper stylists, opened his restaurant column three weeks ago with the abrupt declaration he was suffering with “an embarrassment of cancer”. He went on: “There is barely a morsel of offal that is not included. I have a trucker’s gut-buster, gimpy, malevolent, meaty malignancy.” He wanted readers to know, he said, in case it affected his judgments about food. [more inside]
posted by helmutdog on Dec 12, 2016 - 38 comments

Tastes like

Restaurant reviews are a dime a dozen on Youtube, but what the world still lacked was a guy going around London chicken shops rating them on wing crispiness, chip consistency, burger buildup and value for money (anything over two pounds fifty is stretching it). Fortunately, now there's Chicken Connoisseur's The Pengest Munch to fill the gap.
posted by MartinWisse on Dec 9, 2016 - 18 comments

Cooking In Russia

Greg Easter and his Youtube channel, CookingInRussia, are one of the internet's greatest (and growing) repositories of culinary knowledge. I was reminded again of his unequalled excellence when he recently posted his unbelievable recipe for Persian Rose Chicken. Everything he teaches is directed at the home cook, but he will never dumb it down or simplify anything to sacrifice flavor. If a stock cube will make it taste just as good as stock from scratch, he's absolutely fine with that. But if stock from scratch is what's required, he will quite directly tell you to start roasting those bones, buster. [more inside]
posted by macross city flaneur on Dec 6, 2016 - 12 comments

“Tofu was a tough sell"

In what remains a QVC record, Ina Garten — the only guest who Mr. Venable says made him feel like a crazed teenager at a rock concert — sold out of 30,000 copies of her latest book in 25 minutes 4 seconds. And that doesn’t take into account what the publishing industry calls the QVC effect. That is, the extra sales and marketing power that rises up through Amazon sales and bookstore orders because QVC has deemed a book worthy. -- QVC’s David Venable: The Man Who Helps America Cook by Kim Severson, New York Times
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 4, 2016 - 16 comments

"A Stir‐Fried Masterpiece"

Peng Chang-kuei, the inventor of General Tso's Chicken, has died at the age of 98. Peng first made the dish in the 1950s while working for the Nationalist government in Taiwan, naming it for Zuo Zongtang, a statesman and military leader from the Qing dynasty famous for having put down the Taiping Rebellion (previously). When the dish made it to the U.S., the New York Times' Mimi Sheraton raved about it using the words in the post title. [more inside]
posted by Cash4Lead on Dec 2, 2016 - 33 comments

It was just salt.

When you emigrate, you end up the last person to touch a lot of your family history. Somewhere along the line, we’ll forget my mom’s maiden name. We’ll forget what her actual name was before she changed it when she moved. We’ll lose language and the way to make a candle from ghee and a cotton ball. I can’t pull all of this information out of her, and I can’t carry all of it after she’s gone, and I panic when I think about how impossible it feels to one day not need her. But at least I can try to cook.
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 1, 2016 - 18 comments

But I wanted a circular pancake

A simple but ingenious pancake-making machine. [more inside]
posted by Stark on Nov 30, 2016 - 25 comments

Cooking/Maryland/History

A Maryland Food History Blog: 300 Years of Black Cooking in St. Mary’s County---Free State Oyster Omelet ---Interview with a Maryland Waterman---Mrs. Kitching’s Clam Chowder
posted by josher71 on Nov 18, 2016 - 16 comments

The American Thanksgiving

Fifteen families share with the New York Times their traditional Thanksgiving dishes. Recipes for all are collected here.
posted by backseatpilot on Nov 17, 2016 - 63 comments

Native American Ethnobotany Database

A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants.
posted by aniola on Nov 13, 2016 - 6 comments

There is no sincerer love than the love of food.

Food Decoration Fails — when your meal looks worse than you feel.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Nov 9, 2016 - 46 comments

RIP Product 19 ...................

"PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don't discontinue this cereal," one fan wrote on Kellogg's community boards a few months ago. " I LOVE LOVE LOVE this cereal!" The Long Death of Product 19, the Most Beloved Cereal You've Never Heard Of [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Nov 7, 2016 - 87 comments

Agrindus Come Round: Eating Your Ethics or Mouth On the Money

Eating Right, Harper's, by John Herron I think that the metaphor of seeing ethics in terms of a supermarket array of consumption decisions is all too pervasive in contemporary society. -- Philosopher Paul B. Thompson [more inside]
posted by lazycomputerkids on Nov 6, 2016 - 8 comments

tofu misozuke

I am just so in love with tofu misozuke that I thought I would share a recipe with y'all since they say it's hard to find, even in Japan. Think: tofu with bite like “Roquefort at the limit of ripeness” [more inside]
posted by aniola on Nov 3, 2016 - 33 comments

The uncertain history of Hollandaise: dueling stories of a tasty sauce

Hollandaise sauce might sound like a typical Dutch delicacy, however, it isn’t from the Netherlands at all, and instead was originally called Sauce Isigny (Google books) after a town in Normandy, Isigny-sur-Mer, known for its butter and other dairy products, but was renamed Sauce Hollandaise in World War I when butter was imported from Holland. Or was it? (Gb). When the once exiled Huguenots returned from northern Europe back to France, they may have brought a creamy, lemony sauce known as Sauce à la Hollandaise, as listed there in François Marin's 1758 cookbook Les Dons de Comus, and similarly in The Book of Household Management by Mrs. Isabella Beeton as "Dutch Sauce for Fish," and "Green sauce, or Hollandaise verte" (Archive.org). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 2, 2016 - 58 comments

It's time to bake a cake

BBC News: As the sun rises over the Old World Levain (OWL) Bakery in Asheville, North Carolina, a heady, warm scent of spices floats through the air outside. In the kitchen, bakers Susannah Gebhart and Maia Surdam are working with sourdough culture, dried fruit, butter, sorghum syrup and generous measures of sherry and whisky to revive an American tradition. Bon Appetit: Werner opted for an earthy rye and buckwheat base, with bourbon-bolstered stone fruits, and a toothsome mix of poppy seeds, flax seeds, and cocoa nibs. Miscovich chose an egalitarian version filled with currants and spices, minus the booze, so that everyone can partake. Actual recipe and another recipe, and a related 2014 song from Eurovision. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Nov 1, 2016 - 22 comments

"It suddenly looks like it's made for cooking"

In Food Hacking, a documentary series of shorts from Vice's Munchies, host Simon Klose explores the people and science mapping out new boundaries of Japanese cuisine, as well as their social and environmental implications. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 27, 2016 - 3 comments

Or you could just buy some Eggos

Stranger Things is streaming on Netflix, so just in time for Halloween, Netflix Kitchens shows you how to make French Onion Barb and Demogorgon Pie.
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 24, 2016 - 9 comments

Delicious in any language

The PBS documentary series "The Migrant Kitchen" explores Los Angeles’ booming food scene through the eyes of a new generation of chefs whose cuisine is inspired by the immigrant experience. The filmmakers visit the kitchens of those who have transformed the culinary landscape of the city, combining traditional ethnic cuisines and a fusion of new flavors and techniques. Ep 1: Chirmol: How a Guatemalan Tradition Journeyed to an American Menu; Ep 2: Barkada: L.A.’s Exploding Filipino Food Movement; Ep 3: Mercado: Artisanal Street Food & L.A.'s Best Mole; Ep 4: Loghmeh: Whole Animal Roasts & Middle-Eastern Culinary Traditions; Ep 5: Banchan: Korean Food Beyond BBQ. [Scroll down the pages for related background and recipes.]
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 22, 2016 - 9 comments

A Snack Tray to Gather the Family Around

The lady in seat 4F, though, the one in the light cashmere pullover reading the newspaper, she clicked the latch on her seat-back tray and said: “Double Smirnoff, on the rocks. And Doritos.” NYTimes [more inside]
posted by mosessis on Oct 21, 2016 - 53 comments

The secret behind Italy's rarest pasta

"[I]n a modest apartment in the town of Nuoro, a slight 62-year-old named Paola Abraini wakes up every day at 7 am to begin making su filindeu – the rarest pasta in the world."
posted by SansPoint on Oct 20, 2016 - 53 comments

"a history lesson, a geopolitical reflection and a mouthwatering decent"

Our Fancy Foods, Ourselves - Three days at the world's greatest assemblage of exotic, expensive, absurd, and occasionally delicious snacks [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 16, 2016 - 7 comments

so put away that meat you're selling

"Millions of containers, thousands of ships, hundreds of scientists, 30 laws, 15 federal agencies, and we still can't prevent the next foodborne illness outbreak."

[Fun supplementary reading: FDA Defect Levels Handbook, FSIS Meat & Poultry Hazards & Controls Guide, CDC Foodborne Outbreak Investigations.]
posted by amnesia and magnets on Oct 11, 2016 - 12 comments

Maximum Nutrition with Minimal Effort

People get “violently ill” from Soylent bars; company stumped
posted by almostmanda on Oct 11, 2016 - 141 comments

Super Size

The Dizzying Grandeur of 21st Century Agriculture [NYT link] Our industrialized food system nourishes more people, at lower cost, than any comparable system in history. It also exerts a terrifyingly massive influence on our health and our environment. Photographer George Steinmetz spent nearly a year traveling the country to capture that system, in all its scope, grandeur and dizzying scale. His photographs are all the more remarkable for the fact that so few large food producers are willing to open themselves to this sort of public view [more inside]
posted by helmutdog on Oct 5, 2016 - 25 comments

“Cranking out more and more boxes was all they cared about.”

The Box: The Not-So-Wholesome Reality Behind The Making of Your Meal Kit [Buzzfeed] “Blue Apron wants to revolutionize the food system by selling would-be home cooks all the ingredients they need to make a meal without setting foot in the grocery store. But a BuzzFeed News investigation has found that in the rush to scale its supply chain at the speed of startup, the company has had health and safety violations, violent incidents, and unhappy workers at one of its packing facilities.”
posted by Fizz on Oct 3, 2016 - 83 comments

The Politics of Dancing

The economics of dining as a couple - "I am eternally astonished to find not only that many couples I know failed to discuss this key area before they marched up to the altar, but also that many of them still have not developed a joint dining strategy even after 10 or 20 years together. This is madness." Megan McArdle blends economics and marriage therapy.
posted by GuyZero on Oct 2, 2016 - 98 comments

You’ve been drinking SQUASH FREAKING SPICE LATTES this entire time

I just found out canned pumpkin isn't actually pumpkin at all, and my whole life is basically a lie. By Emma Crist at Food & Wine.
posted by Mchelly on Sep 28, 2016 - 111 comments

Daily life for kids in Japan.

Why Japanese bathrooms are the best. What a Japanese apartment is like. Breakfast, lunch and dinner.
posted by Bee'sWing on Sep 24, 2016 - 63 comments

I should have just eaten the 18 pounds of Red Leicester.

Deccan Chronicle: "In a study that has been widely welcomed, researchers from the University of Copenhagen found that eating cheese is good for our hearts." More from [askmen] [delish] [allure] [Telegraph - mentions other studies]. The actual research article conclusion: "A high daily intake of regular-fat cheese for 12 weeks did not alter LDL cholesterol or MetS risk factors differently than an equal intake of reduced-fat cheese or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods."
posted by Wordshore on Sep 24, 2016 - 40 comments

Coming soon to a state fair near you

What do you get when you literally cross a hamburger with a hotdog? Hamdog!
posted by ardgedee on Sep 21, 2016 - 114 comments

God's Own Country: the nation of Yorkshire

Yorkshire is a county in t'north of England. It has a distinct range of dialects; for example 'nowt' means 'nothing', 'who?' means 'what?' and 'how are you?' is asked ... differently, with further variations across the county. Yorkshire is famous for its pudding, caustic cricket commentary, rhubarb, having its own day, one of the earliest surviving film fragments, the chocolate bar, poetry, tea, and ferret legging (alternative explanation). The anthem of Yorkshire, On Ilkla Moor Baht 'at, is about hats, death and cannibalism. Like other English regions, such as Cornwall and Wessex, Yorkshire has movements towards devolution, greater autonomy and ultimately independence. But what is the essence of Yorkshire? [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Sep 20, 2016 - 39 comments

“Ooooh, floor pie!”

‘Five-Second Rule’ for Food on Floor Is Untrue, Study Finds [The New York Times] “You may think your floors are so clean you can eat off them, but a new study debunking the so-called five-second rule would suggest otherwise. Professor Donald W. Schaffner, a food microbiologist at Rutgers University in New Jersey, said a two-year study he led concluded that no matter how fast you pick up food that falls on the floor, you will pick up bacteria with it. The findings in the report — “Is the Five-Second Rule Real?” — appeared online this month in the American Society for Microbiology’s journal, Applied and Environmental Microbiology.”
posted by Fizz on Sep 19, 2016 - 123 comments

Potatoes and cheese are friends!

Aligot? It's a legendary blend of mashed potatoes, cheese, butter, cream, and garlic from the Aubrac region in France. Aligot en français. Aligot!
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide on Sep 16, 2016 - 51 comments

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